Winnett Specialist Group 's Entries

10 blogs
  • 21 Jul 2018
    Have You Heard About ESG? Endoscopic Sleeve Gastroplasty (ESG). A non-surgical weight loss solution Do you have more than 10kg to lose? Would you like a little help to reach your goal weight? If you are not ready or eligible for weight loss surgery, the new ESG procedure may be the perfect solution for you. The Endoscopic Sleeve Gastroplasty (ESG) is a new weight loss procedure that began in 2012 at the Mayo Clinic in the United States and is now being offered by respected bariatric surgeon Mr. Jason Winnett at Winnett Specialist Group. It’s a non-surgical procedure that takes around 90 minutes from start to finish, while the patient is under general anaesthetic. Compared to other weight loss procedures and surgeries, recovery after an ESG is fast. Most patients will return to work after 2-3 days. There are some possible side effects to be aware of in the first couple of days following the procedure. These include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and abdominal cramping. A strict adherence to dietary guidelines will help to minimize side effects. The ESG procedure is well suited to individuals with a BMI between 30-40kg/m2 and who are not eligible for weight loss surgery. The expected weight loss from this procedure is up 25% of total body weight. The ESG procedure can help to reduce the risk of weight related conditions such as reflux (GORD), heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and sleep apnoea. After this procedure patients enjoy quite quick weight loss, which is achieved by feeling full from small portions as a result of the stomach volume being reduced by 70%. The weight loss results in the first 6 months following the procedure are crucial to long-term success. All patients must be committed to a healthy lifestyle and regular review consultations with our multidisciplinary team (that includes doctor, dietitian, psychologist and personal trainer) for at least 12 months. While the physical recovery form the procedure is generally fast, it will take about 6 weeks to transition back to a solid diet. The dietary phases associated with the procedure are a two week preparation diet before the procedure followed by a two week fluid diet after the procedure. Patients then move up to a puree diet for a further two weeks then onto soft foods for two weeks before returning to normal solid foods at week 6. Lifelong vitamin and mineral supplementation is required after the ESG procedure. A bariatric multivitamin and daily fibre supplement are recommended. If you think the ESG procedure could be right for you or you would like more information, call our friendly staff to arrange an obligation free consultation with Mr. Jason Winnett on 03 9417 1555
    103 Posted by Winnett Specialist Group
  • Have You Heard About ESG? Endoscopic Sleeve Gastroplasty (ESG). A non-surgical weight loss solution Do you have more than 10kg to lose? Would you like a little help to reach your goal weight? If you are not ready or eligible for weight loss surgery, the new ESG procedure may be the perfect solution for you. The Endoscopic Sleeve Gastroplasty (ESG) is a new weight loss procedure that began in 2012 at the Mayo Clinic in the United States and is now being offered by respected bariatric surgeon Mr. Jason Winnett at Winnett Specialist Group. It’s a non-surgical procedure that takes around 90 minutes from start to finish, while the patient is under general anaesthetic. Compared to other weight loss procedures and surgeries, recovery after an ESG is fast. Most patients will return to work after 2-3 days. There are some possible side effects to be aware of in the first couple of days following the procedure. These include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and abdominal cramping. A strict adherence to dietary guidelines will help to minimize side effects. The ESG procedure is well suited to individuals with a BMI between 30-40kg/m2 and who are not eligible for weight loss surgery. The expected weight loss from this procedure is up 25% of total body weight. The ESG procedure can help to reduce the risk of weight related conditions such as reflux (GORD), heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and sleep apnoea. After this procedure patients enjoy quite quick weight loss, which is achieved by feeling full from small portions as a result of the stomach volume being reduced by 70%. The weight loss results in the first 6 months following the procedure are crucial to long-term success. All patients must be committed to a healthy lifestyle and regular review consultations with our multidisciplinary team (that includes doctor, dietitian, psychologist and personal trainer) for at least 12 months. While the physical recovery form the procedure is generally fast, it will take about 6 weeks to transition back to a solid diet. The dietary phases associated with the procedure are a two week preparation diet before the procedure followed by a two week fluid diet after the procedure. Patients then move up to a puree diet for a further two weeks then onto soft foods for two weeks before returning to normal solid foods at week 6. Lifelong vitamin and mineral supplementation is required after the ESG procedure. A bariatric multivitamin and daily fibre supplement are recommended. If you think the ESG procedure could be right for you or you would like more information, call our friendly staff to arrange an obligation free consultation with Mr. Jason Winnett on 03 9417 1555
    Jul 21, 2018 103
  • 23 May 2018
    Pre-existing and Postoperative Nutritional Deficiencies in Bariatric Patients Nutrition education and medical nutrition therapy are integral to the success of a patient’s bariatric surgery journey.  Nutrition counselling plays an especially important part in long-term weight loss maintenance, but it also serves to correct any pre-existing nutritional deficiencies or for any that come about after surgery.  This article summarises nutritional deficiencies common to bariatric patients prior to and after surgery. Pre-existing nutritional deficiencies Some of the vitamin and mineral deficiencies we see in bariatric patients prior to their surgery include vitamin D, iron, zinc and vitamin B12.  These could be due to a number of reasons including not getting enough sunlight (Vitamin D) or dietary sources of the nutrients, or there may be a physiological cause leading to poor absorption of these nutrients.  Obesity is an inflammatory disease and inflammation can interfere with metabolic processes. Why are nutrients at risk after surgery? There is an increased risk of nutritional deficiencies with all types of bariatric surgery.  This is due to several reasons including a reduced capacity for food, possible food intolerances coming about after surgery, poor food choices and occurrences of regurgitation or reflux.  Some bariatric procedures are associated with a higher risk of nutritional deficiencies than others.  While the Obera Intragastric Balloon and Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Band (LAGB) do reduce capacity for food and can be associated with the previously mentioned reasons for nutritional deficiencies, they do not alter human anatomy and physiology.  The Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) and Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) both result in altered human anatomy and physiology, by which they help to contribute to weight loss, but may thus result in nutritional deficiencies.  Some reasons behind the increased risk for nutritional deficiencies in the RYGB and LSG include reduced acid production in the stomach and the reduced production of a substance called intrinsic factor, which enables the body to absorb vitamin B12.  Dumping syndrome or abnormally rapid bowel evacuation can occur with the RYGB and LSG and this can cause nutritional deficiencies if it leads to food intolerance.
