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At least 27 feared dead in Myanmar jade mine landslide
myanmar newsWith few regulations and little oversight, conditions in jade mines in Kachin state are often dangerous, especially during the rainy season

At least 27 people are feared dead following a landslide at a jade mine in northern Myanmar, police said Wednesday, as heavy rains hampered the search for survivors.

The poorly-regulated and notoriously corrupt multibillion-dollar industry in remote Kachin state is frequently hit by fatal disasters, and the victims often come from poor ethnic communities.

The latest disaster hit remote Set Mu sub-township early Tuesday following heavy rains in the area, burying at least 27 people, mostly from the impoverished ethnic Rawang group, local police officer Aung Zin Kyaw told AFP.

"We haven't found any dead bodies yet. We will search again today with the Red Cross and fire brigade," he said.

With only about 70,000 members, the mainly-Christian Rawang are one of Myanmar's smallest ethnic groups and live predominantly in the mountainous north, with many employed in the informal mining sector.

With few regulations and little oversight in the hugely profitable sector -- mostly fuelled by soaring Chinese demand -- conditions are often dangerous, especially during the wet months.

"Before the rainy season, the people looking for jade were destroying the land. Now it is raining and the ground is not stable and very muddy," local resident Shwe Thein told AFP Wednesday.

Dozens of people have been killed by landslides this year in the Hpakant region of Kachin state, where a major incident in November 2015 left more than 100 dead.

Watchdog Global Witness estimated that the jade industry was worth some $31 billion in 2014, a huge proportion of which did not reach state coffers.

Jade and other natural resources, including timber, gold and amber, help finance burma news both sides in a decades-long conflict between ethnic Kachin rebels and the military as they battle to control the mines and the income they bring.

Since a 17-year ceasefire broke down in 2011, more than 100,000 people have been displaced due to the fighting, many multiple times.

Civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi said on coming to power in 2016 that ending the country's myriad conflicts was her myanmar news top priority but an ongoing peace process is yet to yield any significant results.

