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Shopping 459 views Sep 02, 2014
Students' 'green' fashions to be recognized at international ex

In the world of fashion, earning recognition at the international level is no small feat — especially when dresses made of bottle caps and trash bags are competing against professionally-designed garments.

Recycled materials took center stage at the annual fashion show put on by Liberty University’s Department of Family & Consumer Sciences (FACS) last April. Now, four of the top designs from that show have been selected to be shown at the International Textile & Apparel Association’s (ITAA) 2014 Annual Conference this November in Charlotte, North Carolina.

When fashion merchandising & interiors students Melissa Breaux, Brianne Crist, Amy Yoon, and Tenzi Chacha took to the runway in bottle caps, puzzle pieces, and trash bags during April’s “Go Green, Go Glam!” show, they assumed that the main event was over. But after their faculty mentor, Matalie Howard, submitted a list of the top six designs to ITAA, the students found themselves headed for recognition on an international stage.

Liberty FACS students model their designs during the annual fashion show.

http://www.kissydress.co.uk/pink-prom-dresses

Design professionals and students from universities across the world (including Cornell, Kent State, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Hong Kong Polytechnic) could only submit six designs in the areas of fiber arts, interior products, or clothing, yet after the ITAA’s double-blind jury evaluated hundreds of entries, four of the 29 chosen designs were Liberty students’ “green” garments.

“It’s a way for these students to break into the fashion industry,” Howard said, noting that name recognition is key in clothing design. “(ITAA’s recognition) is a very elite selection. I consider them winners.”

ITAA, with over 780 active members, is a professional organization composed of scholars, educators, and students in the textiles, apparel, and merchandising disciplines in higher education.

The students’ clothing designs, though made with “up-cycled” materials such as soda can tabs and duct tape, passed ITAA’s high industry standards when judged against non-recycled garments. The young designers were required to explain what contributions their creations made to the scholarly textile and clothing field, and their garments were judged on aesthetics, purpose, technique, execution, and innovation.

For Howard, it’s the work ethic of Breaux, Crist, Yoon, and Chacha — who received no college credit for the extracurricular fashion show — that is truly impressive.

“I am so proud of them and their hard work,” Howard said. “The quality of the FACS program is in the fact that our students are purposeful in their design work. They know that the industry is tough and that it is hard to get into. It’s a ‘pay-your-dues’ kind of industry. And they are willing to go not just the extra mile but miles beyond.

“It thrills me and humbles me to know that work which I felt was top-notch on the runway at Liberty is now being recognized internationally.”

The final award recipients will be determined on-site by judges during ITAA’s November conference.