    113 Posted by Winnett Specialist Group
  • Pre-existing and Postoperative Nutritional Deficiencies in Bariatric Patients Nutrition education and medical nutrition therapy are integral to the success of a patient’s bariatric surgery journey.  Nutrition counselling plays an especially important part in long-term weight loss maintenance, but it also serves to correct any pre-existing nutritional deficiencies or for any that come about after surgery.  This article summarises nutritional deficiencies common to bariatric patients prior to and after surgery. Pre-existing nutritional deficiencies Some of the vitamin and mineral deficiencies we see in bariatric patients prior to their surgery include vitamin D, iron, zinc and vitamin B12.  These could be due to a number of reasons including not getting enough sunlight (Vitamin D) or dietary sources of the nutrients, or there may be a physiological cause leading to poor absorption of these nutrients.  Obesity is an inflammatory disease and inflammation can interfere with metabolic processes. Why are nutrients at risk after surgery? There is an increased risk of nutritional deficiencies with all types of bariatric surgery.  This is due to several reasons including a reduced capacity for food, possible food intolerances coming about after surgery, poor food choices and occurrences of regurgitation or reflux.  Some bariatric procedures are associated with a higher risk of nutritional deficiencies than others.  While the Obera Intragastric Balloon and Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Band (LAGB) do reduce capacity for food and can be associated with the previously mentioned reasons for nutritional deficiencies, they do not alter human anatomy and physiology.  The Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) and Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) both result in altered human anatomy and physiology, by which they help to contribute to weight loss, but may thus result in nutritional deficiencies.  Some reasons behind the increased risk for nutritional deficiencies in the RYGB and LSG include reduced acid production in the stomach and the reduced production of a substance called intrinsic factor, which enables the body to absorb vitamin B12.  Dumping syndrome or abnormally rapid bowel evacuation can occur with the RYGB and LSG and this can cause nutritional deficiencies if it leads to food intolerance.
    May 23, 2018 113
  • 15 May 2018
    Pre-existing and Postoperative Nutritional Deficiencies in Bariatric Patients Nutrition education and medical nutrition therapy are integral to the success of a patient’s bariatric surgery journey. Nutrition counselling plays an especially important part in long-term weight loss maintenance, but it also serves to correct any pre-existing nutritional deficiencies or for any that come about after surgery. This article summarises nutritional deficiencies common to bariatric patients prior to and after surgery. Pre-existing nutritional deficiencies Some of the vitamin and mineral deficiencies we see in bariatric patients prior to their surgery include vitamin D, iron, zinc and vitamin B12. These could be due to a number of reasons including not getting enough sunlight (Vitamin D) or dietary sources of the nutrients, or there may be a physiological cause leading to poor absorption of these nutrients. Obesity is an inflammatory disease and inflammation can interfere with metabolic processes.  Why are nutrients at risk after surgery? There is an increased risk of nutritional deficiencies with all types of bariatric surgery. This is due to several reasons including a reduced capacity for food, possible food intolerances coming about after surgery, poor food choices and occurrences of regurgitation or reflux. Some bariatric procedures are associated with a higher risk of nutritional deficiencies than others. While the Obera Intragastric Balloon and Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Band (LAGB) do reduce capacity for food and can be associated with the previously mentioned reasons for nutritional deficiencies, they do not alter human anatomy and physiology. The Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) and Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) both result in altered human anatomy and physiology, by which they help to contribute to weight loss, but may thus result in nutritional deficiencies. Some reasons behind the increased risk for nutritional deficiencies in the RYGB and LSG include reduced acid production in the stomach and the reduced production of a substance called intrinsic factor, which enables the body to absorb vitamin B12. Dumping syndrome or abnormally rapid bowel evacuation can occur with the RYGB and LSG and this can cause nutritional deficiencies if it leads to food intolerance. 
    117 Posted by Winnett Specialist Group
  • Pre-existing and Postoperative Nutritional Deficiencies in Bariatric Patients Nutrition education and medical nutrition therapy are integral to the success of a patient’s bariatric surgery journey. Nutrition counselling plays an especially important part in long-term weight loss maintenance, but it also serves to correct any pre-existing nutritional deficiencies or for any that come about after surgery. This article summarises nutritional deficiencies common to bariatric patients prior to and after surgery. Pre-existing nutritional deficiencies Some of the vitamin and mineral deficiencies we see in bariatric patients prior to their surgery include vitamin D, iron, zinc and vitamin B12. These could be due to a number of reasons including not getting enough sunlight (Vitamin D) or dietary sources of the nutrients, or there may be a physiological cause leading to poor absorption of these nutrients. Obesity is an inflammatory disease and inflammation can interfere with metabolic processes.  Why are nutrients at risk after surgery? There is an increased risk of nutritional deficiencies with all types of bariatric surgery. This is due to several reasons including a reduced capacity for food, possible food intolerances coming about after surgery, poor food choices and occurrences of regurgitation or reflux. Some bariatric procedures are associated with a higher risk of nutritional deficiencies than others. While the Obera Intragastric Balloon and Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Band (LAGB) do reduce capacity for food and can be associated with the previously mentioned reasons for nutritional deficiencies, they do not alter human anatomy and physiology. The Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) and Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) both result in altered human anatomy and physiology, by which they help to contribute to weight loss, but may thus result in nutritional deficiencies. Some reasons behind the increased risk for nutritional deficiencies in the RYGB and LSG include reduced acid production in the stomach and the reduced production of a substance called intrinsic factor, which enables the body to absorb vitamin B12. Dumping syndrome or abnormally rapid bowel evacuation can occur with the RYGB and LSG and this can cause nutritional deficiencies if it leads to food intolerance. 