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9 blogs
  • 21 Aug 2018
    Specialist maternity nurses have been deployed to Bangladesh to help pregnant Rohingya rape victims.Almost 700,000 Rohingya refugees have fled neighbouring burma news since last August amid reports of extreme violence, forming a total of more than 900,000 displaced people in the numerous sprawling camps.The Government estimates that around 16,000 women in camps in Bangladesh are currently expecting or have given birth.A Rohingya refugee camp, where many woman are pregnant after being raped (Jemma Crew/PA)SNP MP Carol Monaghan, speaking in the Commons, called on the Government to step in and offer support.She said: ?Last August myanmar news soldiers systematically brutalised and raped young Rohingya women, nine months on and in the middle of the monsoon season many of these young girls are now giving birth to the babies conceived as a result of the rape.?As these girls are often shunned by their communities what support is the UK Government providing to these vulnerable girls and their babies??Foreign Office Minister Alistair Burt responded: ?We?ve deployed specialist maternity workers to be there, in addition we are working with our partners to support Rohingya women who were raped and are pregnant.?The deployment includes training of medical specialists, psychosocial support, clinical management of rape, emergency obstetric care and this has all been provided despite the difficulties of monsoon and other circumstances.?Mr Burt, speaking during international development questions, also assured MPs that ?as much as possible was being done? to vaccinate Rohingya refugees against chorea, measles and diphtheria, which are ?the most common diseases in the camps?.He added: ?It is very much on people?s minds at such a vulnerable time.?Advertisement
    263 Posted by Eldon Board
  • Specialist maternity nurses have been deployed to Bangladesh to help pregnant Rohingya rape victims.Almost 700,000 Rohingya refugees have fled neighbouring burma news since last August amid reports of extreme violence, forming a total of more than 900,000 displaced people in the numerous sprawling camps.The Government estimates that around 16,000 women in camps in Bangladesh are currently expecting or have given birth.A Rohingya refugee camp, where many woman are pregnant after being raped (Jemma Crew/PA)SNP MP Carol Monaghan, speaking in the Commons, called on the Government to step in and offer support.She said: ?Last August myanmar news soldiers systematically brutalised and raped young Rohingya women, nine months on and in the middle of the monsoon season many of these young girls are now giving birth to the babies conceived as a result of the rape.?As these girls are often shunned by their communities what support is the UK Government providing to these vulnerable girls and their babies??Foreign Office Minister Alistair Burt responded: ?We?ve deployed specialist maternity workers to be there, in addition we are working with our partners to support Rohingya women who were raped and are pregnant.?The deployment includes training of medical specialists, psychosocial support, clinical management of rape, emergency obstetric care and this has all been provided despite the difficulties of monsoon and other circumstances.?Mr Burt, speaking during international development questions, also assured MPs that ?as much as possible was being done? to vaccinate Rohingya refugees against chorea, measles and diphtheria, which are ?the most common diseases in the camps?.He added: ?It is very much on people?s minds at such a vulnerable time.?Advertisement
    Aug 21, 2018 263
  • 20 Aug 2018
    With few regulations and little oversight, conditions in jade mines in Kachin state are often dangerous, especially during the rainy seasonAt least 27 people are feared dead following a landslide at a jade mine in northern Myanmar, police said Wednesday, as heavy rains hampered the search for survivors.The poorly-regulated and notoriously corrupt multibillion-dollar industry in remote Kachin state is frequently hit by fatal disasters, and the victims often come from poor ethnic communities.The latest disaster hit remote Set Mu sub-township early Tuesday following heavy rains in the area, burying at least 27 people, mostly from the impoverished ethnic Rawang group, local police officer Aung Zin Kyaw told AFP."We haven't found any dead bodies yet. We will search again today with the Red Cross and fire brigade," he said.With only about 70,000 members, the mainly-Christian Rawang are one of Myanmar's smallest ethnic groups and live predominantly in the mountainous north, with many employed in the informal mining sector.With few regulations and little oversight in the hugely profitable sector -- mostly fuelled by soaring Chinese demand -- conditions are often dangerous, especially during the wet months."Before the rainy season, the people looking for jade were destroying the land. Now it is raining and the ground is not stable and very muddy," local resident Shwe Thein told AFP Wednesday.Dozens of people have been killed by landslides this year in the Hpakant region of Kachin state, where a major incident in November 2015 left more than 100 dead.Watchdog Global Witness estimated that the jade industry was worth some $31 billion in 2014, a huge proportion of which did not reach state coffers.Jade and other natural resources, including timber, gold and amber, help finance burma news both sides in a decades-long conflict between ethnic Kachin rebels and the military as they battle to control the mines and the income they bring.Since a 17-year ceasefire broke down in 2011, more than 100,000 people have been displaced due to the fighting, many multiple times.Civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi said on coming to power in 2016 that ending the country's myriad conflicts was her myanmar news top priority but an ongoing peace process is yet to yield any significant results.Advertisement
    250 Posted by Eldon Board
  • With few regulations and little oversight, conditions in jade mines in Kachin state are often dangerous, especially during the rainy seasonAt least 27 people are feared dead following a landslide at a jade mine in northern Myanmar, police said Wednesday, as heavy rains hampered the search for survivors.The poorly-regulated and notoriously corrupt multibillion-dollar industry in remote Kachin state is frequently hit by fatal disasters, and the victims often come from poor ethnic communities.The latest disaster hit remote Set Mu sub-township early Tuesday following heavy rains in the area, burying at least 27 people, mostly from the impoverished ethnic Rawang group, local police officer Aung Zin Kyaw told AFP."We haven't found any dead bodies yet. We will search again today with the Red Cross and fire brigade," he said.With only about 70,000 members, the mainly-Christian Rawang are one of Myanmar's smallest ethnic groups and live predominantly in the mountainous north, with many employed in the informal mining sector.With few regulations and little oversight in the hugely profitable sector -- mostly fuelled by soaring Chinese demand -- conditions are often dangerous, especially during the wet months."Before the rainy season, the people looking for jade were destroying the land. Now it is raining and the ground is not stable and very muddy," local resident Shwe Thein told AFP Wednesday.Dozens of people have been killed by landslides this year in the Hpakant region of Kachin state, where a major incident in November 2015 left more than 100 dead.Watchdog Global Witness estimated that the jade industry was worth some $31 billion in 2014, a huge proportion of which did not reach state coffers.Jade and other natural resources, including timber, gold and amber, help finance burma news both sides in a decades-long conflict between ethnic Kachin rebels and the military as they battle to control the mines and the income they bring.Since a 17-year ceasefire broke down in 2011, more than 100,000 people have been displaced due to the fighting, many multiple times.Civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi said on coming to power in 2016 that ending the country's myriad conflicts was her myanmar news top priority but an ongoing peace process is yet to yield any significant results.Advertisement
    Aug 20, 2018 250
  • 20 Aug 2018