Tags: #fashion  #dress  #women 

Demi Mahmood 's Entries

45 blogs
  • 13 Feb 2015
    “When good Americans die, they go to Paris,” Oscar Wilde once wrote—and it’s true that when I arrive in the French city for a marathon week of runway shows each season, I sometimes feel like I’ve gone to fashion heaven. It’s not just the clothes. As Vogue Beauty Director, it is my job to spend ten straight days exploring its hidden-away salons and tracking down its best facialists, colorists, perfumers, holistic healers, and massage therapists. As such, I’ve developed a few standout favorites over the years. Just down the street from my hotel on the Rue St. Honoré, Colette’s jewel box–size Beauty Box apothecary is my first stop. Though it’s hardly a secret, there is always something there to surprise and delight—for reasons not the least of which include the following: It is loaded with stuff I can’t get in New York. This year, having thoroughly cased the joint online in advance of my arrival, I have my eye on Too Cool for School—a Korean makeup line that was most likely created for sixteen-year-old girls and which I plan on buying in bulk despite my non-sixteen-year-old status, from the bright lipsticks in little plaid boxes to the black mascara sketched with dinosaur drawings. I’ll also pick up Pluie’s oversized cast metal feather barrette, which promises to turn my pillow hair into an aesthetic statement. Before I leave, I always stop by the perfume section to visit Liaison de Parfum, a line of beautiful and original fragrances made by my dear friend Nana de Bary: She is a wonderful, funny, and kind person and wherever I find her scents around the globe, I always spray a little on. prom dresses 2015 During the afternoons in Paris, when I have the chance between shows, I do something that my New York self wouldn’t dream of: I work out in the middle of the day. Last spring, I discovered L’Usine, the extremely chic club de sport in the fourth arrondissement, where, for 50 euros, you can buy a day pass, book a private boxing session, or train with one of their excellent Pilates instructors. (Sidenote: The locker room blow-dryers are a revelation.) Not far away is another recent favorite discovery: holistic and fitness guru Moraima Gaetmank’s Studio Kinétique. A former dancer with a master’s degree in cognitive and behavioral psychology, Gaetmank possesses that rarest of qualities: a genuine healing touch. One hour-long session in her magical sunlit space, which includes a mix of Pilates, Gyrokinesis, and Gyrotonics, is the only thing that can undo four sleepless weeks of slouching at my laptop. In fact, Paris is a city filled with just such magical, word-of-mouth beauty sanctuaries—which, along with centuries of good Gallic genes, may explain why French women age so well. One such destination is hairstylist David Mallet’s hôtel particulier salon in the second arrondissement. There is no other word to describe David, who is actually Australian by birth and blessed with a supreme excess of charisma, but dashing. He most definitely belongs in a James Bond film. This, along with his directional eye, is why he’s on the speed dial of every major designer, model, and actress in Paris—and why it is harder to get an appointment with him during Fashion Week than the President. Fortunately, all of his senior stylists are amazingly well-trained. Book the hour-long head massage followed by a blowout. You will leave looking cool, French, and possibly un peu sexy—but never overly done. Good hair, of course, calls for good skin—and when I need to look fresh-faced, I head to The Spa My Blend at the Royal Monceau. I’ve never met a hammam I didn’t like, and as such, I could spend the whole day in their white-tiled sauna and Turkish-style plunge pool or swimming laps in the Philippe Starck–designed pool space. Eventually I will end up falling into a comatose sleep mid-facial on a heated treatment bed—a ritual I am likely to repeat at the spas at the Park Hyatt (the La Mer facial is truly divine), Darphin, or Biologique Recherche. The one area where I take exception to all this excessively French relaxation, of course, is my nails: I get bored during overly drawn-out appointments and am mostly focused on a good polish job. I book my sessions online at Manucurist—which is a great nail bar that I discovered on a tip from the wonderful French journalist Lili Barbery-Coulon. My other go-to spot is Prisca Courtin-Clarins’s Nail Factory, where this American in Paris is happy to report that you can get a perfect gel manicure and pedicure in a New York minute. vintage prom dresses 2014 You should also see: http://charlottea.tarlog.com/post/27/
    357 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • “When good Americans die, they go to Paris,” Oscar Wilde once wrote—and it’s true that when I arrive in the French city for a marathon week of runway shows each season, I sometimes feel like I’ve gone to fashion heaven. It’s not just the clothes. As Vogue Beauty Director, it is my job to spend ten straight days exploring its hidden-away salons and tracking down its best facialists, colorists, perfumers, holistic healers, and massage therapists. As such, I’ve developed a few standout favorites over the years. Just down the street from my hotel on the Rue St. Honoré, Colette’s jewel box–size Beauty Box apothecary is my first stop. Though it’s hardly a secret, there is always something there to surprise and delight—for reasons not the least of which include the following: It is loaded with stuff I can’t get in New York. This year, having thoroughly cased the joint online in advance of my arrival, I have my eye on Too Cool for School—a Korean makeup line that was most likely created for sixteen-year-old girls and which I plan on buying in bulk despite my non-sixteen-year-old status, from the bright lipsticks in little plaid boxes to the black mascara sketched with dinosaur drawings. I’ll also pick up Pluie’s oversized cast metal feather barrette, which promises to turn my pillow hair into an aesthetic statement. Before I leave, I always stop by the perfume section to visit Liaison de Parfum, a line of beautiful and original fragrances made by my dear friend Nana de Bary: She is a wonderful, funny, and kind person and wherever I find her scents around the globe, I always spray a little on. prom dresses 2015 During the afternoons in Paris, when I have the chance between shows, I do something that my New York self wouldn’t dream of: I work out in the middle of the day. Last spring, I discovered L’Usine, the extremely chic club de sport in the fourth arrondissement, where, for 50 euros, you can buy a day pass, book a private boxing session, or train with one of their excellent Pilates instructors. (Sidenote: The locker room blow-dryers are a revelation.) Not far away is another recent favorite discovery: holistic and fitness guru Moraima Gaetmank’s Studio Kinétique. A former dancer with a master’s degree in cognitive and behavioral psychology, Gaetmank possesses that rarest of qualities: a genuine healing touch. One hour-long session in her magical sunlit space, which includes a mix of Pilates, Gyrokinesis, and Gyrotonics, is the only thing that can undo four sleepless weeks of slouching at my laptop. In fact, Paris is a city filled with just such magical, word-of-mouth beauty sanctuaries—which, along with centuries of good Gallic genes, may explain why French women age so well. One such destination is hairstylist David Mallet’s hôtel particulier salon in the second arrondissement. There is no other word to describe David, who is actually Australian by birth and blessed with a supreme excess of charisma, but dashing. He most definitely belongs in a James Bond film. This, along with his directional eye, is why he’s on the speed dial of every major designer, model, and actress in Paris—and why it is harder to get an appointment with him during Fashion Week than the President. Fortunately, all of his senior stylists are amazingly well-trained. Book the hour-long head massage followed by a blowout. You will leave looking cool, French, and possibly un peu sexy—but never overly done. Good hair, of course, calls for good skin—and when I need to look fresh-faced, I head to The Spa My Blend at the Royal Monceau. I’ve never met a hammam I didn’t like, and as such, I could spend the whole day in their white-tiled sauna and Turkish-style plunge pool or swimming laps in the Philippe Starck–designed pool space. Eventually I will end up falling into a comatose sleep mid-facial on a heated treatment bed—a ritual I am likely to repeat at the spas at the Park Hyatt (the La Mer facial is truly divine), Darphin, or Biologique Recherche. The one area where I take exception to all this excessively French relaxation, of course, is my nails: I get bored during overly drawn-out appointments and am mostly focused on a good polish job. I book my sessions online at Manucurist—which is a great nail bar that I discovered on a tip from the wonderful French journalist Lili Barbery-Coulon. My other go-to spot is Prisca Courtin-Clarins’s Nail Factory, where this American in Paris is happy to report that you can get a perfect gel manicure and pedicure in a New York minute. vintage prom dresses 2014 You should also see: http://charlottea.tarlog.com/post/27/
    Feb 13, 2015 357
  • 11 Feb 2015