    May 15, 2018 117
  • 16 Apr 2018
    A patient said to me recently “the emotional changes I am experiencing since surgery have been completely unexpected and I think there needs to be more support for this after surgery”. There is so much support and guidance around the surgery itself and the initial pre and post-operative dietary stages, but this is only the beginning. Within the first couple of months of having bariatric surgery, most people learn a lot about themselves and their bad habits. Prior to surgery, many of these go unnoticed because it’s auto pilot behaviour, habitual patterns being practiced over and over again without much conscious thought. So now that these bad habits have been uncovered, what can you do to change them and set yourself up emotionally, for a rewarding and enjoyable new life? Here are my top 5 ways to master the post surgery mindset shift: 1. Mindfulness training Mindfulness training, in particular mindful eating training is so valuable and really is the only way to gain control over your food intake including emotional eating. I am asked almost every day about how to stop emotional eating and my answer is always to practice mindful eating, everyday, as much as you can, until it becomes habit. The simplest way to start practicing mindful eating today is to use a hunger/fullness scale to rank your appetite before, during and after every meal and snack. On a scale form 0 to 10 with 0 being starving, 5 being satisfied and 10 being stuffed full, pick a number that you think best represents your level of appetite and record it in a diary. You are aiming to only eat when your appetite is between 2-3 and to stop eating when you reach 5. 2. Daily meditation I know you are probably freaking out reading this one! Bare with me because it’s quicker and easier than you think and believe me, you will notice the benefits immediately. Meditation is simply focusing on your breath and you do this by switching off from the outside for short time each day. The improvement you will notice in your stress levels, eating habits and wellbeing are amazing! 5 minutes each day is all it takes to reap the rewards of daily meditation practice. Follow these five steps to get started: Pick a quiet place to sit where you won’t be disturbed Relax your body, close your eyes and take deep breaths in and out. Focus on your breath With your eyes closed, observe the breath in and out When thoughts come into your mind, acknowledge them and gently move them on. Come back to the breath It’s important that you don’t make meditation a stressful part of your day. It will reduce stress and help you in so many ways if you allow it  3. Keeping a diary Self-monitoring is an essential part of life when you are working towards achieving a goal. It is the only way to track your progress and keep yourself on the right path. There are many different ways to self-monitor. Hoping on the scales every week is one, keeping a journal and/or food diary is another. I had a patient recently come to me for advice on why their weight loss had stopped and number of blockages had increased. I got them to keep a strict food diary for a week (not for me to review but as a mindfulness, self monitoring exercise) and the result was amazing. In just 10 days they dropped 2kg and went from 2-4 blockages per day to only 2 in 10 days! Start now to keep a journal or food diary, do it every day for a month and see what changes you can achieve. 4. Goal setting It’s time to start putting yourself first, everyday. You have made the bold decision to have weight loss surgery for yourself and now you need to follow through. Set yourself some goals to ensure that you get the most from your weight loss surgery experience. Some goals may be weight related but try to set some that have nothing to do with weight as well. After all, life is bigger than just the number on the scale or the number on the tag of your clothes. It is a good idea to arrange your goals into short, medium and long term. 5. Start each day with purpose There is only one thing in life that you can never have more of and that is time. How you choose to spend your time is going to determine whether or not you ever get to live the life you dream of or not. Once you have your goals written down, you can then set daily intentions to help you achieve them. Start each day with purpose by selecting an affirmation or word that you will live by that day that will edge you closer to the life you want for yourself. http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/    
    124 Posted by Winnett Specialist Group
  • A patient said to me recently “the emotional changes I am experiencing since surgery have been completely unexpected and I think there needs to be more support for this after surgery”. There is so much support and guidance around the surgery itself and the initial pre and post-operative dietary stages, but this is only the beginning. Within the first couple of months of having bariatric surgery, most people learn a lot about themselves and their bad habits. Prior to surgery, many of these go unnoticed because it’s auto pilot behaviour, habitual patterns being practiced over and over again without much conscious thought. So now that these bad habits have been uncovered, what can you do to change them and set yourself up emotionally, for a rewarding and enjoyable new life? Here are my top 5 ways to master the post surgery mindset shift: 1. Mindfulness training Mindfulness training, in particular mindful eating training is so valuable and really is the only way to gain control over your food intake including emotional eating. I am asked almost every day about how to stop emotional eating and my answer is always to practice mindful eating, everyday, as much as you can, until it becomes habit. The simplest way to start practicing mindful eating today is to use a hunger/fullness scale to rank your appetite before, during and after every meal and snack. On a scale form 0 to 10 with 0 being starving, 5 being satisfied and 10 being stuffed full, pick a number that you think best represents your level of appetite and record it in a diary. You are aiming to only eat when your appetite is between 2-3 and to stop eating when you reach 5. 2. Daily meditation I know you are probably freaking out reading this one! Bare with me because it’s quicker and easier than you think and believe me, you will notice the benefits immediately. Meditation is simply focusing on your breath and you do this by switching off from the outside for short time each day. The improvement you will notice in your stress levels, eating habits and wellbeing are amazing! 