    UNITED NATIONS (AP) - The U.N. human rights chief defended his outspoken criticism of abuses in dozens of countries from Myanmar and Hungary to the United States, insisting that his office doesn't "bring shame on governments, they shame themselves."Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein stressed at a farewell burma news conference at U.N. headquarters on Thursday that "silence does not earn you any respect - none."Looking back at his four-year term as U.N. high commissioner for human rights, the Jordanian prince said he will give his successor the same advice his predecessor, Navi Pillay, gave him - "be fair and don't discriminate against any country" and "just come out swinging."FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2018, file photo, U.N. human rights chief Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein pauses during a press conference in Jakarta, Indonesia. Zeid defended his outspoken criticism of rights abuses in dozens of countries from Myanmar and Hungary to the United States on Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, insisting that his office doesn't "bring shame on governments, they shame themselves." Zeid stressed at a farewell press conference at U.N. headquarters that "silence does not earn you any respect - none." (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara, File)Zeid said he leaves the Geneva-based post on Aug. 31 very concerned about populism, intolerance and oppression "becoming fashionable again.""It all builds because once you start down the path of intolerance, it's very difficult to stop it, unless at the end of the day you have conflict," he said.Zeid said the question he has been asking populist leaders in Hungary, Poland and Austria - who are making political gains thanks in part to their opposition to mass migration - is where do they want to see their countries in 2030.If the trend is going to be "increasing authoritarianism" where countries pursue individual agendas, he said those burma news agendas will collide "and eventually we have what we've already seen in the 20th century."Zeid recalled that it took 100 million lives lost through two world wars, the Holocaust and the Spanish influenza epidemic "to drive humanity to the point where it recognized that it had to begin to do things differently." That led to the formation of the United Nations where countries would try to solve problems together, "not at the expense of one another," he said.But if the populists are allowed into "this space," Zeid said, "I think we're in very perilous waters."He was highly critical of militant attacks, but stressed that "the world is not going to break because of these terrorist outrages.""It will break because of the overreaction or the exploitation of this agenda by governments," Zeid said.He cited as an example a study by the U.N. Development Program on recruitment by armed groups in northern Mali that found 70 percent of respondents said the major cause was excessive use of force by security forces."We have to put up a mirror before all governments," he said. "They shame themselves when they deprive their people of their basic necessities for a dignified life. They shame themselves when they discriminate against parts of their communities. They shame themselves when they stoke fear and make people fear that they have to bend to the will of the government or face consequences.""If an election has been stolen, rigged, by a corrupt government and then they claim that I can't say anything because I violate their sovereignty, whose sovereignty?" Zeid asked. "Sovereignty always lies with the people. It's exercised by government on people's behalf."Zeid said governments put a lot of pressure on him and his office, but "the real pressure comes from the victims" whose human rights have been violated in Syria, Iraq, Congo and many other countries "because you know the limitations of what you can do."The most meaningful part of his work is stopping an execution, getting someone who has been detained for years released, and successfully pushing for human rights adherence - and then receiving a letter of thanks from the family or the individual."We have to speak, and we have to engage," Zeid said, even if it poses difficulties for other U.N. colleagues including Secretary-General Antonio Guterres."Sometimes we make mistakes and I have apologized publicly to governments," he said. But "if I'm going to make a mistake, I'd rather make the mistake speaking out and not regretting that I didn't say anything when I should have said something."Zeid cited human rights investigations the Human Rights Council has authorized in Syria, myanmar news, Yemen, and most recently in Venezuela and Nicaragua.But he said his greatest success has been demanding access for rights officials. He said when access is barred, including in Myanmar's Rakhine state where about 700,000 Rohingya Muslims lived before fleeing a violent military crackdown last year, and Venezuela, he asks: "What are they hiding?"The United States pulled out of the Human Rights Council in June, citing "chronic bias against Israel.""I think we've been fair with everyone and firm with everyone," Zeid said. "The suggestion that I'm an anti-Semite and my office is, I find it really disgusting."As for President Donald Trump, Zeid again denounced his repeated attacks on the media.He said that he felt as if "all of us, humanity, were at the back of a bus and the president was driving the bus, and we're careening down a mountain road with steep cliffs on either side, and there is this sense that as one of the principal leaders of the world not knowing clearly where he wants to take us. What is his end point?"He said he didn't seek a second term because the five permanent members of the Security Council - the U.S., Russia, China, Britain and France - need to give their approval and he knew a long time ago that he wouldn't have the support of at least three and probably all of them, "which I was happy about.""I have no regrets that I've said what I said," Zeid said. "I think I've tried my best and I hope others will see that at certain times the U.N. needs to speak."Several candidates for the job reached out for advice, and Zeid said he told them that "it's an extremely meaningful job - the most meaningful job I've ever had - but very trying as well, and that they shouldn't think of it if their health is not perfect."Advertisement
    134 Posted by Eldon Board
  • UNITED NATIONS (AP) - The U.N. human rights chief defended his outspoken criticism of abuses in dozens of countries from Myanmar and Hungary to the United States, insisting that his office doesn't "bring shame on governments, they shame themselves."Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein stressed at a farewell burma news conference at U.N. headquarters on Thursday that "silence does not earn you any respect - none."Looking back at his four-year term as U.N. high commissioner for human rights, the Jordanian prince said he will give his successor the same advice his predecessor, Navi Pillay, gave him - "be fair and don't discriminate against any country" and "just come out swinging."FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2018, file photo, U.N. human rights chief Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein pauses during a press conference in Jakarta, Indonesia. Zeid defended his outspoken criticism of rights abuses in dozens of countries from Myanmar and Hungary to the United States on Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, insisting that his office doesn't "bring shame on governments, they shame themselves." Zeid stressed at a farewell press conference at U.N. headquarters that "silence does not earn you any respect - none." (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara, File)Zeid said he leaves the Geneva-based post on Aug. 31 very concerned about populism, intolerance and oppression "becoming fashionable again.""It all builds because once you start down the path of intolerance, it's very difficult to stop it, unless at the end of the day you have conflict," he said.Zeid said the question he has been asking populist leaders in Hungary, Poland and Austria - who are making political gains thanks in part to their opposition to mass migration - is where do they want to see their countries in 2030.If the trend is going to be "increasing authoritarianism" where countries pursue individual agendas, he said those burma news agendas will collide "and eventually we have what we've already seen in the 20th century."Zeid recalled that it took 100 million lives lost through two world wars, the Holocaust and the Spanish influenza epidemic "to drive humanity to the point where it recognized that it had to begin to do things differently." That led to the formation of the United Nations where countries would try to solve problems together, "not at the expense of one another," he said.But if the populists are allowed into "this space," Zeid said, "I think we're in very perilous waters."He was highly critical of militant attacks, but stressed that "the world is not going to break because of these terrorist outrages.""It will break because of the overreaction or the exploitation of this agenda by governments," Zeid said.He cited as an example a study by the U.N. Development Program on recruitment by armed groups in northern Mali that found 70 percent of respondents said the major cause was excessive use of force by security forces."We have to put up a mirror before all governments," he said. "They shame themselves when they deprive their people of their basic necessities for a dignified life. They shame themselves when they discriminate against parts of their communities. They shame themselves when they stoke fear and make people fear that they have to bend to the will of the government or face consequences.""If an election has been stolen, rigged, by a corrupt government and then they claim that I can't say anything because I violate their sovereignty, whose sovereignty?" Zeid asked. "Sovereignty always lies with the people. It's exercised by government