    Oh, woe is the improperly dressed man. “The consequences of a zipper malfunction,” explains a video about the coat I am wearing today, “can take you out of your zone instantly. That’s what Puma considered when choosing the right zipper for Arsène Wenger.” Arsène’s coat – that most famous coat in British football – is his closest companion, his oldest enemy. Often the Arsenal manager is pictured on the touchline, struggling with the zipper in the cold. The engineers at Puma have constructed him a special coat calibrated for his style of zipping, coming up with an oversized zip-pull, yet still he struggles. This is an important issue. Of course the modern football manager must think, carefully and tactically, about his wardrobe. Steve McClaren lost his England job after sheltering, cowardly, under an umbrella as England lost to Croatia in the rain. Tim Sherwood, infamously, wore a gilet for much of his short and ignominious stint as manager of Tottenham Hotspur. Roberto Martinez enjoys a gothic, buckled-up bondage coat, as if he were Edward Scissorhands. celebrity dresses But the most successful managers are always well-turned-out. Joachim Löw – who won the World Cup with Germany – is known for his dandy-ish style and his mad, megalomaniacal obsession that his assistant Hans Dieter Flick must always dress exactly like him, for instance in a lavender V-neck and navy blazer. Jose Mourinho favours dark grey, dashing overcoats that complement his salt-and-pepper hair. Diego Simeone dresses all in frightening black, like an assassin-with-a-heart-of-gold in the movie Léon. But I have been asked to wear Arsène Wenger’s coat out and about – even though I am a Tottenham fan and cannot stand him or his team – and why not, I suppose? The first test? A stroll down Old and New Bond Streets,to see what the wealthy fashion crowd might make of this. Actually, a lot of them are also dressed in long caterpillar coats, but mostly these are by Moncler and cost much, much more than Arsène’s. A lot of them are in furs, too. I try to catch the eye of a beautiful 20-something brunette in a smart winter overcoat (the sort of thing Mourinho wears) but she averts her eyes, appalled. My next stop is Vogue House, where I am working this week, and the doorman is happy to see me – it turns out he supports Arsenal. I sense his disillusionment when I tell him I’m only wearing the coat because the Guardian made me. Clearly, I feel embarrassed. And, more than that, I feel long. Very, very long. This is a coat so absurdly long that it inspired its own meme. It is difficult to move in a tightly zipped coat that comes down below the knees, and difficult to access any trouser pockets, too. Coming out of the underground, I bump into a matewho says “I like your coat”, and I gaze sadly into the middle distance and complain that it’s hard to walk. And then he explains the double zip to me. It turns out that this coat can also be unzipped from the bottom – Arsène never does this at the football, but then he can hardly do it up in the first place – transforming it in to a flowing trench coat, or even a gentlemanly cape. Still, it looks awful on me, and only works on Arsène because he’s exceedingly tall and skinny, like the Nightmare Before Christmas. Having said all that, I am toasty and comfortable – even when I pose beside the chiller cabinets in my local Tesco - if somewhat immobilised, in Arsène’s coat. It’s perfect for standing around in the cold, which is its purpose, and its quilting and fleece lining are very snug. Later this week I’ll be boarding a 26-hour-long cargo ferry from Immingham to Gothenburg, which will be very frosty, so I think I’ll wear it a little longer before donating it to charity or burning it. It’s a wonderful winter coat, I suppose– if you like Arsenal and can use a zipper. short purple prom dresses You should also see: http://themedesign1.ning.com/profiles/blogs/designer-carrie-hammer-talks-role-models-in-fashion
    409 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • Oh, woe is the improperly dressed man. “The consequences of a zipper malfunction,” explains a video about the coat I am wearing today, “can take you out of your zone instantly. That’s what Puma considered when choosing the right zipper for Arsène Wenger.” Arsène’s coat – that most famous coat in British football – is his closest companion, his oldest enemy. Often the Arsenal manager is pictured on the touchline, struggling with the zipper in the cold. The engineers at Puma have constructed him a special coat calibrated for his style of zipping, coming up with an oversized zip-pull, yet still he struggles. This is an important issue. Of course the modern football manager must think, carefully and tactically, about his wardrobe. Steve McClaren lost his England job after sheltering, cowardly, under an umbrella as England lost to Croatia in the rain. Tim Sherwood, infamously, wore a gilet for much of his short and ignominious stint as manager of Tottenham Hotspur. Roberto Martinez enjoys a gothic, buckled-up bondage coat, as if he were Edward Scissorhands. celebrity dresses But the most successful managers are always well-turned-out. Joachim Löw – who won the World Cup with Germany – is known for his dandy-ish style and his mad, megalomaniacal obsession that his assistant Hans Dieter Flick must always dress exactly like him, for instance in a lavender V-neck and navy blazer. Jose Mourinho favours dark grey, dashing overcoats that complement his salt-and-pepper hair. Diego Simeone dresses all in frightening black, like an assassin-with-a-heart-of-gold in the movie Léon. But I have been asked to wear Arsène Wenger’s coat out and about – even though I am a Tottenham fan and cannot stand him or his team – and why not, I suppose? The first test? A stroll down Old and New Bond Streets,to see what the wealthy fashion crowd might make of this. Actually, a lot of them are also dressed in long caterpillar coats, but mostly these are by Moncler and cost much, much more than Arsène’s. A lot of them are in furs, too. I try to catch the eye of a beautiful 20-something brunette in a smart winter overcoat (the sort of thing Mourinho wears) but she averts her eyes, appalled. My next stop is Vogue House, where I am working this week, and the doorman is happy to see me – it turns out he supports Arsenal. I sense his disillusionment when I tell him I’m only wearing the coat because the Guardian made me. Clearly, I feel embarrassed. And, more than that, I feel long. Very, very long. This is a coat so absurdly long that it inspired its own meme. It is difficult to move in a tightly zipped coat that comes down below the knees, and difficult to access any trouser pockets, too. Coming out of the underground, I bump into a matewho says “I like your coat”, and I gaze sadly into the middle distance and complain that it’s hard to walk. And then he explains the double zip to me. It turns out that this coat can also be unzipped from the bottom – Arsène never does this at the football, but then he can hardly do it up in the first place – transforming it in to a flowing trench coat, or even a gentlemanly cape. Still, it looks awful on me, and only works on Arsène because he’s exceedingly tall and skinny, like the Nightmare Before Christmas. Having said all that, I am toasty and comfortable – even when I pose beside the chiller cabinets in my local Tesco - if somewhat immobilised, in Arsène’s coat. It’s perfect for standing around in the cold, which is its purpose, and its quilting and fleece lining are very snug. Later this week I’ll be boarding a 26-hour-long cargo ferry from Immingham to Gothenburg, which will be very frosty, so I think I’ll wear it a little longer before donating it to charity or burning it. It’s a wonderful winter coat, I suppose– if you like Arsenal and can use a zipper. short purple prom dresses You should also see: http://themedesign1.ning.com/profiles/blogs/designer-carrie-hammer-talks-role-models-in-fashion
    Feb 11, 2015 409
  • 09 Feb 2015
    “It started very spontaneously,” explains Sofía Sanchez de Betak. “Alex just came up with it and said it was a cute idea, but it was in the middle of our wedding so we were completely overwhelmed with the day! We started as soon as we got back from the honeymoon.” The Argentinian art director, tastemaker, and devoted collector—of vintage Georg Jensen jewels, Argentinian “very gaucho silver,” Odraz Vesmir clutches, and more—was talking about the soon-to-launch (this Wednesday, to be exact) Paddle8 jewelry and watch auction that she and her very new husband Alexandre de Betak curated. The auction—a sale of rare artist- and designer-designed rings, necklaces, vintage watches and more—is the first of its kind for the online auctioneer house, which until now has focused exclusively on fine art. celebrity dresses It’s also a first for the creative couple, who delved through a host of wide-ranging, decades-spanning inspirations before settling on a selection of architect-, artist-, and designer-crafted pieces—with eighties Memphis as the primary guide. “That’s what we love the most and what we find the most interesting and fun in terms of sculptural jewelry,” says Sofía, who recently rediscovered the appeal of bold pieces—works like the 18k gold and turquoise seventies Claude Lalanne cat choker that she picked up at auction some time ago herself—after being robbed of all her fine jewelry last year. “The jewelry they left behind was all of my designer jewelry,” she continues. “So in a way, it feels much more exciting and safer and smart and more personal for me to buy interesting design pieces instead of crazy gold jewels.” The jewels and timepieces going on the block? There’s a winding copper spiral pendant by kinetic sculptor Alexander Calder; a delightfully surreal brooch of ruby and pearl lips designed by Salvador Dalí (inspired by the kiss of Mae West) in 1949; a kitschy postmodern Memphis-style brooch by Peter Shire; several rare, restored antique Rolexes; even two vintage Pulsar watches from Alex de Betak’s personal collection of some ten to 20 watches (“he wears only those and he’s very particular about his watch selection,” says his wife). These are items—there are around 40 being auctioned in total—with aged stories and (frequently) offbeat sensibility, often representing an extension within a period of the designer’s larger body of work. What’s different and exciting about the pieces they’ve chosen, explains Sofía, is that they’re not merely artworks translated into jewelry; they are sculptures in and of themselves—“a form of art that you can actually wear.” pink prom dresses