5 minutes each day is all it takes to reap the rewards of daily meditation practice. Follow these five steps to get started: Pick a quiet place to sit where you won’t be disturbed Relax your body, close your eyes and take deep breaths in and out. Focus on your breath With your eyes closed, observe the breath in and out When thoughts come into your mind, acknowledge them and gently move them on. Come back to the breath It’s important that you don’t make meditation a stressful part of your day. It will reduce stress and help you in so many ways if you allow it  3. Keeping a diary Self-monitoring is an essential part of life when you are working towards achieving a goal. It is the only way to track your progress and keep yourself on the right path. There are many different ways to self-monitor. Hoping on the scales every week is one, keeping a journal and/or food diary is another. I had a patient recently come to me for advice on why their weight loss had stopped and number of blockages had increased. I got them to keep a strict food diary for a week (not for me to review but as a mindfulness, self monitoring exercise) and the result was amazing. In just 10 days they dropped 2kg and went from 2-4 blockages per day to only 2 in 10 days! Start now to keep a journal or food diary, do it every day for a month and see what changes you can achieve. 4. Goal setting It’s time to start putting yourself first, everyday. You have made the bold decision to have weight loss surgery for yourself and now you need to follow through. Set yourself some goals to ensure that you get the most from your weight loss surgery experience. Some goals may be weight related but try to set some that have nothing to do with weight as well. After all, life is bigger than just the number on the scale or the number on the tag of your clothes. It is a good idea to arrange your goals into short, medium and long term. 5. Start each day with purpose There is only one thing in life that you can never have more of and that is time. How you choose to spend your time is going to determine whether or not you ever get to live the life you dream of or not. Once you have your goals written down, you can then set daily intentions to help you achieve them. Start each day with purpose by selecting an affirmation or word that you will live by that day that will edge you closer to the life you want for yourself. http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/    
    Apr 16, 2018 124
  • 11 Mar 2018
    1. Eat High Protein Meals A high protein diet for weight loss is popular for a reason. It works. Protein is a macro-nutrient (along with carbohydrate and fat) that increases feeling of fullness. The golden rule of weight loss (particularly after weight loss surgery) is ‘Protein First’. Always choose the protein component of a meal first then add the veg/salad and finally a high fibre carbohydrate. The perfect portion of a protein food is about 90g. High protein foods include eggs, red meat, poultry, fish, nuts, seeds, legumes and dairy foods (yoghurt/milk/cheese). 2. Track Your Calories For weight loss, the average adult should stick to about 1200 calories per day. The easiest way to track this is to keep a food diary in an app that will calculate and track calories for you. While this can be time consuming and difficult to maintain long term; it is a great way to educate yourself about nutrition and your own dietary habits. Try tracking calories for the first month of weight loss then cut back to intermittent tracking for 7 days every 2-3 weeks. This is a self-monitoring tool that will keep you on track to achieving your goals and offers a nice alternative to fixating on the scales. 3. Avoid High Energy Drinks Liquid calories are a sure way to never reach goal weight, so pay just as close attention to what you’re drinking as to what you’re eating. High calorie fluids can be detrimental to weight loss because they don’t provide a proportional level of satiety to the energy consumed. For example drinking a fruit juice will not fill you to the same level as eating a tin of tuna, yet the fruit juice is higher in calories. Water is always the best fluid choice. Aim to drink 2-3L of plain water daily and limit high energy drinks such as fruit juice, alcohol, soft drink, sports drinks, energy drinks and protein shakes. 4. Eat Slowly Aim to take 20 minutes to finish every meal. Eating slowly allows you to better stay in touch with satiety cues. When eating quickly, it’s common to finish everything on the plate then feel overfull afterwards. Slowing down allows you to recognise feeling full before you reach stuffed full! This is an effective strategy for portion control without starving yourself and is crucial for those with a gastric band to ensure comfort at meal times. To slow down your speed of eating try timing yourself, using small cutlery, taking 10c piece bite sizes, chewing every mouthful to a paste before swallowing and sipping water between mouthfuls. 5. Exercise Daily You will not lose weight without exercising regularly. While it is true that 80% of weight loss is about the food, without exercise you’re more likely to struggle getting the food part right. The mindset and health benefits of exercise are undeniable. The best time of day to exercise is first thing in the morning, before breakfast and before excuses can get in the way.  Aim to exercise for 30 minutes daily comprising of a mix of cardio and resistance training (on different days). The hardest part of exercising is getting going. Once you’re out there it will always feel great. The sooner exercise becomes a non-negotiable part of your daily routine, the sooner you will see weight loss results. http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/        
    141 Posted by Winnett Specialist Group
  • 1. Eat High Protein Meals A high protein diet for weight loss is popular for a reason. It works. Protein is a macro-nutrient (along with carbohydrate and fat) that increases feeling of fullness. The golden rule of weight loss (particularly after weight loss surgery) is ‘Protein First’. Always choose the protein component of a meal first then add the veg/salad and finally a high fibre carbohydrate. The perfect portion of a protein food is about 90g. High protein foods include eggs, red meat, poultry, fish, nuts, seeds, legumes and dairy foods (yoghurt/milk/cheese). 2. Track Your Calories For weight loss, the average adult should stick to about 1200 calories per day. The easiest way to track this is to keep a food diary in an app that will calculate and track calories for you. While this can be time consuming and difficult to maintain long term; it is a great way to educate yourself about nutrition and your own dietary habits. Try tracking calories for the first month of weight loss then cut back to intermittent tracking for 7 days every 2-3 weeks. This is a self-monitoring tool that will keep you on track to achieving your goals and offers a nice alternative to fixating on the scales. 3. Avoid High Energy Drinks Liquid calories are a sure way to never reach goal weight, so pay just as close attention to what you’re drinking as to what you’re eating. High calorie fluids can be detrimental to weight loss because they don’t provide a proportional level of satiety to the energy consumed. For example drinking a fruit juice will not fill you to the same level as eating a tin of tuna, yet the fruit juice is higher in calories. Water is always the best fluid choice. Aim to drink 2-3L of plain water daily and limit high energy drinks such as fruit juice, alcohol, soft drink, sports drinks, energy drinks and protein shakes. 4. Eat Slowly Aim to take 20 minutes to finish every meal. Eating slowly allows you to better stay in touch with satiety cues. When eating quickly, it’s common to finish everything on the plate then feel overfull afterwards. Slowing down allows you to recognise feeling full before you reach stuffed full! This is an effective strategy for portion control without starving yourself and is crucial for those with a gastric band to ensure comfort at meal times. To slow down your speed of eating try timing yourself, using small cutlery, taking 10c piece bite sizes, chewing every mouthful to a paste before swallowing and sipping water between mouthfuls. 5. Exercise Daily You will not lose weight without exercising regularly. While it is true that 80% of weight loss is about the food, without exercise you’re more likely to struggle getting the food part right. The mindset and health benefits of exercise are undeniable. The best time of day to exercise is first thing in the morning, before breakfast and before excuses can get in the way.  Aim to exercise for 30 minutes daily comprising of a mix of cardio and resistance training (on different days). The hardest part of exercising is getting going. Once you’re out there it will always feel great. The sooner exercise becomes a non-negotiable part of your daily routine, the sooner you will see weight loss results. http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/        