on people's behalf."Zeid said governments put a lot of pressure on him and his office, but "the real pressure comes from the victims" whose human rights have been violated in Syria, Iraq, Congo and many other countries "because you know the limitations of what you can do."The most meaningful part of his work is stopping an execution, getting someone who has been detained for years released, and successfully pushing for human rights adherence - and then receiving a letter of thanks from the family or the individual."We have to speak, and we have to engage," Zeid said, even if it poses difficulties for other U.N. colleagues including Secretary-General Antonio Guterres."Sometimes we make mistakes and I have apologized publicly to governments," he said. But "if I'm going to make a mistake, I'd rather make the mistake speaking out and not regretting that I didn't say anything when I should have said something."Zeid cited human rights investigations the Human Rights Council has authorized in Syria, myanmar news, Yemen, and most recently in Venezuela and Nicaragua.But he said his greatest success has been demanding access for rights officials. He said when access is barred, including in Myanmar's Rakhine state where about 700,000 Rohingya Muslims lived before fleeing a violent military crackdown last year, and Venezuela, he asks: "What are they hiding?"The United States pulled out of the Human Rights Council in June, citing "chronic bias against Israel.""I think we've been fair with everyone and firm with everyone," Zeid said. "The suggestion that I'm an anti-Semite and my office is, I find it really disgusting."As for President Donald Trump, Zeid again denounced his repeated attacks on the media.He said that he felt as if "all of us, humanity, were at the back of a bus and the president was driving the bus, and we're careening down a mountain road with steep cliffs on either side, and there is this sense that as one of the principal leaders of the world not knowing clearly where he wants to take us. What is his end point?"He said he didn't seek a second term because the five permanent members of the Security Council - the U.S., Russia, China, Britain and France - need to give their approval and he knew a long time ago that he wouldn't have the support of at least three and probably all of them, "which I was happy about.""I have no regrets that I've said what I said," Zeid said. "I think I've tried my best and I hope others will see that at certain times the U.N. needs to speak."Several candidates for the job reached out for advice, and Zeid said he told them that "it's an extremely meaningful job - the most meaningful job I've ever had - but very trying as well, and that they shouldn't think of it if their health is not perfect."Advertisement
    Aug 20, 2018 134
  • 20 Aug 2018
    India is a country with a huge population so there are always things happening around the nations which on gets to know about with help of news. Indian politics, sports, natural disaster, entertainment, and many other events are the main focus of news in India. Many magazines give away information about the entity of system of Politics which develops curiosity among people. Many newspapers have their front page bearing latest political news. The international and national news always has some element of political myanmar news in it. But every nation has a different political background and history. Hence, the political issue shows variations depending on the various pieces of land. The Political news India is just a medium of delivering the political views of various people in the country.burma news gives away information about society, state, country, sports and even entertainment. The news about financial matter like budget, policy and bills etc. are also delivered by the India news. When the budget is announced the news channels makes an effort to spread the message about the governments act towards society and make the society well aware about it. The political news also makes people aware of the economic growth of various other countries and also their position in the market. The latest political news India sometimes is of very interest and so make up to the headlines of the world news. Whenever a foreign delegate comes to India in order to improve their relations with the country the news is covered by the agencies and it is conveyed to the general public. People always feel the need to be updated with the daily happenings around them. The latest political news helps them to know about the political activities going around the world.The political activities that go around in our country always make it to the world news. Many People prefer to know about the world's political news instead just being aware of the political happenings in the country. This political myanmar news India creates an image of the country in the minds of other people. It may be positive it negative depending upon the political news that is telecasted. Developing a positive image is very important as that decides the reputation of the country. There are many ad campaigns conducted for the citizens of India in which they are taught manners to build a positive image of country. In many countries political moments of country are telecasted which includes various moments of Loksabha's question hour.
    152 Posted by Eldon Board
  • India is a country with a huge population so there are always things happening around the nations which on gets to know about with help of news. Indian politics, sports, natural disaster, entertainment, and many other events are the main focus of news in India. Many magazines give away information about the entity of system of Politics which develops curiosity among people. Many newspapers have their front page bearing latest political news. The international and national news always has some element of political myanmar news in it. But every nation has a different political background and history. Hence, the political issue shows variations depending on the various pieces of land. The Political news India is just a medium of delivering the political views of various people in the country.burma news gives away information about society, state, country, sports and even entertainment. The news about financial matter like budget, policy and bills etc. are also delivered by the India news. When the budget is announced the news channels makes an effort to spread the message about the governments act towards society and make the society well aware about it. The political news also makes people aware of the economic growth of various other countries and also their position in the market. The latest political news India sometimes is of very interest and so make up to the headlines of the world news. Whenever a foreign delegate comes to India in order to improve their relations with the country the news is covered by the agencies and it is conveyed to the general public. People always feel the need to be updated with the daily happenings around them. The latest political news helps them to know about the political activities going around the world.The political activities that go around in our country always make it to the world news. Many People prefer to know about the world's political news instead just being aware of the political happenings in the country. This political myanmar news India creates an image of the country in the minds of other people. It may be positive it negative depending upon the political news that is telecasted. Developing a positive image is very important as that decides the reputation of the country. There are many ad campaigns conducted for the citizens of India in which they are taught manners to build a positive image of country. In many countries political moments of country are telecasted which includes various moments of Loksabha's question hour.
    Aug 20, 2018 152
  • 16 Aug 2018
    By Sam Aung MoonYANGON, July 26 (Reuters) - Authorities in northern myanmar news recovered eight bodies on Thursday after a landslide that engulfed 27 small-scale miners, an official said, the latest disaster to hit a centre of the Southeast Asian nation's lucrative jade trade.A search was continuing for others trapped or washed away when muddy earth slid from a cliff on Monday, but authorities were not expecting to find any of the miners alive, said fire brigade official Aye Thein, who was leading the search in the jade mining region of Hpakant in Kachin state.Aye Thein said the bodies of eight people had been recovered from water near the site of Monday's landslide, while others would need to be dug out of the rubble with excavators brought to the site on Tuesday.The recovered bodies are "badly deformed. They are already rotten," he said. "Others are still buried under the soil."Kyaw Swar Aung, administrator of Hpakant, said six of the bodies had already been collected by family members.Officials said the miners had come from nearby villages to pick through tailings for jade at a defunct mine, despite safety warnings.Deadly landslides are frequent in Hpakant during Myanmar?s rainy season from May to October. They frequently bury informal scavengers, or handpickers, who scour large piles of earth for jade.Another large landslide on July 14 killed at least 15 people and injured 45.myanmar news's jade industry is notoriously opaque, but advocacy group Global Witness estimated the trade was worth $31 billion in 2014. Experts say most of the stones are smuggled to neighbouring China. (Reporting by Sam Aung Moon; Editing by Simon Lewis and Richard Borsuk)Advertisement