    585 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • “It started very spontaneously,” explains Sofía Sanchez de Betak. “Alex just came up with it and said it was a cute idea, but it was in the middle of our wedding so we were completely overwhelmed with the day! We started as soon as we got back from the honeymoon.” The Argentinian art director, tastemaker, and devoted collector—of vintage Georg Jensen jewels, Argentinian “very gaucho silver,” Odraz Vesmir clutches, and more—was talking about the soon-to-launch (this Wednesday, to be exact) Paddle8 jewelry and watch auction that she and her very new husband Alexandre de Betak curated. The auction—a sale of rare artist- and designer-designed rings, necklaces, vintage watches and more—is the first of its kind for the online auctioneer house, which until now has focused exclusively on fine art. celebrity dresses It’s also a first for the creative couple, who delved through a host of wide-ranging, decades-spanning inspirations before settling on a selection of architect-, artist-, and designer-crafted pieces—with eighties Memphis as the primary guide. “That’s what we love the most and what we find the most interesting and fun in terms of sculptural jewelry,” says Sofía, who recently rediscovered the appeal of bold pieces—works like the 18k gold and turquoise seventies Claude Lalanne cat choker that she picked up at auction some time ago herself—after being robbed of all her fine jewelry last year. “The jewelry they left behind was all of my designer jewelry,” she continues. “So in a way, it feels much more exciting and safer and smart and more personal for me to buy interesting design pieces instead of crazy gold jewels.” The jewels and timepieces going on the block? There’s a winding copper spiral pendant by kinetic sculptor Alexander Calder; a delightfully surreal brooch of ruby and pearl lips designed by Salvador Dalí (inspired by the kiss of Mae West) in 1949; a kitschy postmodern Memphis-style brooch by Peter Shire; several rare, restored antique Rolexes; even two vintage Pulsar watches from Alex de Betak’s personal collection of some ten to 20 watches (“he wears only those and he’s very particular about his watch selection,” says his wife). These are items—there are around 40 being auctioned in total—with aged stories and (frequently) offbeat sensibility, often representing an extension within a period of the designer’s larger body of work. What’s different and exciting about the pieces they’ve chosen, explains Sofía, is that they’re not merely artworks translated into jewelry; they are sculptures in and of themselves—“a form of art that you can actually wear.” pink prom dresses
    Feb 09, 2015 585
  • 06 Feb 2015
    Issue 6 of CR Fashion Book might not have happened. Carine Roitfeld had not one, not two, but three back surgeries between the last round of shows and the magazine’s arrival on newsstands in a few days. She styled some of the shoots in the new book from a wheelchair. “Tom Pecheux was pushing, so it was OK,” she said from her perch at the Shangri-La Hotel, laughing in her plastic corset. In case you saw Roitfeld at the couture shows and thought differently, the waist-spanning brace isn’t decorative; if she’s lucky, she’ll have it off by the Paris fashion shows in March when she plans to celebrate the new issue with a big party. “It doesn’t go with an evening dress,” she said. Roitfeld gave Style a sneak preview of several stories in the new issue, and opened up about everything from Paris post-Charlie Hebdo to the new guy at Gucci to which particular member of the Kardashian-Jenner clan made it into the magazine. Hint: It’s not Kendall. Carine Roitfeld: So, you see my corset... Nicole Phelps: Yes, I thought it was a fabulous belt from the distance at the Lanvin Pre-Fall presentation. At first it is not bad, it is a bit Alaïa, but at the back it is fully…it is custom by the hospital. It is from hospital. So you’ve recovered? I am much better. I had an accident one year ago in New York. I fell down and I broke some bones, and you know because I am always running, I do not always do what I need to do. And finally I had an operation, and after one operation I had a second operation, and after the second, I had a third operation. So it is a long process. And the back, there is a lot of healing...you say “heal”? prom dresses 2015 Yes, heal. When you have to stop for two months, you are even more excited to go back. So maybe it was a good thing. More energy, more happy to go to work, with new ideas. [Hopefully] this issue will be a bit of a reflection of what I had in my mind. Something you see a bit differently, I will say. How will it be different? After hospital, I was thinking, What’s my issue going to be about? Because it was very late. So I kept thinking. I like Serge Gainsbourg, the French singer, and he made a beautiful song about Anjelica Huston that I love, too, called “Jolie Laide.” I think American people know this song. It means “ugly beauty,” but I think jolie laide maybe is nicer. It’s true in life and mostly in this work of fashion that the idea of beauty has changed. The whole issue will be around this idea of jolie laide—not just about the beauty, but about fashion, about pictures, about something that is more interesting. I think it is a very good sign for women because we are not all perfect. I made a long story about Michael Avedon; I asked him to do my ugly beauties, in a way. I could not have Kate Moss, because I could not travel, so I could not have Kate Moss in this story, but she could be a part of it. She was not a perfect beauty, but finally she is one of the biggest top models, you know? It’s like Lara Stone. She is top model now, but you know when Riccardo [Tisci] introduced me to her, no one wanted her. She wasn’t graceful or…? She wasn’t enough skinny, [she had] too much breasts, you know. She was the fitting makeup girl for the show, nothing more. Can you imagine? And now she is one of the biggest top models. It’s like Gigi [Hadid]. She is a girl who I really pushed. She has a very special face. Some people think she isn’t beautiful, some people think she’s great, but she is not the profile of ideal beauty. Everything [in the issue] is around that, you know? And to make some more surprise, you know of course I am still very faithful to the Kardashians because I started with Kim. It was a good thing for her and it was a good thing for me—Iook at where she is now. So I still wanted someone from the Kardashian family in my magazine. It is not her, it is the younger sister, what’s her name? Kylie. I think she has a very interesting face. And Kanye will be a part of this issue, too. black prom dresses You were here when the Charlie Hebdo attack happened, correct? Do you see it having an effect on the designers who are based here? It was a shock for French people. America had the Boston Marathon bombings; you had, of course, the Twin Towers. But for the French, it was a big shock because we are not used to such horrible things in our lives. Still, I think French designers push a lot. Think of Jean Paul Gaultier, of what he did when he did the Jewish show. I don’t think it would be possible to do today, to do a show like that. In a way there is regression a bit in the freedom of people. Me, I always pay attention to not make other people unhappy; I am very free, but I don’t want to hurt anyone. Now there are a lot of other rules that magazines have to follow, there are the advertisers, so it is not totally freedom that you are living. For me what’s important is to feel free even when I respect all the people I am working with, all my advertisers, and I hope I can keep it this way, for a long time, this is my luxury. But I think for French magazines, they are not very far away from American or Japanese or English magazines now, no? What do you think, do you find a lot of difference? I think your era of Paris Vogue, it felt very different. Yes, I got a lot of letters. But you know, sometimes you never know what you are going to be attacked for. They attacked me for being racist because I painted Lara Stone in all the colors and in one photo she was painted in black. And I was the first one to put a girl like Liya Kebede from the cover to the entire issue, so people have a very short memory, you know. And one time I put a very oversized girl, because I have always liked oversized girls in a magazine, and I received a lot of letters, like, “Oh, why did you put this ugly girl in your magazine?” What have you thought of the couture shows so far? I think the Dior show was for me the best one of Raf’s so far. And I loved the shoes, the shoes were brilliant. It seems like he is gaining confidence. It really felt very strong. I am happy for him. I met Raf when he was very young, the long hair like a grungy boy when he started doing his collections, and we photographed with Mario Testino a lot at that time, it was a very long time ago. And I remember, I visited him and after I never met him again, and he is very shy, and I remember someone was calling him after a very long time, and I said, “Pass me the phone, I want to say congratulations.” And I said, “Raf, this is Carine, we met a very long time ago.” And he said, “I want to thank you for this shoot you did for me in Paris 15 years ago.” So he has a very good memory, he seems very nice, I would love to have a coffee with him once. So, looking forward to February and the shows, is there anything you have your eye on? No, honestly. It’s like everything, you are never looking for your boyfriend and suddenly you found your boyfriend. It’s the same for designers. You know Riccardo, his show, I went for the first time in Milan because my son, he was friends with Mariacarla [Boscono], and Mariacarla gave to my son the invitation of Riccardo, and for me he was no one. And I was like, “OK, I have a car and I have a bit of time,” and I was like, “OK, let’s go.” So I went to see that show and it was totally new, totally fresh, and it was very interesting. That’s the way I met Riccardo. Of course I am going to wait for J.W Anderson because it is exciting, of course I am going to wait for Christopher Kane because I have been following him from the beginning, but you never know what is going to be. I like to support new talent, I just regret not to support more before. It’s the next generation, we need them. It’s like Riccardo, he’s not so young anymore. I am so happy to see Hedi Slimane. I went to see his first show when he was working at YSL for men, and there was not more than 10 people in the room, and then they become like this, such a big success, so it makes you happy, you know, it makes you happy that you’ve known them for so many years. So yesterday I was backstage with Riccardo at Saint Laurent. I was between Riccardo and Hedi and it was a nice moment to be