    Mar 11, 2018 141
  • 15 Nov 2017
      Breakfast is the hardest meal of the day to eat after gastric band surgery.   There are many factors that work against a comfortable and enjoyable breakfast first thing in the morning. Often, appetite is poor, muscles are still waking up and mucous may have built up over the band forming what’s referred to as a ‘mucous plug’.  All of these things make skipping breakfast a very tempting option.   Skipping breakfast is delaying you from reaching your health and weight loss goals. Plus, it’s a missed opportunity to nourish your body.   These 10 yummy and nutritious meals are sure to inspire you to put brekky back on the menu!   Dietitian Tip: To reduce the risk of a blockage at breakfast, delay the meal until 10/10:30 am and be sure to sip a hot cup of herbal tea upon waking each day. As promised, here is your breakfast inspiration! Which one will you try first?   The Scramble Scramble 2 eggs with 2 diced cherry tomatoes and 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil. Add salt & pepper to taste. Serve with 1 cracker topped with 1 tablespoon of avocado   Mixed Berry Smoothie In a blender combine 1 cup of berries (fresh or frozen), ¼ cup natural yoghurt, ¼ cup skim milk, a drizzle of honey and 1 scoop (25g)  vanilla protein powder. Blend until combined.   Breakfast Bowl Chop ½ banana, 1 strawberry and 1 kiwi fruit into a bowl. Top with a dollop of Greek Natural yoghurt and a teaspoon of crushed almonds   Avocado Filled With Egg Halve a small avocado and remove the pip. Crack an egg into the space where the pip was, top with diced bacon or lean ham (optional). Bake in the oven until the egg is cooked to your liking and the bacon is crispy   Banana & Passionfruit Smoothie In a blender combine ½ ripe banana, 250ml skim milk, pulp of 1 passionfruit and a teaspoon of natural fibre such as from psyllium husk or Benefibre. Serve immediately with a little extra passionfruit pulp on top   Cheesy Omelette Beat 2 eggs in a mixing bowl, add 30g grated tasty cheese, a little cracked pepper, pinch of salt and a teaspoon of chopped fresh chives (optional). Heat a small non-stick pan on the stove and pour in the egg mixture, once the bottom is firm, fold the omelette in half and continue cooking until the middle is done to your liking. Serve immediately with some chopped fresh tomato   Chia ‘Toast’ 2 crackers (or 1 slice of well toasted rye bread, if tolerated) topped with 1 tablespoon of nut butter (try peanut or almond butter), sliced fresh banana and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon of chia seeds   Quinoa Porridge Cook ½ cup quinoa (per portion) in skim milk and water, as per packet instructions. Once the liquid is absorbed and the quinoa is soft, transfer the porridge to a bowl and top with crushed nuts, drizzle of honey, fresh berries and cinnamon   Jazzed Up Egg On Toast 1 thin slice of sourdough bread, well toasted with 1 poached egg, 1/4 avocado and 50g smoked salmon   Breakfast burrito 1 Mountain bread wrap filled with 2 scrambled eggs, 30g feta, sliced red capsicum (from jar) + shredded baby spinach leaves. Wrap and enjoy!   http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/
    155 Posted by Winnett Specialist Group
  •   Breakfast is the hardest meal of the day to eat after gastric band surgery.   There are many factors that work against a comfortable and enjoyable breakfast first thing in the morning. Often, appetite is poor, muscles are still waking up and mucous may have built up over the band forming what’s referred to as a ‘mucous plug’.  All of these things make skipping breakfast a very tempting option.   Skipping breakfast is delaying you from reaching your health and weight loss goals. Plus, it’s a missed opportunity to nourish your body.   These 10 yummy and nutritious meals are sure to inspire you to put brekky back on the menu!   Dietitian Tip: To reduce the risk of a blockage at breakfast, delay the meal until 10/10:30 am and be sure to sip a hot cup of herbal tea upon waking each day. As promised, here is your breakfast inspiration! Which one will you try first?   The Scramble Scramble 2 eggs with 2 diced cherry tomatoes and 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil. Add salt & pepper to taste. Serve with 1 cracker topped with 1 tablespoon of avocado   Mixed Berry Smoothie In a blender combine 1 cup of berries (fresh or frozen), ¼ cup natural yoghurt, ¼ cup skim milk, a drizzle of honey and 1 scoop (25g)  vanilla protein powder. Blend until combined.   Breakfast Bowl Chop ½ banana, 1 strawberry and 1 kiwi fruit into a bowl. Top with a dollop of Greek Natural yoghurt and a teaspoon of crushed almonds   Avocado Filled With Egg Halve a small avocado and remove the pip. Crack an egg into the space where the pip was, top with diced bacon or lean ham (optional). Bake in the oven until the egg is cooked to your liking and the bacon is crispy   Banana & Passionfruit Smoothie In a blender combine ½ ripe banana, 250ml skim milk, pulp of 1 passionfruit and a teaspoon of natural fibre such as from psyllium husk or Benefibre. Serve immediately with a little extra passionfruit pulp on top   Cheesy Omelette Beat 2 eggs in a mixing bowl, add 30g grated tasty cheese, a little cracked pepper, pinch of salt and a teaspoon of chopped fresh chives (optional). Heat a small non-stick pan on the stove and pour in the egg mixture, once the bottom is firm, fold the omelette in half and continue cooking until the middle is done to your liking. Serve immediately with some chopped fresh tomato   Chia ‘Toast’ 2 crackers (or 1 slice of well toasted rye bread, if tolerated) topped with 1 tablespoon of nut butter (try peanut or almond butter), sliced fresh banana and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon of chia seeds   Quinoa Porridge Cook ½ cup quinoa (per portion) in skim milk and water, as per packet instructions. Once the liquid is absorbed and the quinoa is soft, transfer the porridge to a bowl and top with crushed nuts, drizzle of honey, fresh berries and cinnamon   Jazzed Up Egg On Toast 1 thin slice of sourdough bread, well toasted with 1 poached egg, 1/4 avocado and 50g smoked salmon   Breakfast burrito 1 Mountain bread wrap filled with 2 scrambled eggs, 30g feta, sliced red capsicum (from jar) + shredded baby spinach leaves. Wrap and enjoy!   http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/
