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  • 18 Sep 2021
    Beginners in the running world may not know how to breathe while running - but it doesn't have to be the massive stressor your mind makes it out to be.  Your heart rate and muscles will change once you start running faster, but panic can also set in.  You can get faster and feel less stressed when you run if you learn how to breathe effectively. You might even start to appreciate the wind in your hair and your breathing as you pound the pavement. Here's how to breathe while running - and if different breathing patterns can reduce the stress on your lungs when you're running.  How should you breathe when you're running? Running harder will make you out of breath since your respiratory system is used to breathing a certain way. You can breathe better if you relax as much as you can. Nick Anderson, head coach for Saucony and GB & EA running coach, says people go out way too fast and don't learn to pace themselves. What happens if you run too fast? You can only operate in anaerobic mode for a short period before you need to slow down to get back into aerobic mode." Tana von Zitzewitz, a master trainer at Barry's UK, says nasal breathing gives you a lot of oxygen and helps your body get rid of carbon dioxide. Ten runners were tested for six months on nasal breathing by Colorado State University. Their breathing rate and breaths per minute decreased when they inhaled more oxygen and exhaled more carbon dioxide. When you inhale, your nose should be your point of entry, and when you exhale, your mouth should be your point of exit. She feels good about how hard she's working when she runs with Tana, a UKA Run Leader. Run at a pace you can hold a conversation with someone next to you in your early weeks: "If it's hard for you to talk to someone next to you, you're running too hard. As you get fitter, you can run at a different pace." What's the deal with rhythmic breathing? Running is said to calm the nervous system by breathing rhythmically. Studies on running and cortisol levels have also shown that running can increase levels of cortisol in the body, a hormone linked to stress if you're running at a moderate to high intensity.  Breathing rhythmically isn't natural, but it can calm your body. How should it be done? Breathing out is necessary for emptying the lungs. Taking in five deep breaths, holding them for five seconds, and exhaling them through your mouth. A study at the University of Utah found that rhythmic breathing is an excellent way for runners to reduce stress on their respiratory systems, which in turn reduces respiratory muscle fatigue. It also improves breathing efficiency through improved gas mixing, transport, and exchange. "Rhythmic breathing and running require a lot of concentration," von Zitzewitz told Live Science. "You have to count the steps you take inhaling, then exhaling, then counting each step." Take five minutes to do the breathing exercise while listening to relaxing music. You can try this technique on a slow jog once you become comfortable with it and see if it helps you improve your running, then you can gradually incorporate it into your routine. von Zitzewitz suggests that, if this technique is too laborious for you, being more aware of your breathing while running will help you run better. When running long distances, start slowly and remember to breathe. You should be able to breathe effortlessly in through the nose and out through the mouth once you get up to a steady pace. You will fatigue if it becomes too labored too quickly, and so your pace will not be sustainable, so you will need to make small adjustments. Running improves with practice by making small, consistent improvements over time. Start with your base pace and add little improvements over time. As well as Pranayama, she states it helps you be more flexible in your lungs and helps you breathe more effectively when you're running, and suggests, "Make sure to warm up and activate your lungs prior to your run by doing these deep breathing exercises." Do you breathe differently when you run? You'll naturally find that your form is off if you're breathing laboriously or are stressed when running.  If you aren't relaxed while running, you'll naturally slouch. If your shoulders are down, your back is straight, and your hips are forward. The hardest thing about running is learning how to relax, but if you breathe correctly you can quickly accomplish that. It should then correct itself by itself, but if you still feel stressed, Anderson advises runners to let go of stress, yet stay aware of posture. She says, "Drop your shoulders down and raise your arms - this will take your mind off the stress your breathing is causing."
    186 Posted by UniqueThis
  • Beginners in the running world may not know how to breathe while running - but it doesn't have to be the massive stressor your mind makes it out to be.  Your heart rate and muscles will change once you start running faster, but panic can also set in.  You can get faster and feel less stressed when you run if you learn how to breathe effectively. You might even start to appreciate the wind in your hair and your breathing as you pound the pavement. Here's how to breathe while running - and if different breathing patterns can reduce the stress on your lungs when you're running.  How should you breathe when you're running? Running harder will make you out of breath since your respiratory system is used to breathing a certain way. You can breathe better if you relax as much as you can. Nick Anderson, head coach for Saucony and GB & EA running coach, says people go out way too fast and don't learn to pace themselves. What happens if you run too fast? You can only operate in anaerobic mode for a short period before you need to slow down to get back into aerobic mode." Tana von Zitzewitz, a master trainer at Barry's UK, says nasal breathing gives you a lot of oxygen and helps your body get rid of carbon dioxide. Ten runners were tested for six months on nasal breathing by Colorado State University. Their breathing rate and breaths per minute decreased when they inhaled more oxygen and exhaled more carbon dioxide. When you inhale, your nose should be your point of entry, and when you exhale, your mouth should be your point of exit. She feels good about how hard she's working when she runs with Tana, a UKA Run Leader. Run at a pace you can hold a conversation with someone next to you in your early weeks: "If it's hard for you to talk to someone next to you, you're running too hard. As you get fitter, you can run at a different pace." What's the deal with rhythmic breathing? Running is said to calm the nervous system by breathing rhythmically. Studies on running and cortisol levels have also shown that running can increase levels of cortisol in the body, a hormone linked to stress if you're running at a moderate to high intensity.  Breathing rhythmically isn't natural, but it can calm your body. How should it be done? Breathing out is necessary for emptying the lungs. Taking in five deep breaths, holding them for five seconds, and exhaling them through your mouth. A study at the University of Utah found that rhythmic breathing is an excellent way for runners to reduce stress on their respiratory systems, which in turn reduces respiratory muscle fatigue. It also improves breathing efficiency through improved gas mixing, transport, and exchange. "Rhythmic breathing and running require a lot of concentration," von Zitzewitz told Live Science. "You have to count the steps you take inhaling, then exhaling, then counting each step." Take five minutes to do the breathing exercise while listening to relaxing music. You can try this technique on a slow jog once you become comfortable with it and see if it helps you improve your running, then you can gradually incorporate it into your routine. von Zitzewitz suggests that, if this technique is too laborious for you, being more aware of your breathing while running will help you run better. When running long distances, start slowly and remember to breathe. You should be able to breathe effortlessly in through the nose and out through the mouth once you get up to a steady pace. You will fatigue if it becomes too labored too quickly, and so your pace will not be sustainable, so you will need to make small adjustments. Running improves with practice by making small, consistent improvements over time. Start with your base pace and add little improvements over time. As well as Pranayama, she states it helps you be more flexible in your lungs and helps you breathe more effectively when you're running, and suggests, "Make sure to warm up and activate your lungs prior to your run by doing these deep breathing exercises." Do you breathe differently when you run? You'll naturally find that your form is off if you're breathing laboriously or are stressed when running.  If you aren't relaxed while running, you'll naturally slouch. If your shoulders are down, your back is straight, and your hips are forward. The hardest thing about running is learning how to relax, but if you breathe correctly you can quickly accomplish that. It should then correct itself by itself, but if you still feel stressed, Anderson advises runners to let go of stress, yet stay aware of posture. She says, "Drop your shoulders down and raise your arms - this will take your mind off the stress your breathing is causing."
    Sep 18, 2021 186