between two friends. Very talented friends. I say I am very gifted to have very talented friends. And they are friends together, too, they are old friends, as you may know. And what about Gucci, your old stomping grounds? I don’t know the guy [new creative director Alessandro Michele]. It was a bit like we took the assistant of the assistant. I didn’t see the men’s show, I do not know if you were in Milan. I only saw the pictures… What did you think? It was a bit different already… Yes, it was different. Maybe he is even looking at J.W. Anderson a little bit, that androgyny idea. Jonathan is a bit like the new one that everyone is looking at, he has the talent, he has a certain charisma. As for Gucci, I am more excited for the women’s show, I will say, than for the men’s show. I wonder what Tom Ford thought. I’m sure he still keeps an eye at what’s happening there. Of course. But you know, you cannot remake the game, you cannot remake the film. And sometimes I think if Tom Ford was going back to Gucci and he asked me to work with him, I would never say yes, because it’s done. But it was a very good moment. Everything was possible. Everything was free, and it was very fun to work with him. Who are the new photographers you’re working with? When you decide you want to work with the new photographers, do you feel it is a risk? Or do you really like… At the beginning, I had no choice. Other photographers, I was not allowed to work with then, but in a certain way it was a very good thing for me because it pushed me to find new ones. One is Michael Avedon—OK, he has a good name, but sometimes it can be even more difficult when you have a good name to be a photographer. He did the portfolio of “Jolie Laide,” and it is not easy to photograph a star and make her not as beautiful as people expect her to be. I think he did it in a very smart way; he is a very smart person. And there are a lot of amazing new girls in the issue. [We shot girls with] everything you think is not beautiful, you know, big ears. Big ears were always my complex because I have these ears coming out of my hair and now Karl [Lagerfeld, who did the shoot] loves this girl with the hair like that, so we say, “OK, good.” You know I think Karl is very risky, in casting and in advertising. Even when he is doing Chanel and Fendi, he will photograph other brands, which is rare. Right, he is not too proud? No, he is happy to photograph. He will say, “Oh, what’s that? Oh, I like it.” He is very professional, and I like that. There is a picture Karl did of me in my corset [in the issue]. One of my favorite stories in the issue is about destroyed jeans and T-shirts. Now if you want to buy destroyed jeans, it’s so much more expensive. Why? I think it’s very interesting how suddenly a destroyed T-shirt is more expensive than a new T-shirt. This is ugly beauty, too. So it is all linked in this issue. Kristen Stewart is part of the magazine. Is she? Yes, because I met her with Karl. And she is very special, too, she is not a perfect beauty. If she does not know you, sometimes she is very insecure. It is strange, but sometimes you are very beautiful and very insecure. Karl took a beautiful picture of her. She is very perfection in the photo. I made her look a bit like Patti Smith for the photo, and she was like, “I am just on the line with Patti Smith.” I said, “Oh, ask her what she thinks of the photo,” and she said that Patti liked it. I thought if Patti likes it, we can do it. I didn’t realize they were friends, because Patti Smith is always a big reference in fashion. Kristen is a funny girl, but you have to know her. She is quite shy at the beginning, you know. We all dream to be actresses—we all want to be Nicole Kidman and Angelina Jolie, but are they more happy than us? I’m not sure. It is difficult to be an actress, because when you are an actress, you can’t age. In fashion it is not easy, either, but usually I am not in front of the camera, I am behind, so it is easier for me. I think every beauty needs something weird—a little error or it’s not beautiful. You should also see: http://ourbdspace.com/blog/44013/beauty-with-a-thought-efva-attling/ https://www.bungie.net/en/Forum/Post/99057626
    355 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • Issue 6 of CR Fashion Book might not have happened. Carine Roitfeld had not one, not two, but three back surgeries between the last round of shows and the magazine’s arrival on newsstands in a few days. She styled some of the shoots in the new book from a wheelchair. “Tom Pecheux was pushing, so it was OK,” she said from her perch at the Shangri-La Hotel, laughing in her plastic corset. In case you saw Roitfeld at the couture shows and thought differently, the waist-spanning brace isn’t decorative; if she’s lucky, she’ll have it off by the Paris fashion shows in March when she plans to celebrate the new issue with a big party. “It doesn’t go with an evening dress,” she said. Roitfeld gave Style a sneak preview of several stories in the new issue, and opened up about everything from Paris post-Charlie Hebdo to the new guy at Gucci to which particular member of the Kardashian-Jenner clan made it into the magazine. Hint: It’s not Kendall. Carine Roitfeld: So, you see my corset... Nicole Phelps: Yes, I thought it was a fabulous belt from the distance at the Lanvin Pre-Fall presentation. At first it is not bad, it is a bit Alaïa, but at the back it is fully…it is custom by the hospital. It is from hospital. So you’ve recovered? I am much better. I had an accident one year ago in New York. I fell down and I broke some bones, and you know because I am always running, I do not always do what I need to do. And finally I had an operation, and after one operation I had a second operation, and after the second, I had a third operation. So it is a long process. And the back, there is a lot of healing...you say “heal”? prom dresses 2015 Yes, heal. When you have to stop for two months, you are even more excited to go back. So maybe it was a good thing. More energy, more happy to go to work, with new ideas. [Hopefully] this issue will be a bit of a reflection of what I had in my mind. Something you see a bit differently, I will say. How will it be different? After hospital, I was thinking, What’s my issue going to be about? Because it was very late. So I kept thinking. I like Serge Gainsbourg, the French singer, and he made a beautiful song about Anjelica Huston that I love, too, called “Jolie Laide.” I think American people know this song. It means “ugly beauty,” but I think jolie laide maybe is nicer. It’s true in life and mostly in this work of fashion that the idea of beauty has changed. The whole issue will be around this idea of jolie laide—not just about the beauty, but about fashion, about pictures, about something that is more interesting. I think it is a very good sign for women because we are not all perfect. I made a long story about Michael Avedon; I asked him to do my ugly beauties, in a way. I could not have Kate Moss, because I could not travel, so I could not have Kate Moss in this story, but she could be a part of it. She was not a perfect beauty, but finally she is one of the biggest top models, you know? It’s like Lara Stone. She is top model now, but you know when Riccardo [Tisci] introduced me to her, no one wanted her. She wasn’t graceful or…? She wasn’t enough skinny, [she had] too much breasts, you know. She was the fitting makeup girl for the show, nothing more. Can you imagine? And now she is one of the biggest top models. It’s like Gigi [Hadid]. She is a girl who I really pushed. She has a very special face. Some people think she isn’t beautiful, some people think she’s great, but she is not the profile of ideal beauty. Everything [in the issue] is around that, you know? And to make some more surprise, you know of course I am still very faithful to the Kardashians because I started with Kim. It was a good thing for her and it was a good thing for me—Iook at where she is now. So I still wanted someone from the Kardashian family in my magazine. It is not her, it is the younger sister, what’s her name? Kylie. I think she has a very interesting face. And Kanye will be a part of this issue, too. black prom dresses You were here when the Charlie Hebdo attack happened, correct? Do you see it having an effect on the designers who are based here? It was a shock for French people. America had the Boston Marathon bombings; you had, of course, the Twin Towers. But for the French, it was a big shock because we are not used to such horrible things in our lives. Still, I think French designers push a lot. Think of Jean Paul Gaultier, of what he did when he did the Jewish show. I don’t think it would be possible to do today, to do a show like that. In a way there is regression a bit in the freedom of people. Me, I always pay attention to not make other people unhappy; I am very free, but I don’t want to hurt anyone. Now there are a lot of other rules that magazines have to follow, there are the advertisers, so it is not totally freedom that you are living. For me what’s important is to feel free even when I respect all the people I am working with, all my advertisers, and I hope I can keep it this way, for a long time, this is my luxury. But I think for French magazines, they are not very far away from American or Japanese or English magazines now, no? What do you think, do you find a lot of difference? I think your era of Paris Vogue, it felt very different. Yes, I got a lot of letters. But you know, sometimes you never know what you are going to be attacked for. They attacked me for being racist because I painted Lara Stone in all the colors and in one photo she was painted in black. And I was the first one to put a girl like Liya Kebede from the cover to the entire issue, so people have a very short memory, you know. And one time I put a very oversized girl, because I have always liked oversized girls in a magazine, and I received a lot of letters, like, “Oh, why did you put this ugly girl in your magazine?” What have you thought of the couture shows so far? I think the Dior show was for me the best one of Raf’s so far. And I loved the shoes, the shoes were brilliant. It seems like he is gaining confidence. It really felt