    154 Posted by Eldon Board
  • By Sam Aung MoonYANGON, July 26 (Reuters) - Authorities in northern myanmar news recovered eight bodies on Thursday after a landslide that engulfed 27 small-scale miners, an official said, the latest disaster to hit a centre of the Southeast Asian nation's lucrative jade trade.A search was continuing for others trapped or washed away when muddy earth slid from a cliff on Monday, but authorities were not expecting to find any of the miners alive, said fire brigade official Aye Thein, who was leading the search in the jade mining region of Hpakant in Kachin state.Aye Thein said the bodies of eight people had been recovered from water near the site of Monday's landslide, while others would need to be dug out of the rubble with excavators brought to the site on Tuesday.The recovered bodies are "badly deformed. They are already rotten," he said. "Others are still buried under the soil."Kyaw Swar Aung, administrator of Hpakant, said six of the bodies had already been collected by family members.Officials said the miners had come from nearby villages to pick through tailings for jade at a defunct mine, despite safety warnings.Deadly landslides are frequent in Hpakant during Myanmar?s rainy season from May to October. They frequently bury informal scavengers, or handpickers, who scour large piles of earth for jade.Another large landslide on July 14 killed at least 15 people and injured 45.myanmar news's jade industry is notoriously opaque, but advocacy group Global Witness estimated the trade was worth $31 billion in 2014. Experts say most of the stones are smuggled to neighbouring China. (Reporting by Sam Aung Moon; Editing by Simon Lewis and Richard Borsuk)Advertisement
    Aug 16, 2018 154
  • 16 Aug 2018
    By Shoon Naing and Thu Thu AungYANGON, July 24 (Reuters) - A Reuters reporter on trial in Myanmar had his head covered with a black hood, was deprived of sleep and forced to kneel for hours at a secret police interrogation site after he was arrested with a colleague last year, he told a court on Tuesday.Kyaw Soe Oo, one of two Reuters journalists accused of obtaining state secrets, said the interrogators focused on a story the reporters had been working on about the murder by soldiers of 10 Rohingya Muslims, showing no interest in the documents they are accused of obtaining.During two weeks of questioning by officers from military intelligence and police special branch, the reporters were denied access to their families and lawyers, Kyaw Soe Oo told Judge Ye Lwin, overseeing proceedings at the court in Yangon.The 28-year-old burma news reporter and his colleague Wa Lone, 32, face charges brought under the colonial-era Official Secrets Act, in a case seen as a test of press freedom in myanmar news. Both have pleaded not guilty. If convicted, they could be sentenced to up to 14 years in prison.The reporters say the documents were planted on them by a police officer during a meeting at a restaurant on the outskirts of Yangon on Dec. 12. Defence lawyers have said the evidence put forward by the prosecution shows the police entrapped the journalists to interfere with their reporting.In his testimony, Kyaw Soe Oo said they were arrested immediately after leaving the restaurant and taken to a nearby police station, before being driven to a special police interrogation site in northern Yangon called Aung Tha Pyay."They put black hoods on us outside the Htaunt Kyant police station and we stayed hooded until we arrived at Aung Tha Pyay," said Kyaw Soe Oo."There were around 10 interrogation officers who took turns interrogating me. They didn't let us rest and asked questions for three days straight while I was in handcuffs."Speaking to reporters after the hearing, defence lawyer Than Zaw Aung likened such treatment to how Myanmar's former military rulers used to interrogate political opponents."Asking questions repeatedly for three days without letting them sleep made them mentally weak. This kind of mental and physical torture is a human rights' violation," said Than Zaw Aung.Myanmar government spokesman Zaw Htay said the government has "asked the police force whether they have illegal torture or not - the police said they guaranteed that they don't do any illegal torture".Zaw Htay also said Myanmar's courts were independent and the case would be conducted according to the law.Prosecutor Kyaw Min Aung declined to comment at the end of the day's proceedings. Police spokesman Colonel Myo Thu Soe did not answer calls seeking comment.Captain Myint Lwin, the officer in charge of the Htaunt Kyant police station, denied that the reporters were deprived of sleep or made to kneel when he testified to the court in June, saying officers were not allowed to "do such a thing".Kyaw Soe Oo testified throughout the day, before Judge Ye Lwin adjourned the proceedings. The trial will resume on Monday.ORDERED TO KNEELAt the time of their arrest, Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo had been working on an investigation into the killing of 10 Rohingya Muslim men and boys in the village of Inn Din in western Myanmar's Rakhine State.The killings took place during a military crackdown that United Nations officials have said constituted ethnic cleansing. More than 700,000 Rohingya fled to neighbouring Bangladesh since August last year, according to UN agencies. Myanmar rejects almost all accusations of wrongdoing and says its armed forces launched a legitimate counter-insurgency operation after coming under attack by Rohingya militants.Kyaw Soe Oo, who comes from the violence-torn Rakhine region and is a member of the Rakhine ethnic group, said the non-stop questioning ceased only after the police found photographs of the 10 men from Inn Din on the journalists' phones.Then, one of the interrogators burst into Kyaw Soe Oo's cell and asked angrily: "Why haven't you told us about this?" referring to the picture of the 10 kneeling men tied together, taken shortly before they were killed last September.At one point, a military intelligence officer brought print-outs of the Inn Din photographs and asked Kyaw Soe Oo whether he had "sent the photos from my phone to human rights organisations from foreign countries".Kyaw Soe Oo denied sending the photographs to anyone and told the officer: "I'm a reporter and I follow journalistic ethics." (Editing by Alex Richardson)Advertisement
    143 Posted by Eldon Board
  • By Shoon Naing and Thu Thu AungYANGON, July 24 (Reuters) - A Reuters reporter on trial in Myanmar had his head covered with a black hood, was deprived of sleep and forced to kneel for hours at a secret police interrogation site after he was arrested with a colleague last year, he told a court on Tuesday.Kyaw Soe Oo, one of two Reuters journalists accused of obtaining state secrets, said the interrogators focused on a story the reporters had been working on about the murder by soldiers of 10 Rohingya Muslims, showing no interest in the documents they are accused of obtaining.During two weeks of questioning by officers from military intelligence and police special branch, the reporters were denied access to their families and lawyers, Kyaw Soe Oo told Judge Ye Lwin, overseeing proceedings at the court in Yangon.The 28-year-old burma news reporter and his colleague Wa Lone, 32, face charges brought under the colonial-era Official Secrets Act, in a case seen as a test of press freedom in myanmar news. Both have pleaded not guilty. If convicted, they could be sentenced to up to 14 years in prison.The reporters say the documents were planted on them by a police officer during a meeting at a restaurant on the outskirts of Yangon on Dec. 12. Defence lawyers have said the evidence put forward by the prosecution shows the police entrapped the journalists to interfere with their reporting.In his testimony, Kyaw Soe Oo said they were arrested immediately after leaving the restaurant and taken to a nearby police station, before being driven to a special police interrogation site in northern Yangon called Aung Tha Pyay."They put black hoods on us outside the Htaunt Kyant police station and we stayed hooded until we arrived at Aung Tha Pyay," said Kyaw Soe Oo."There were around 10 interrogation officers who took turns interrogating me. They didn't let us rest and asked questions for three days straight while I was in handcuffs."Speaking to reporters after the hearing, defence lawyer Than Zaw Aung likened such treatment to how Myanmar's former military rulers used to interrogate political opponents."Asking questions repeatedly for three days without letting them sleep made them mentally weak. This kind of mental and physical torture is a human rights' violation," said Than Zaw Aung.Myanmar government spokesman Zaw Htay said the government has "asked the police force whether they have illegal torture or not - the police said they guaranteed that they don't do any illegal torture".Zaw Htay also said Myanmar's