    Nov 15, 2017 155
  • 14 Nov 2017
    Vasectomy is a surgical procedure for male sterilization and/or permanent birth control. During the procedure, the vasa deferentia of a man are severed, and then tied/sealed in a manner such to prevent sperm from entering into the seminal stream (ejaculate). Vasectomy surgery is performed in a physician’s office or medical clinic.   There are several methods by which a surgeon might complete a vasectomy procedure, all of which occlude (seal) at least one side of each vas deferens. To help reduce anxiety and increase patient comfort, men who have an aversion to needles might opt for the “no-needle” application of anesthesia while the “no-scalpel” or “open-ended” techniques help to speed-up recovery times and increase the chance of healthy recovery.   Due to the simplicity of the surgery, a vasectomy usually takes less than 30 minutes to complete. After a short recovery at the doctor’s office (usually less than an hour), the patient is sent home to rest. Because the procedure is minimally invasive, many vasectomy patients find that they can resume their typical sexual behavior within a week, and do so with minimal discomfort.   Because the procedure is considered a permanent method of birth control (not easily reversed), men are usually counselled/advised to consider how the long-term outcome of a vasectomy might affect them both emotionally and physically.   http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/
    185 Posted by Winnett Specialist Group
  • Vasectomy is a surgical procedure for male sterilization and/or permanent birth control. During the procedure, the vasa deferentia of a man are severed, and then tied/sealed in a manner such to prevent sperm from entering into the seminal stream (ejaculate). Vasectomy surgery is performed in a physician’s office or medical clinic.   There are several methods by which a surgeon might complete a vasectomy procedure, all of which occlude (seal) at least one side of each vas deferens. To help reduce anxiety and increase patient comfort, men who have an aversion to needles might opt for the “no-needle” application of anesthesia while the “no-scalpel” or “open-ended” techniques help to speed-up recovery times and increase the chance of healthy recovery.   Due to the simplicity of the surgery, a vasectomy usually takes less than 30 minutes to complete. After a short recovery at the doctor’s office (usually less than an hour), the patient is sent home to rest. Because the procedure is minimally invasive, many vasectomy patients find that they can resume their typical sexual behavior within a week, and do so with minimal discomfort.   Because the procedure is considered a permanent method of birth control (not easily reversed), men are usually counselled/advised to consider how the long-term outcome of a vasectomy might affect them both emotionally and physically.   http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/
    Nov 14, 2017 185
  • 11 Sep 2017
    The cost of weight loss surgery may seem high but the cost of not having it is even higher   Weight loss surgery is the only proven solution to achieve sustainable weight loss, yet only 1.5% of suitable candidates are seeking surgery to combat their battle with obesity. This indicates that only 1.5% of obese adults in Australia are committed to improving their health, reducing their risk of disease and extending their life expectancy. Fear of social judgement, fear of failure and the cost involved, are just some of the reasons why so many are sticking to more conventional weight loss strategies and shying away from bariatric surgery. But are these valid reasons to put off having life changing surgery? . Recent research from Europe indicates they may not be valid at all; well at least the financial reasons may not be. Did you know that a BMI more than 35 incurs $3,000-$10,000 in annual health care costs? The true cost of delaying or not having bariatric surgery is two fold. There is the actual dollar value (as mentioned above) and there is the cost to the health status of the individual, where health status refers to the disease risk and life expectancy.   First, let’s take a look at disease risk.   Weight loss surgery is associated with an 11% reduction in heart attack risk and a 29% reduction in type 2 diabetes. It is also proven to help with sleep apnoea and mental health. But, delaying bariatric surgery by just three years may lead to a loss of clinical benefits and a reduced life expectancy. Research has shown that delaying weight loss surgery until BMI is over 50 can result in poorer health outcomes for the patient. There is fear that Australian’s are becoming de-sensitised to what obesity looks like. With 60% of the Australian population being overweight or obese, it’s easy to feel a healthy weight among society even when the BMI indicates otherwise. The reality is that the higher the BMI creeps the shorter the life expectancy and the lower the chances are of ever reversing existing weight related health conditions such as sleep apnoea and type 2 diabetes. One bariatric surgeon from the US has found that medically supervised diet, exercise and pharmacotherapy programs prior to bariatric surgery (that attempt to shed weight and educate patients) do not serve to prepare patients in any more of a useful way than the two week pre-operative VLCD does. These extended pre surgery interventions are delaying surgery and robbing patients of better health outcomes. The best outcomes are seen in those who have a BMI less then 40 at the time of surgery. These people are not only more likely to achieve a BMI under 30 but also comorbidity remission.   Now let’s look at the impact delaying surgery has on life expectancy.   A BMI over 30 results in a 50%-100% increased risk of premature death compared to individuals of healthy weight. Moderate obesity (BMI 30-35) reduces life expectancy by 3 years while morbid obesity (BMI over 40) reduces life expectancy by 10 years. It is true that the decision to have weight loss surgery will mean spending more money on items such as new clothing, dietary supplements, fitness and check up appointments. But significant cost savings will be noticed in food bills, medication and medical bills. One bariatric surgery patient has reported a saving of $8,400 per year on food bills alone. Bariatric surgery pays off in the long-term, money wise and health wise. If you just look at the dollar, research has now proven that bariatric surgery is cost effective at 10 years and cost saving over a lifetime. In light of this new research, now might be a good time to consider if you can really afford to put off having bariatric surgery any longer.   http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/
    159 Posted by Winnett Specialist Group