very strong. I am happy for him. I met Raf when he was very young, the long hair like a grungy boy when he started doing his collections, and we photographed with Mario Testino a lot at that time, it was a very long time ago. And I remember, I visited him and after I never met him again, and he is very shy, and I remember someone was calling him after a very long time, and I said, “Pass me the phone, I want to say congratulations.” And I said, “Raf, this is Carine, we met a very long time ago.” And he said, “I want to thank you for this shoot you did for me in Paris 15 years ago.” So he has a very good memory, he seems very nice, I would love to have a coffee with him once. So, looking forward to February and the shows, is there anything you have your eye on? No, honestly. It’s like everything, you are never looking for your boyfriend and suddenly you found your boyfriend. It’s the same for designers. You know Riccardo, his show, I went for the first time in Milan because my son, he was friends with Mariacarla [Boscono], and Mariacarla gave to my son the invitation of Riccardo, and for me he was no one. And I was like, “OK, I have a car and I have a bit of time,” and I was like, “OK, let’s go.” So I went to see that show and it was totally new, totally fresh, and it was very interesting. That’s the way I met Riccardo. Of course I am going to wait for J.W Anderson because it is exciting, of course I am going to wait for Christopher Kane because I have been following him from the beginning, but you never know what is going to be. I like to support new talent, I just regret not to support more before. It’s the next generation, we need them. It’s like Riccardo, he’s not so young anymore. I am so happy to see Hedi Slimane. I went to see his first show when he was working at YSL for men, and there was not more than 10 people in the room, and then they become like this, such a big success, so it makes you happy, you know, it makes you happy that you’ve known them for so many years. So yesterday I was backstage with Riccardo at Saint Laurent. I was between Riccardo and Hedi and it was a nice moment to be between two friends. Very talented friends. I say I am very gifted to have very talented friends. And they are friends together, too, they are old friends, as you may know. And what about Gucci, your old stomping grounds? I don’t know the guy [new creative director Alessandro Michele]. It was a bit like we took the assistant of the assistant. I didn’t see the men’s show, I do not know if you were in Milan. I only saw the pictures… What did you think? It was a bit different already… Yes, it was different. Maybe he is even looking at J.W. Anderson a little bit, that androgyny idea. Jonathan is a bit like the new one that everyone is looking at, he has the talent, he has a certain charisma. As for Gucci, I am more excited for the women’s show, I will say, than for the men’s show. I wonder what Tom Ford thought. I’m sure he still keeps an eye at what’s happening there. Of course. But you know, you cannot remake the game, you cannot remake the film. And sometimes I think if Tom Ford was going back to Gucci and he asked me to work with him, I would never say yes, because it’s done. But it was a very good moment. Everything was possible. Everything was free, and it was very fun to work with him. Who are the new photographers you’re working with? When you decide you want to work with the new photographers, do you feel it is a risk? Or do you really like… At the beginning, I had no choice. Other photographers, I was not allowed to work with then, but in a certain way it was a very good thing for me because it pushed me to find new ones. One is Michael Avedon—OK, he has a good name, but sometimes it can be even more difficult when you have a good name to be a photographer. He did the portfolio of “Jolie Laide,” and it is not easy to photograph a star and make her not as beautiful as people expect her to be. I think he did it in a very smart way; he is a very smart person. And there are a lot of amazing new girls in the issue. [We shot girls with] everything you think is not beautiful, you know, big ears. Big ears were always my complex because I have these ears coming out of my hair and now Karl [Lagerfeld, who did the shoot] loves this girl with the hair like that, so we say, “OK, good.” You know I think Karl is very risky, in casting and in advertising. Even when he is doing Chanel and Fendi, he will photograph other brands, which is rare. Right, he is not too proud? No, he is happy to photograph. He will say, “Oh, what’s that? Oh, I like it.” He is very professional, and I like that. There is a picture Karl did of me in my corset [in the issue]. One of my favorite stories in the issue is about destroyed jeans and T-shirts. Now if you want to buy destroyed jeans, it’s so much more expensive. Why? I think it’s very interesting how suddenly a destroyed T-shirt is more expensive than a new T-shirt. This is ugly beauty, too. So it is all linked in this issue. Kristen Stewart is part of the magazine. Is she? Yes, because I met her with Karl. And she is very special, too, she is not a perfect beauty. If she does not know you, sometimes she is very insecure. It is strange, but sometimes you are very beautiful and very insecure. Karl took a beautiful picture of her. She is very perfection in the photo. I made her look a bit like Patti Smith for the photo, and she was like, “I am just on the line with Patti Smith.” I said, “Oh, ask her what she thinks of the photo,” and she said that Patti liked it. I thought if Patti likes it, we can do it. I didn’t realize they were friends, because Patti Smith is always a big reference in fashion. Kristen is a funny girl, but you have to know her. She is quite shy at the beginning, you know. We all dream to be actresses—we all want to be Nicole Kidman and Angelina Jolie, but are they more happy than us? I’m not sure. It is difficult to be an actress, because when you are an actress, you can’t age. In fashion it is not easy, either, but usually I am not in front of the camera, I am behind, so it is easier for me. I think every beauty needs something weird—a little error or it’s not beautiful. You should also see: http://ourbdspace.com/blog/44013/beauty-with-a-thought-efva-attling/ https://www.bungie.net/en/Forum/Post/99057626
    Feb 06, 2015 355
  • 04 Feb 2015
    Valentine’s Day falls on a Saturday this year, and that's something of a game changer. The expectations will be high, and there's officially no excuse not to go all out. No pressure or anything. I asked Patti Stanger (of Bravo's Millionaire Matchmaker) how to make V Day 2015 live up to—dare I say exceed?—the hype. celebrity dresses If you’re single: “Get out of the house. Since it's a Saturday, hit a happy hour or do a pub crawl with a group of friends. Pick a street and bring your phone—you want to get home safely. Every single pub is going to have a Valentine’s Day theme. Everyone’s going to want to meet people, it’s the icebreaker.” If you’re on a budget: “Make your home into a spa. If you’re on a fixed income or just trying to save money, get some sushi at the grocery store, draw a bubble bath, and give each other massages. Keep it simple and romantic.” Or throw a really great Valentine's Day party. “Merge the couples with the singles. Why not have the couples bring in someone to set the singles up with? Couples don’t want to sit at the prix-fixe meal and wait forever at a restaurant. They want to help people find love because they’ve found love. So they can make it their project. Everybody brings somebody—just make sure there’s an even number of people. Don’t do a sit-down dinner; just do some great finger-food appetizers and wine. You don’t have to muss and fuss and make sangria, and you don’t have to be a millionaire to drink quality wine. [Stanger just launched her own line of wine, PS Match, this month.] Make a great playlist on Spotify, then have some games: Trivial Pursuit, even Spin the Bottle. When you get interactive, that’s when the fun stuff happens.” green prom dresses
    360 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • Valentine’s Day falls on a Saturday this year, and that's something of a game changer. The expectations will be high, and there's officially no excuse not to go all out. No pressure or anything. I asked Patti Stanger (of Bravo's Millionaire Matchmaker) how to make V Day 2015 live up to—dare I say exceed?—the hype. celebrity dresses If you’re single: “Get out of the house. Since it's a Saturday, hit a happy hour or do a pub crawl with a group of friends. Pick a street and bring your phone—you want to get home safely. Every single pub is going to have a Valentine’s Day theme. Everyone’s going to want to meet people, it’s the icebreaker.” If you’re on a budget: “Make your home into a spa. If you’re on a fixed income or just trying to save money, get some sushi at the grocery store, draw a bubble bath, and give each other massages. Keep it simple and romantic.” Or throw a really great Valentine's Day party. “Merge the couples with the singles. Why not have the couples bring in someone to set the singles up with? Couples don’t want to sit at the prix-fixe meal and wait forever at a restaurant. They want to help people find love because they’ve found love. So they can make it their project. Everybody brings somebody—just make sure there’s an even number of people. Don’t do a sit-down dinner; just do some great finger-food appetizers and wine. You don’t have to muss and fuss and make sangria, and you don’t have to be a millionaire to drink quality wine. [Stanger just launched her own line of wine, PS Match, this month.] Make a great playlist on Spotify, then have some games: Trivial Pursuit, even Spin the Bottle. When you get interactive, that’s when the fun stuff happens.” green prom dresses
    Feb 04, 2015 360
  • 02 Feb 2015