courts were independent and the case would be conducted according to the law.Prosecutor Kyaw Min Aung declined to comment at the end of the day's proceedings. Police spokesman Colonel Myo Thu Soe did not answer calls seeking comment.Captain Myint Lwin, the officer in charge of the Htaunt Kyant police station, denied that the reporters were deprived of sleep or made to kneel when he testified to the court in June, saying officers were not allowed to "do such a thing".Kyaw Soe Oo testified throughout the day, before Judge Ye Lwin adjourned the proceedings. The trial will resume on Monday.ORDERED TO KNEELAt the time of their arrest, Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo had been working on an investigation into the killing of 10 Rohingya Muslim men and boys in the village of Inn Din in western Myanmar's Rakhine State.The killings took place during a military crackdown that United Nations officials have said constituted ethnic cleansing. More than 700,000 Rohingya fled to neighbouring Bangladesh since August last year, according to UN agencies. Myanmar rejects almost all accusations of wrongdoing and says its armed forces launched a legitimate counter-insurgency operation after coming under attack by Rohingya militants.Kyaw Soe Oo, who comes from the violence-torn Rakhine region and is a member of the Rakhine ethnic group, said the non-stop questioning ceased only after the police found photographs of the 10 men from Inn Din on the journalists' phones.Then, one of the interrogators burst into Kyaw Soe Oo's cell and asked angrily: "Why haven't you told us about this?" referring to the picture of the 10 kneeling men tied together, taken shortly before they were killed last September.At one point, a military intelligence officer brought print-outs of the Inn Din photographs and asked Kyaw Soe Oo whether he had "sent the photos from my phone to human rights organisations from foreign countries".Kyaw Soe Oo denied sending the photographs to anyone and told the officer: "I'm a reporter and I follow journalistic ethics." (Editing by Alex Richardson)Advertisement
    Aug 16, 2018 143
  • 15 Aug 2018
    TOKYO burma news (AP) - A Japanese medical university's alleged systematic discrimination against female applicants has sparked outrage across Japan and is being criticized by Cabinet officials.The scandal surfaced after the Yomiuri newspaper reported Thursday that Tokyo Medical University has been slashing female applicants' entrance exam scores for years to keep female student population low because women tend to quit as doctors after starting families.Gender Equality Minister Seiko Noda says the allegation is extremely serious and unacceptable. Labor Minister Katsunobu Kato says an environment more supportive of women pursuing medical profession is needed.In this Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, photo, a woman walks past the game of Tokyo Medical University in Tokyo. The Japanese medical university's alleged systematic deduction of entrance exam scores only from female applicants has sparked outrage across Japan and invited criticisms from Cabinet officials. The scandal surfaced after the Yomiuri newspaper reported Thursday that Tokyo Medical University has been slashing female applicants' entrance exam scores for years to keep female student population low, on grounds they tend to quit as doctors after starting families, causing staffing shortages. The Japan plate reads: "Tokyo Medical University." (Ayaka Aizawa/Kyodo burma news via AP)The school is investigating. It is already facing a separate scandal involving an inappropriate admission of a top education bureaucrat's son.In this Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, photo, Tokyo Medical University stands in Tokyo. The Japanese medical university's alleged systematic deduction of entrance exam scores only from female applicants has sparked outrage across Japan and invited criticisms from Cabinet officials. The scandal surfaced after the Yomiuri newspaper reported Thursday that Tokyo Medical University has been slashing female applicants' entrance exam scores for years to keep female student population low, on grounds they tend to quit as doctors after starting families, causing staffing shortages. (Ayaka Aizawa/Kyodo burma news via AP)Advertisement
    126 Posted by Eldon Board
  • TOKYO burma news (AP) - A Japanese medical university's alleged systematic discrimination against female applicants has sparked outrage across Japan and is being criticized by Cabinet officials.The scandal surfaced after the Yomiuri newspaper reported Thursday that Tokyo Medical University has been slashing female applicants' entrance exam scores for years to keep female student population low because women tend to quit as doctors after starting families.Gender Equality Minister Seiko Noda says the allegation is extremely serious and unacceptable. Labor Minister Katsunobu Kato says an environment more supportive of women pursuing medical profession is needed.In this Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, photo, a woman walks past the game of Tokyo Medical University in Tokyo. The Japanese medical university's alleged systematic deduction of entrance exam scores only from female applicants has sparked outrage across Japan and invited criticisms from Cabinet officials. The scandal surfaced after the Yomiuri newspaper reported Thursday that Tokyo Medical University has been slashing female applicants' entrance exam scores for years to keep female student population low, on grounds they tend to quit as doctors after starting families, causing staffing shortages. The Japan plate reads: "Tokyo Medical University." (Ayaka Aizawa/Kyodo burma news via AP)The school is investigating. It is already facing a separate scandal involving an inappropriate admission of a top education bureaucrat's son.In this Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, photo, Tokyo Medical University stands in Tokyo. The Japanese medical university's alleged systematic deduction of entrance exam scores only from female applicants has sparked outrage across Japan and invited criticisms from Cabinet officials. The scandal surfaced after the Yomiuri newspaper reported Thursday that Tokyo Medical University has been slashing female applicants' entrance exam scores for years to keep female student population low, on grounds they tend to quit as doctors after starting families, causing staffing shortages. (Ayaka Aizawa/Kyodo burma news via AP)Advertisement
    Aug 15, 2018 126
  • 15 Aug 2018
    TOKYO, Aug 3 (Reuters) - Japan is considering creating a sovereign wealth fund to invest in U.S. infrastructure projects and U.S.-Japan joint projects in third countries and will float the idea at two-way trade talks in Washington next week, the Nikkei daily reported on Friday.Tokyo is seeking ways to counter U.S. pressure for a bilateral free trade agreement (FTA) and head off a rise in tariffs on its auto exports when Economy Minister Toshimitsu Motegi meets U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer in Washington on Aug. 9.Motegi told a burma news conference on Friday that he wanted to "take some ideas" to the talks, adding Japan would not make concessions that would hurt its national interests.Finance Minister Taro Aso said separately that Japan was in various talks with the United States on infrastructure, but had no specific plan to set up a sovereign wealth fund."Japan and the United States are holding various discussions in this area, but at the moment there?s no concrete consideration towards establishing a fund," Aso told reporters at a regular myanmar news briefing.The Nikkei said that Japan would raise capital from the private sector through bond issues as early as the business year beginning April 2019 and provide low-cost government and possibly public-private loans, taking advantage burma news of the Bank of Japan's hyper-easy monetary policy.It added that the size of the fund has yet to be determined.The proposal for the fund also urges converting money raised into foreign currency if the yen strengthens beyond around 100 yen to the dollar, a move that might open Japan to criticism of currency manipulation to keep the yen weak, Nikkei added.A ruling party source with knowledge of U.S.