  • The cost of weight loss surgery may seem high but the cost of not having it is even higher   Weight loss surgery is the only proven solution to achieve sustainable weight loss, yet only 1.5% of suitable candidates are seeking surgery to combat their battle with obesity. This indicates that only 1.5% of obese adults in Australia are committed to improving their health, reducing their risk of disease and extending their life expectancy. Fear of social judgement, fear of failure and the cost involved, are just some of the reasons why so many are sticking to more conventional weight loss strategies and shying away from bariatric surgery. But are these valid reasons to put off having life changing surgery? . Recent research from Europe indicates they may not be valid at all; well at least the financial reasons may not be. Did you know that a BMI more than 35 incurs $3,000-$10,000 in annual health care costs? The true cost of delaying or not having bariatric surgery is two fold. There is the actual dollar value (as mentioned above) and there is the cost to the health status of the individual, where health status refers to the disease risk and life expectancy.   First, let’s take a look at disease risk.   Weight loss surgery is associated with an 11% reduction in heart attack risk and a 29% reduction in type 2 diabetes. It is also proven to help with sleep apnoea and mental health. But, delaying bariatric surgery by just three years may lead to a loss of clinical benefits and a reduced life expectancy. Research has shown that delaying weight loss surgery until BMI is over 50 can result in poorer health outcomes for the patient. There is fear that Australian’s are becoming de-sensitised to what obesity looks like. With 60% of the Australian population being overweight or obese, it’s easy to feel a healthy weight among society even when the BMI indicates otherwise. The reality is that the higher the BMI creeps the shorter the life expectancy and the lower the chances are of ever reversing existing weight related health conditions such as sleep apnoea and type 2 diabetes. One bariatric surgeon from the US has found that medically supervised diet, exercise and pharmacotherapy programs prior to bariatric surgery (that attempt to shed weight and educate patients) do not serve to prepare patients in any more of a useful way than the two week pre-operative VLCD does. These extended pre surgery interventions are delaying surgery and robbing patients of better health outcomes. The best outcomes are seen in those who have a BMI less then 40 at the time of surgery. These people are not only more likely to achieve a BMI under 30 but also comorbidity remission.   Now let’s look at the impact delaying surgery has on life expectancy.   A BMI over 30 results in a 50%-100% increased risk of premature death compared to individuals of healthy weight. Moderate obesity (BMI 30-35) reduces life expectancy by 3 years while morbid obesity (BMI over 40) reduces life expectancy by 10 years. It is true that the decision to have weight loss surgery will mean spending more money on items such as new clothing, dietary supplements, fitness and check up appointments. But significant cost savings will be noticed in food bills, medication and medical bills. One bariatric surgery patient has reported a saving of $8,400 per year on food bills alone. Bariatric surgery pays off in the long-term, money wise and health wise. If you just look at the dollar, research has now proven that bariatric surgery is cost effective at 10 years and cost saving over a lifetime. In light of this new research, now might be a good time to consider if you can really afford to put off having bariatric surgery any longer.   http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/
    Sep 11, 2017 159
  • 19 Jul 2017
    The thought of having surgery to achieve sustainable weight loss is, for a lot of people, scary and confronting. The perception that it’s ‘too extreme’ an intervention for you to consider, could be stopping you from getting the treatment you need to reach your health goals.   Weight loss surgery should be an option on the table, alongside other weight loss tools, as it could be the one that’s the best fit for you. Let’s take a look at 8 compelling reasons why weight loss surgery could be the right choice for you: Long-Term Weight Loss Did you know that 95% of individuals who lose weight by dieting and exercising return to their start weight, or lower within 2 years? Weight loss surgery has been proven to be the only effective treatment to combat severe obesity and maintain weight loss long-term. Studies have found that 90% of individuals maintain 50% or more of their excess weight loss after bariatric surgery. If you have tried diet after diet and know what it feels like to be part of the 95% of whom diets have failed, weight loss surgery could be your ticket out of the this vicious cycle. Increased Energy Levels Carrying a little extra weight is a risk factor for sleep apnoea and in itself can zap your energy levels. After weight loss surgery, many individuals find that their sleep apnoea disappears as a result of the significant weight loss experienced. Imagine what it would feel like to wake up in the morning feeling refreshed and full of energy after a good nights sleep. Improved Life Expectancy Do you have type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure or poor heart health? Weight loss surgery has been shown to improve all of these conditions and more. In fact, individuals who have had weight loss surgery experience an 89% reduction in mortality (early death.) Possibly one of the most remarkable outcomes of weight loss surgery is it’s potential to achieve remission of type 2 diabetes. Controlled Appetite If big portions and feeling hungry all the time are your main barriers for achieving sustainable weight loss then bariatric surgery could be a good fit for you. There are several different types of weight loss surgeries including Gastric Banding, Gastric Sleeve and Gastric Bypass however all will control appetite and reduce portion sizes. A Weight Loss Tool That’s With You For Life Unlike a diet that starts and stops, weight loss surgery is with you for life. As you would know, keeping weight off is hard. It’s even harder when your doing it alone, once the diet has ended and there is nothing and no one there to support you. A good way to think about weight loss surgery is that it’s a permanent tool there to help you. If you can put in the effort to learn how to work with it, you will be rewarded time and time again for the rest of your life. Take Less Medications Taking a cocktail of medications each day doesn’t have to be a part of your future. Weight loss surgery is so effective at improving health outcomes that many individuals find they no long need to take some medications, while the dosages of others are significantly reduced. Improved Quality Of Life Increased mobility, reduced joint pain, reduction in depression & anxiety, improved social experiences, better sexual performance, higher self esteem, increased confidence and improved fertility are just some of the many ways that weight loss surgery improves quality of life. Enjoy Feeling Satisfied On Less Of All Your Favourite Foods It is a myth that you cannot enjoy favourite foods after weight loss surgery, in fact dieting discouraged. A normal and healthy post-operative diet is one that includes a wide variety of fresh foods as well as a few indulgences. Weight loss surgery can help you to achieve what diets and willpower never could. That is, to enjoy favourite foods in moderation without going back for more. To learn more about weight loss surgery and if it is the right choice for you, contact Winnett Specialist Group on 03 9417 1555 to arrange an obligation free appointment today. http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/    