    1. Match your skin tone, not your dress If you are wearing something slinky, don’t get hung up on whether bridal underwear is “beautiful” or not – it probably won’t be. Above all, it needs to be functional, in a neutral colour match to your skin tone. Even ivory on pale skin can give a strobe-light effect and show through bias-cut dresses. Often, a dress is so figure-hugging that the only thing that is going to work is an all in one Spanx from right underneath the breasts. There’s nothing pretty or sexy about this kit, but it works. You can change into something more flattering for your wedding night if need be. 2. Pretty details are not your friend A satin bow will always show. One bride I designed for found a fine lace pair of knickers that matched her skin tone and thought they were invisible – until her groom pointed out the satin bow at the top, which showed through her dress. prom dresses 2015 3. ‘Tit tape’ has many uses If you’re going backless, try a backless bra with sticky wings, such as the Fashions Forms Go Bare Backless Strapless Bra, Black. They do work – but test them out first. One bride found a great strapless bra with not quite enough stickiness, so she covered every last millimetre of the inside of the cups in tit tape (double-sided tape for the body) as insurance. This is not an entirely glamorous story: the bra stuck to her skin so firmly that it took two bridesmaids to remove it when she tested it out, but it worked on the day. 4. Alterations aren’t just for your dress If you wish your bra was just a bit lower at the back, or don’t think it is going to stay up on its own, it is easy to alter it or stitch it into your dress. One bride I designed for took a shapewear slip, attached it to a bra with stick on tabs at the side, and had the back of the bra altered and lowered. Then she attached extra long white bra straps to the top. Admittedly, getting undressed afterwards was a bit of a mission. 5. Size matters This might be seem obvious point, but make sure you buy the right size knickers. Don’t be precious about it – going one size bigger than usual might help avoid bulging. But also be careful you don’t go too big, as I have heard of a bride who managed to lose her pants walking down the aisle. (Nb. Eagle-eyed bridesmaids are essential.) 6. Allow yourself a lot of time to select the right underwear This means trying out underwear at your dress fittings – not rushing out to buy it afterwards – and standing near the window during fittings so you are getting natural daylight to spot any lines. You should also take pictures of yourself from different angles to ensure flash photography won’t ruin the illusion. 7. Going commando is always an option If you want support but can’t find anything that doesn’t leave a visible line, you can always find a pair of seamless shapewear tights and chop off the feet and part of the legs. If you don’t need underwear for support then don’t bother wearing any – that’s one way to avoid the lines showing. In that case, do prepare for any weather, especially if you are not wearing a bra. Even summer evenings get chilly, and no one needs to see that much of the bride. blue prom dresses You should also see: http://www.leapzipblog.com/blog/read/176336/kit-willow-podgornik-back-with-a-positive-outlook-on-fashion/
    385 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • 1. Match your skin tone, not your dress If you are wearing something slinky, don’t get hung up on whether bridal underwear is “beautiful” or not – it probably won’t be. Above all, it needs to be functional, in a neutral colour match to your skin tone. Even ivory on pale skin can give a strobe-light effect and show through bias-cut dresses. Often, a dress is so figure-hugging that the only thing that is going to work is an all in one Spanx from right underneath the breasts. There’s nothing pretty or sexy about this kit, but it works. You can change into something more flattering for your wedding night if need be. 2. Pretty details are not your friend A satin bow will always show. One bride I designed for found a fine lace pair of knickers that matched her skin tone and thought they were invisible – until her groom pointed out the satin bow at the top, which showed through her dress. prom dresses 2015 3. ‘Tit tape’ has many uses If you’re going backless, try a backless bra with sticky wings, such as the Fashions Forms Go Bare Backless Strapless Bra, Black. They do work – but test them out first. One bride found a great strapless bra with not quite enough stickiness, so she covered every last millimetre of the inside of the cups in tit tape (double-sided tape for the body) as insurance. This is not an entirely glamorous story: the bra stuck to her skin so firmly that it took two bridesmaids to remove it when she tested it out, but it worked on the day. 4. Alterations aren’t just for your dress If you wish your bra was just a bit lower at the back, or don’t think it is going to stay up on its own, it is easy to alter it or stitch it into your dress. One bride I designed for took a shapewear slip, attached it to a bra with stick on tabs at the side, and had the back of the bra altered and lowered. Then she attached extra long white bra straps to the top. Admittedly, getting undressed afterwards was a bit of a mission. 5. Size matters This might be seem obvious point, but make sure you buy the right size knickers. Don’t be precious about it – going one size bigger than usual might help avoid bulging. But also be careful you don’t go too big, as I have heard of a bride who managed to lose her pants walking down the aisle. (Nb. Eagle-eyed bridesmaids are essential.) 6. Allow yourself a lot of time to select the right underwear This means trying out underwear at your dress fittings – not rushing out to buy it afterwards – and standing near the window during fittings so you are getting natural daylight to spot any lines. You should also take pictures of yourself from different angles to ensure flash photography won’t ruin the illusion. 7. Going commando is always an option If you want support but can’t find anything that doesn’t leave a visible line, you can always find a pair of seamless shapewear tights and chop off the feet and part of the legs. If you don’t need underwear for support then don’t bother wearing any – that’s one way to avoid the lines showing. In that case, do prepare for any weather, especially if you are not wearing a bra. Even summer evenings get chilly, and no one needs to see that much of the bride. blue prom dresses You should also see: http://www.leapzipblog.com/blog/read/176336/kit-willow-podgornik-back-with-a-positive-outlook-on-fashion/
    Feb 02, 2015 385
  • 29 Jan 2015
    Never mind Miley, or any other celebrity for that matter: At Copenhagen fashion week, you want Mary, Crown Princess of Denmark at your show. On the first day of the Copenhagen schedule, it was designer Mark Kenly Domino Tan who had the pleasure of welcoming the Danish royal. It made sense, considering the mid-century Dior riffs Tan explored via fluidly elegant silhouettes. But it wasn’t as proper as all that. Tan tweaked Greenlandic sealskin (traditionally a somewhat pedestrian fur to the Danes) to look like glossy mink or treated it to almost resemble coarse knitwear. Alongside the heavy furnishing fabrics Tan prefers, it laced the collection with the right kind of wrong. “Maybe a bit ugly in the right constellation—perfect but not perfect,” he said. red long prom dresses The day was one of contrasts, beginning with Fonnesbech’s sustainably produced, subdued musings on the liberated post-WWI woman and ending with art maverick Henrik Vibskov’s fun-house prints and surreal massage table tableaux of girls hidden under flesh-colored blankets and a sea of freaky undulating rubber hands. The show felt like a commentary on society’s obsession with weird beauty procedures, and Vibskov wasn’t the only designer eager to make a statement beyond clothes. Mads Nørgaard sent out a diverse street cast of Copenhagen kids in his cool wardrobe basics. “I enjoy making clothes that are worn by real people, not things that require a driver and a maid. But it cannot just be normcore. It has to be fashionable whilst being wearable.” Nørgaard’s sentiment sums up much of what Danish fashion is about. green prom dresses Denmark and its democratic fashions might not be subculture heaven, but Asger Juel Larsen tries his best to challenge that. This season, his goth boys invaded Hotel D’Angleterre’s genteel palm tree room in Victorian outerwear, spray-painted fake furs, and floral camouflage prints that made them look like army deserters on their way to an illegal rave. Sand designers Lene and Søren Sand, meanwhile, held an intimate gathering at their newly purchased palace of a home. (They normally work from their place near Lake Como.) The party was a rather sexed-up affair, with girls in bum-skimming lace dresses and boys in slick, metallic-hued suiting parading by.
    380 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • Never mind Miley, or any other celebrity for that matter: At Copenhagen fashion week, you want Mary, Crown Princess of Denmark at your show. On the first day of the Copenhagen schedule, it was designer Mark Kenly Domino Tan who had the pleasure of welcoming the Danish royal. It made sense, considering the mid-century Dior riffs Tan explored via fluidly elegant silhouettes. But it wasn’t as proper as all that. Tan tweaked Greenlandic sealskin (traditionally a somewhat pedestrian fur to the Danes) to look like glossy mink or treated it to almost resemble coarse knitwear. Alongside the heavy furnishing fabrics Tan prefers, it laced the collection with the right kind of wrong. “Maybe a bit ugly in the right constellation—perfect but not perfect,” he said. red long prom dresses The day was one of contrasts, beginning with Fonnesbech’s sustainably produced, subdued musings on the liberated post-WWI woman and ending with art maverick Henrik Vibskov’s fun-house prints and surreal massage table tableaux of girls hidden under flesh-colored blankets and a sea of freaky undulating rubber hands. The show felt like a commentary on society’s obsession with weird beauty procedures, and Vibskov wasn’t the only designer eager to make a statement beyond clothes. Mads Nørgaard sent out a diverse street cast of Copenhagen kids in his cool wardrobe basics. “I enjoy making clothes that are worn by real people, not things that require a driver and a maid. But it cannot just be normcore. It has to be fashionable whilst being wearable.” Nørgaard’s sentiment sums up much of what Danish fashion is about. green prom dresses Denmark and its democratic fashions might not be subculture heaven, but Asger Juel Larsen tries his best to challenge that. This season, his goth boys invaded Hotel D’Angleterre’s genteel palm tree room in Victorian outerwear, spray-painted fake furs, and floral camouflage prints that made them look like army deserters on their way to an illegal rave. Sand designers Lene and Søren Sand, meanwhile, held an intimate gathering at their newly purchased palace of a home. (They normally work from their place near Lake Como.) The party was a rather sexed-up affair, with girls in bum-skimming lace dresses and boys in slick, metallic-hued suiting parading by.