-Japan ties said a sovereign wealth fund for infrastructure has been under consideration since April and would likely come up when Motegi meets Lighthizer. But a Japanese government source said such a plan was not being deliberated and was unlikely to be feasible. Both spoke on condition of anonymity.Japanese Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Yasutoshi Nishimura told Reuters on Wednesday that Japanese firms were keen to invest in the robust U.S. market and that the government wants to "firmly support and back that". He did not elaborate.Toyota Motor Corp senior managing officer Masayoshi Shirayanagi told reporters the carmaker had no room to increase local production capacity in response to threatened tariffs. Toyota has already committed in 2017 to spend $10 billion in its U.S. manufacturing operations over the next five years.The reported sovereign wealth fund proposal comes after U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo this week announced a $113 million initiative in technology, energy and infrastructure in Asia and a trilateral push by the United States, Australia and Japan to invest in regional infrastructure projects.It echoes an idea floated last year to buy dollar-denominated "infrastructure bonds" as a way to take part in U.S. President Donald Trump's upgrade of U.S. infrastructure.Sumitomo Corp Chief Financial Officer Koichi Takahata told reporters the trading house was interested in social infrastructure as a growth sector and would consider it if there were a stable supply of funds and a way to hedge against country risk, a concern in some third countries.Trump wants a two-way trade pact as a way to cut America?s trade deficit with Japan but Tokyo is wary because an FTA would boost pressure to open sensitive markets such as agriculture.Nishimura and other Japanese officials have said Japan is expected to increase its imports of liquefied natural gas from America and buy U.S. military gear needed for its defence, both of which would help reduce the trade imbalance.But he ruled out setting a numerical limit on Japanese auto exports to the United States, a tactic taken during trade wars in the 1980s and early 1990s, before the 1995 launch of the World Trade Organization, which generally bans such steps.(Writing by Linda Sieg; Reporting by Linda Sieg, Tetsushi Kajimoto, Takaya Yamaguchi, Kaori Kaneko, Naomi Tajitsu and Maki Shiraki; Editing by Sam Holmes)Advertisement
    118 Posted by Eldon Board
  • TOKYO, Aug 3 (Reuters) - Japan is considering creating a sovereign wealth fund to invest in U.S. infrastructure projects and U.S.-Japan joint projects in third countries and will float the idea at two-way trade talks in Washington next week, the Nikkei daily reported on Friday.Tokyo is seeking ways to counter U.S. pressure for a bilateral free trade agreement (FTA) and head off a rise in tariffs on its auto exports when Economy Minister Toshimitsu Motegi meets U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer in Washington on Aug. 9.Motegi told a burma news conference on Friday that he wanted to "take some ideas" to the talks, adding Japan would not make concessions that would hurt its national interests.Finance Minister Taro Aso said separately that Japan was in various talks with the United States on infrastructure, but had no specific plan to set up a sovereign wealth fund."Japan and the United States are holding various discussions in this area, but at the moment there?s no concrete consideration towards establishing a fund," Aso told reporters at a regular myanmar news briefing.The Nikkei said that Japan would raise capital from the private sector through bond issues as early as the business year beginning April 2019 and provide low-cost government and possibly public-private loans, taking advantage burma news of the Bank of Japan's hyper-easy monetary policy.It added that the size of the fund has yet to be determined.The proposal for the fund also urges converting money raised into foreign currency if the yen strengthens beyond around 100 yen to the dollar, a move that might open Japan to criticism of currency manipulation to keep the yen weak, Nikkei added.A ruling party source with knowledge of U.S.-Japan ties said a sovereign wealth fund for infrastructure has been under consideration since April and would likely come up when Motegi meets Lighthizer. But a Japanese government source said such a plan was not being deliberated and was unlikely to be feasible. Both spoke on condition of anonymity.Japanese Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Yasutoshi Nishimura told Reuters on Wednesday that Japanese firms were keen to invest in the robust U.S. market and that the government wants to "firmly support and back that". He did not elaborate.Toyota Motor Corp senior managing officer Masayoshi Shirayanagi told reporters the carmaker had no room to increase local production capacity in response to threatened tariffs. Toyota has already committed in 2017 to spend $10 billion in its U.S. manufacturing operations over the next five years.The reported sovereign wealth fund proposal comes after U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo this week announced a $113 million initiative in technology, energy and infrastructure in Asia and a trilateral push by the United States, Australia and Japan to invest in regional infrastructure projects.It echoes an idea floated last year to buy dollar-denominated "infrastructure bonds" as a way to take part in U.S. President Donald Trump's upgrade of U.S. infrastructure.Sumitomo Corp Chief Financial Officer Koichi Takahata told reporters the trading house was interested in social infrastructure as a growth sector and would consider it if there were a stable supply of funds and a way to hedge against country risk, a concern in some third countries.Trump wants a two-way trade pact as a way to cut America?s trade deficit with Japan but Tokyo is wary because an FTA would boost pressure to open sensitive markets such as agriculture.Nishimura and other Japanese officials have said Japan is expected to increase its imports of liquefied natural gas from America and buy U.S. military gear needed for its defence, both of which would help reduce the trade imbalance.But he ruled out setting a numerical limit on Japanese auto exports to the United States, a tactic taken during trade wars in the 1980s and early 1990s, before the 1995 launch of the World Trade Organization, which generally bans such steps.(Writing by Linda Sieg; Reporting by Linda Sieg, Tetsushi Kajimoto, Takaya Yamaguchi, Kaori Kaneko, Naomi Tajitsu and Maki Shiraki; Editing by Sam Holmes)Advertisement
    Aug 15, 2018 118
  • 13 Aug 2018
    WASHINGTON, May 23 (Reuters) - Members of the U.S. House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly on Tuesday in favor of legislation to pressure Myanmar, also known as burma news, to improve its record on human rights.Lawmakers voted 382-30 to approve the measure as an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act, or NDAA, a massive defense policy bill that is one of the few pieces of legislation passed by the U.S. Congress every year.Nearly 700,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled into Bangladesh from Myanmar since August to escape a military crackdown, launched in response to Rohingya insurgent attacks. Refugees have reported murder, rape and arson by Myanmar troops.Washington has called the army response "ethnic cleansing," which Myanmar has denied, saying its security forces were conducting a legitimate counter-insurgency operation against "Bengali terrorists."If included in a final version of burma news the NDAA, typically passed by the House and Senate later in the year, the measure would, among other things, bar U.S. security assistance or cooperation with Myanmar's military or security forces until they have made progress on human rights.It also would impose sanctions on current or former senior Myanmar military officials who perpetrated or were responsible for serious human rights abuses.The amendment was introduced by Representative Eliot Engel, the top Democrat on the House Foreign Affairs Committee.Earlier this month the United Nations Security Council urged Myanmar?s government to carry out transparent investigations into accusations of violence against the Rohingya Muslims and allow immediate aid access to the region. (Reporting by Patricia Zengerle)Advertisement
    131 Posted by Eldon Board
  • WASHINGTON, May 23 (Reuters) - Members of the U.S. House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly on Tuesday in favor of legislation to pressure Myanmar, also known as burma news, to improve its record on human rights.Lawmakers voted 382-30 to approve the measure as an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act, or NDAA, a massive defense policy bill that is one of the few pieces of legislation passed by the U.S. Congress every year.Nearly 700,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled into Bangladesh from Myanmar since August to escape a military crackdown, launched in response to Rohingya insurgent attacks. Refugees have reported murder, rape and arson by Myanmar troops.Washington has called the army response "ethnic cleansing," which Myanmar has denied, saying its security forces were conducting a legitimate counter-insurgency operation against "Bengali terrorists."If included in a final version of burma news the NDAA, typically passed by the House and Senate later in the year, the measure would, among other things, bar U.S. security assistance or cooperation with Myanmar's military or security forces until they have made progress on human rights.It also would impose sanctions on current or former senior Myanmar military officials who perpetrated or were responsible for serious human rights abuses.The amendment was introduced by Representative Eliot Engel, the top Democrat on the House Foreign Affairs Committee.Earlier this month the United Nations Security Council urged Myanmar?s government to carry out transparent investigations into accusations of violence against the Rohingya Muslims and allow immediate aid access to the region. (Reporting by Patricia Zengerle)Advertisement
    Aug 13, 2018 131