    173 Posted by Winnett Specialist Group
  • The thought of having surgery to achieve sustainable weight loss is, for a lot of people, scary and confronting. The perception that it’s ‘too extreme’ an intervention for you to consider, could be stopping you from getting the treatment you need to reach your health goals.   Weight loss surgery should be an option on the table, alongside other weight loss tools, as it could be the one that’s the best fit for you. Let’s take a look at 8 compelling reasons why weight loss surgery could be the right choice for you: Long-Term Weight Loss Did you know that 95% of individuals who lose weight by dieting and exercising return to their start weight, or lower within 2 years? Weight loss surgery has been proven to be the only effective treatment to combat severe obesity and maintain weight loss long-term. Studies have found that 90% of individuals maintain 50% or more of their excess weight loss after bariatric surgery. If you have tried diet after diet and know what it feels like to be part of the 95% of whom diets have failed, weight loss surgery could be your ticket out of the this vicious cycle. Increased Energy Levels Carrying a little extra weight is a risk factor for sleep apnoea and in itself can zap your energy levels. After weight loss surgery, many individuals find that their sleep apnoea disappears as a result of the significant weight loss experienced. Imagine what it would feel like to wake up in the morning feeling refreshed and full of energy after a good nights sleep. Improved Life Expectancy Do you have type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure or poor heart health? Weight loss surgery has been shown to improve all of these conditions and more. In fact, individuals who have had weight loss surgery experience an 89% reduction in mortality (early death.) Possibly one of the most remarkable outcomes of weight loss surgery is it’s potential to achieve remission of type 2 diabetes. Controlled Appetite If big portions and feeling hungry all the time are your main barriers for achieving sustainable weight loss then bariatric surgery could be a good fit for you. There are several different types of weight loss surgeries including Gastric Banding, Gastric Sleeve and Gastric Bypass however all will control appetite and reduce portion sizes. A Weight Loss Tool That’s With You For Life Unlike a diet that starts and stops, weight loss surgery is with you for life. As you would know, keeping weight off is hard. It’s even harder when your doing it alone, once the diet has ended and there is nothing and no one there to support you. A good way to think about weight loss surgery is that it’s a permanent tool there to help you. If you can put in the effort to learn how to work with it, you will be rewarded time and time again for the rest of your life. Take Less Medications Taking a cocktail of medications each day doesn’t have to be a part of your future. Weight loss surgery is so effective at improving health outcomes that many individuals find they no long need to take some medications, while the dosages of others are significantly reduced. Improved Quality Of Life Increased mobility, reduced joint pain, reduction in depression & anxiety, improved social experiences, better sexual performance, higher self esteem, increased confidence and improved fertility are just some of the many ways that weight loss surgery improves quality of life. Enjoy Feeling Satisfied On Less Of All Your Favourite Foods It is a myth that you cannot enjoy favourite foods after weight loss surgery, in fact dieting discouraged. A normal and healthy post-operative diet is one that includes a wide variety of fresh foods as well as a few indulgences. Weight loss surgery can help you to achieve what diets and willpower never could. That is, to enjoy favourite foods in moderation without going back for more. To learn more about weight loss surgery and if it is the right choice for you, contact Winnett Specialist Group on 03 9417 1555 to arrange an obligation free appointment today. http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/    
    Jul 19, 2017 173
  • 17 May 2017
    To get the best from your lap band procedure, you need to be aware of the different zones – it will help you in reaching your weight loss and health improvement goals. Always listen to your body and maintain regular contact with us if you’re concerned, we are here to help. The Yellow Zone Symptoms: Eating big meals Not being satisfied after eating small healthy meals Struggling to lose any weight If you’re experiencing above, it’s most likely that your band is too loose. Contact us quickly for an adjustment, as any delay might result in weight regain. The Green Zone Symptoms: Being satisfied with small meals Early and prolonged satiety No snacking Significant weight loss No vomiting This is the optimal zone for weight loss. The Red Zone Symptoms: Reflux and heartburn Pain whilst eating Difficulty swallowing Vomiting If you experience any of these symptoms, your lap band is probably too tight. Get in touch with us for an adjustment and act quickly as vomiting might cause pouch dilatation and band slippage – which then causes snacking and weight regain. You should definitely not be vomiting after the procedure. If you have a  band and you’re not in the green zone, get in touch with us – we will adjust the band to make sure you get the most of its benefits. Your weight loss and the improvement in your health is the aim of our clinic and we’re here to support you every step of the way. http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/
    211 Posted by Winnett Specialist Group
  • To get the best from your lap band procedure, you need to be aware of the different zones – it will help you in reaching your weight loss and health improvement goals. Always listen to your body and maintain regular contact with us if you’re concerned, we are here to help. The Yellow Zone Symptoms: Eating big meals Not being satisfied after eating small healthy meals Struggling to lose any weight If you’re experiencing above, it’s most likely that your band is too loose. Contact us quickly for an adjustment, as any delay might result in weight regain. The Green Zone Symptoms: Being satisfied with small meals Early and prolonged satiety No snacking Significant weight loss No vomiting This is the optimal zone for weight loss. The Red Zone Symptoms: Reflux and heartburn Pain whilst eating Difficulty swallowing Vomiting If you experience any of these symptoms, your lap band is probably too tight. Get in touch with us for an adjustment and act quickly as vomiting might cause pouch dilatation and band slippage – which then causes snacking and weight regain. You should definitely not be vomiting after the procedure. If you have a  band and you’re not in the green zone, get in touch with us – we will adjust the band to make sure you get the most of its benefits. Your weight loss and the improvement in your health is the aim of our clinic and we’re here to support you every step of the way. http://winnettspecialistgroup.com.au/
    May 17, 2017 211