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  • 21 Aug 2018
    Specialist maternity nurses have been deployed to Bangladesh to help pregnant Rohingya rape victims.Almost 700,000 Rohingya refugees have fled neighbouring burma news since last August amid reports of extreme violence, forming a total of more than 900,000 displaced people in the numerous sprawling camps.The Government estimates that around 16,000 women in camps in Bangladesh are currently expecting or have given birth.A Rohingya refugee camp, where many woman are pregnant after being raped (Jemma Crew/PA)SNP MP Carol Monaghan, speaking in the Commons, called on the Government to step in and offer support.She said: ?Last August myanmar news soldiers systematically brutalised and raped young Rohingya women, nine months on and in the middle of the monsoon season many of these young girls are now giving birth to the babies conceived as a result of the rape.?As these girls are often shunned by their communities what support is the UK Government providing to these vulnerable girls and their babies??Foreign Office Minister Alistair Burt responded: ?We?ve deployed specialist maternity workers to be there, in addition we are working with our partners to support Rohingya women who were raped and are pregnant.?The deployment includes training of medical specialists, psychosocial support, clinical management of rape, emergency obstetric care and this has all been provided despite the difficulties of monsoon and other circumstances.?Mr Burt, speaking during international development questions, also assured MPs that ?as much as possible was being done? to vaccinate Rohingya refugees against chorea, measles and diphtheria, which are ?the most common diseases in the camps?.He added: ?It is very much on people?s minds at such a vulnerable time.?Advertisement
    263 Posted by Eldon Board
  • 16 Aug 2018
    By Sam Aung MoonYANGON, July 26 (Reuters) - Authorities in northern myanmar news recovered eight bodies on Thursday after a landslide that engulfed 27 small-scale miners, an official said, the latest disaster to hit a centre of the Southeast Asian nation's lucrative jade trade.A search was continuing for others trapped or washed away when muddy earth slid from a cliff on Monday, but authorities were not expecting to find any of the miners alive, said fire brigade official Aye Thein, who was leading the search in the jade mining region of Hpakant in Kachin state.Aye Thein said the bodies of eight people had been recovered from water near the site of Monday's landslide, while others would need to be dug out of the rubble with excavators brought to the site on Tuesday.The recovered bodies are "badly deformed. They are already rotten," he said. "Others are still buried under the soil."Kyaw Swar Aung, administrator of Hpakant, said six of the bodies had already been collected by family members.Officials said the miners had come from nearby villages to pick through tailings for jade at a defunct mine, despite safety warnings.Deadly landslides are frequent in Hpakant during Myanmar?s rainy season from May to October. They frequently bury informal scavengers, or handpickers, who scour large piles of earth for jade.Another large landslide on July 14 killed at least 15 people and injured 45.myanmar news's jade industry is notoriously opaque, but advocacy group Global Witness estimated the trade was worth $31 billion in 2014. Experts say most of the stones are smuggled to neighbouring China. (Reporting by Sam Aung Moon; Editing by Simon Lewis and Richard Borsuk)Advertisement
    154 Posted by Eldon Board
  • 20 Aug 2018
    India is a country with a huge population so there are always things happening around the nations which on gets to know about with help of news. Indian politics, sports, natural disaster, entertainment, and many other events are the main focus of news in India. Many magazines give away information about the entity of system of Politics which develops curiosity among people. Many newspapers have their front page bearing latest political news. The international and national news always has some element of political myanmar news in it. But every nation has a different political background and history. Hence, the political issue shows variations depending on the various pieces of land. The Political news India is just a medium of delivering the political views of various people in the country.burma news gives away information about society, state, country, sports and even entertainment. The news about financial matter like budget, policy and bills etc. are also delivered by the India news. When the budget is announced the news channels makes an effort to spread the message about the governments act towards society and make the society well aware about it. The political news also makes people aware of the economic growth of various other countries and also their position in the market. The latest political news India sometimes is of very interest and so make up to the headlines of the world news. Whenever a foreign delegate comes to India in order to improve their relations with the country the news is covered by the agencies and it is conveyed to the general public. People always feel the need to be updated with the daily happenings around them. The latest political news helps them to know about the political activities going around the world.The political activities that go around in our country always make it to the world news. Many People prefer to know about the world's political news instead just being aware of the political happenings in the country. This political myanmar news India creates an image of the country in the minds of other people. It may be positive it negative depending upon the political news that is telecasted. Developing a positive image is very important as that decides the reputation of the country. There are many ad campaigns conducted for the citizens of India in which they are taught manners to build a positive image of country. In many countries political moments of country are telecasted which includes various moments of Loksabha's question hour.
    152 Posted by Eldon Board
  • 16 Aug 2018
    By Shoon Naing and Thu Thu AungYANGON, July 24 (Reuters) - A Reuters reporter on trial in Myanmar had his head covered with a black hood, was deprived of sleep and forced to kneel for hours at a secret police interrogation site after he was arrested with a colleague last year, he told a court on Tuesday.Kyaw Soe Oo, one of two Reuters journalists accused of obtaining state secrets, said the interrogators focused on a story the reporters had been working on about the murder by soldiers of 10 Rohingya Muslims, showing no interest in the documents they are accused of obtaining.During two weeks of questioning by officers from military intelligence and police special branch, the reporters were denied access to their families and lawyers, Kyaw Soe Oo told Judge Ye Lwin, overseeing proceedings at the court in Yangon.The 28-year-old burma news reporter and his colleague Wa Lone, 32, face charges brought under the colonial-era Official Secrets Act, in a case seen as a test of press freedom in myanmar news. Both have pleaded not guilty. If convicted, they could be sentenced to up to 14 years in prison.The reporters say the documents were planted on them by a police officer during a meeting at a restaurant on the outskirts of Yangon on Dec. 12. Defence lawyers have said the evidence put forward by the prosecution shows the police entrapped the journalists to interfere with their reporting.In his testimony, Kyaw Soe Oo said they were arrested immediately after leaving the restaurant and taken to a nearby police station, before being driven to a special police interrogation site in northern Yangon called Aung Tha Pyay."They put black hoods on us outside the Htaunt Kyant police station and we stayed hooded until we arrived at Aung Tha Pyay," said Kyaw Soe Oo."There were around 10 interrogation officers who took turns interrogating me. They didn't let us rest and asked questions for three days straight while I was in handcuffs."Speaking to reporters after the hearing, defence lawyer Than Zaw Aung likened such treatment to how Myanmar's former military rulers used to interrogate political opponents."Asking questions repeatedly for three days without letting them sleep made them mentally weak. This kind of mental and physical torture is a human rights' violation," said Than Zaw Aung.Myanmar government spokesman Zaw Htay said the government has "asked the police force whether they have illegal torture or not - the police said they guaranteed that they don't do any illegal torture".Zaw Htay also said Myanmar's courts were independent and the case would be conducted according to the law.Prosecutor Kyaw Min Aung declined to comment at the end of the day's proceedings. Police spokesman Colonel Myo Thu Soe did not answer calls seeking comment.Captain Myint Lwin, the officer in charge of the Htaunt Kyant police station, denied that the reporters were deprived of sleep or made to kneel when he testified to the court in June, saying officers were not allowed to "do such a thing".Kyaw Soe Oo testified throughout the day, before Judge Ye Lwin adjourned the proceedings. The trial will resume on Monday.ORDERED TO KNEELAt the time of their arrest, Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo had been working on an investigation into the killing of 10 Rohingya Muslim men and boys in the village of Inn Din in western Myanmar's Rakhine State.The killings took place during a military crackdown that United Nations officials have said constituted ethnic cleansing. More than 700,000 Rohingya fled to neighbouring Bangladesh since August last year, according to UN agencies. Myanmar rejects almost all accusations of wrongdoing and says its armed forces launched a legitimate counter-insurgency operation after coming under attack by Rohingya militants.Kyaw Soe Oo, who comes from the violence-torn Rakhine region and is a member of the Rakhine ethnic group, said the non-stop questioning ceased only after the police found photographs of the 10 men from Inn Din on the journalists' phones.Then, one of the interrogators burst into Kyaw Soe Oo's cell and asked angrily: "Why haven't you told us about this?" referring to the picture of the 10 kneeling men tied together, taken shortly before they were killed last September.At one point, a military intelligence officer brought print-outs of the Inn Din photographs and asked Kyaw Soe Oo whether he had "sent the photos from my phone to human rights organisations from foreign countries".Kyaw Soe Oo denied sending the photographs to anyone and told the officer: "I'm a reporter and I follow journalistic ethics." (Editing by Alex Richardson)Advertisement
    143 Posted by Eldon Board

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