    Jan 29, 2015 380
  • 27 Jan 2015
    The couture collections in Paris have to be my favorite fashion shows of the year. Maybe it's because there's an element of mystery to the shows or the fact that the front row is filled with more high-rollers than bored celebrities. Or perhaps it's because the clothes are so fantastical (both in quality and in price). Or maybe it's the fact that the hair and makeup looks are never boring or expected. Rarely is there "no-makeup makeup" or "natural hair" on a couture runway. The beauty looks at these shows aren't meant to be wearable or translatable in real life, and maybe that's why I love them so much. They are a testament to the fact that makeup and hairstyling are true art forms, just as much as painting or singing or dancing. And with that in mind, here are the masterpieces so far from the spring 2015 couture runways this week. prom dresses uk Christian Dior. Hairstylist Guido described this look as a "couture ponytail," in that it was both simple and yet highly stylized at the same time. And he's right: Look at the models from the front and you might not notice anything special. But as they turn around, you see all the amazing little details, like the fact the ponytail isn't actually attached to the model's head but rather hanging from colorful metal rings attached to the hair, which is tied up in a short loop; the volume at the crown that created a graphic silhouette; and the hair at the nape of the neck, tucked tightly under the top of the hair to create the illusion of an undercut. It's a ponytail you may want to try at home, but you might pull a muscle in the process. short black prom dresses Versace. Pat McGrath's graphic eyeliner was one part Elizabeth Taylor in Cleopatra and one part '60s Edie Sedgwick. However, thanks to the glossiness of the black and blue eyeliners and the diffused pigment around the models' eyes, the look felt more rock and roll than retro. I also love how the strong definition in the creases and along the lash lines (and white liner in the inner rims) made the models' eyes look huge, even with the darkness encircling them. Schiaparelli. There were so many awesome hairstyles at the Schiaparelli show that I lost count. Everything from shiny bowl cuts and disco-era bouffants to Princess Leia buns and helmets made of braids. But one of my favorite looks from the show was this cornrowed look, in which the ends of the tiny braids were looped back up, creating a contrast between the strict, graphic quality of the cornrows and the soft, swingy-ness of the braided ends. Chanel. The flower festival at Chanel's couture show this morning wasn't just made up of the 300 mechanical blooms decorating the set. It also included the delicate fabric flowers tied to the ends of the models' loose braids and a tulip-pink lip that looked striking peeking out from under oversize hats and black violets. Leave it to Karl Lagerfeld to make pink-flower hair accessories cool again. You should also see: http://pollinatorpartners.com/profiles/blogs/fashion-firm-dressed-for-success
    298 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • The couture collections in Paris have to be my favorite fashion shows of the year. Maybe it's because there's an element of mystery to the shows or the fact that the front row is filled with more high-rollers than bored celebrities. Or perhaps it's because the clothes are so fantastical (both in quality and in price). Or maybe it's the fact that the hair and makeup looks are never boring or expected. Rarely is there "no-makeup makeup" or "natural hair" on a couture runway. The beauty looks at these shows aren't meant to be wearable or translatable in real life, and maybe that's why I love them so much. They are a testament to the fact that makeup and hairstyling are true art forms, just as much as painting or singing or dancing. And with that in mind, here are the masterpieces so far from the spring 2015 couture runways this week. prom dresses uk Christian Dior. Hairstylist Guido described this look as a "couture ponytail," in that it was both simple and yet highly stylized at the same time. And he's right: Look at the models from the front and you might not notice anything special. But as they turn around, you see all the amazing little details, like the fact the ponytail isn't actually attached to the model's head but rather hanging from colorful metal rings attached to the hair, which is tied up in a short loop; the volume at the crown that created a graphic silhouette; and the hair at the nape of the neck, tucked tightly under the top of the hair to create the illusion of an undercut. It's a ponytail you may want to try at home, but you might pull a muscle in the process. short black prom dresses Versace. Pat McGrath's graphic eyeliner was one part Elizabeth Taylor in Cleopatra and one part '60s Edie Sedgwick. However, thanks to the glossiness of the black and blue eyeliners and the diffused pigment around the models' eyes, the look felt more rock and roll than retro. I also love how the strong definition in the creases and along the lash lines (and white liner in the inner rims) made the models' eyes look huge, even with the darkness encircling them. Schiaparelli. There were so many awesome hairstyles at the Schiaparelli show that I lost count. Everything from shiny bowl cuts and disco-era bouffants to Princess Leia buns and helmets made of braids. But one of my favorite looks from the show was this cornrowed look, in which the ends of the tiny braids were looped back up, creating a contrast between the strict, graphic quality of the cornrows and the soft, swingy-ness of the braided ends. Chanel. The flower festival at Chanel's couture show this morning wasn't just made up of the 300 mechanical blooms decorating the set. It also included the delicate fabric flowers tied to the ends of the models' loose braids and a tulip-pink lip that looked striking peeking out from under oversize hats and black violets. Leave it to Karl Lagerfeld to make pink-flower hair accessories cool again. You should also see: http://pollinatorpartners.com/profiles/blogs/fashion-firm-dressed-for-success
    Jan 27, 2015 298
  • 25 Jan 2015
    Perhaps it’s all the uniforms cropping up all over the place, or maybe it was Raf Simons’ opening gambit, glorifying his own university years on Wednesday evening, but there’s been a back-to-school feeling at the Paris menswear shows. Many editors share said feeling – bleary-eyed and pale under recently-acquired holiday tans, with shell-shocked expression as they launched into a fully-fledged fashion month barely a week into the new year. Amongst designers, generally, there’s a studious earnestness, to see ideas through, to cross t’s and dot i’s. But, alas, there hasn’t been much deep and meaningful. Kim Jones’ Louis Vuitton collection is the perfect summary of the remerging mood of ticking boxes rather than plucking heart-strings. It was exemplary, and has been highly-feted as a well-executed expression of an admirable idea. Which was an issue. An ode to the menswear maverick Christopher Nemeth, Jones’s Vuitton collection felt like a perfectly-punctuated essay rather than the free-falling, joyous creative splurge Nemeth warranted. It was far too well-behaved, far too studious. You wanted to Jones to lighten up and let his ideas really rip. Looking at the knotted Nemeth patterns that wriggled over the ship-shape Louis Vuitton clothes – duffles and pea-coats, sweaters, lots and lots (and lots) of bags – they were outré, but not nearly enough. It would take a courageous man to wear them, so you wondered why Jones didn’t indulge himself and his potential customer and offer something truly extraordinary? Especially when it’s an adjective applicable to Jones and Nemeth’s best work alike. prom dresses 2014 Thom Browne didn’t look to his school days – alas. Imagine how toe-curlingly appropriate that would be? But the Browne boy has a uniform as rigid and archaic as any British public school’s. This season, it was funereal fashion, with models kitted out like the plumed pit-ponies that tugged Victorian hearses in black veils and top-hats. Even under all that fuss and bother, Browne’s silhouette – that shrunken jacket hiked up the torso and exposing a good inch of wrist, those abbreviated trousers above clunky brogues – sings out. And it is unmistakably Browne’s, despite his legions of copyists. And so, to Riccardo Tisci. If Tisci was a schoolchild, he’d be the cleverest in the class: or, at least, the one clever enough never to get caught. Riccardo Tisci knows how to copy well, how to lift a silhouette or a decorative motif and reiterate it, at just the right time, with his own handwriting. He sometimes recycles his own back-catalogue (the crystal-crusted face masks he cajoled out of Pat McGrath for his spring 2014 womenswear show made a re-appearance on his menswear catwalk Friday night). Undoubtedly, he’s obsessed with making Givenchy a label inextricably tied to his own identity, hence all those crucifixes, and the bold badges branding “17” across the models’ chests – 17 being the age Riccardo Tisci left Italy to study in London. There’s a strength in numbers with Tisci – he showed 61 looks, including half-a-dozen womenswear, a stylistic zoetrope whizzing by at such a breakneck speed it scrambled your perceptions of the designer’s reference-points and riffing on the work of Maison Martin Margiela, Jean Paul Gaultier and John Galliano, amongst others. Despite those branding, self-aggrandising badges festooning everything with his “signatures,” very little of what we saw on the Givenchy catwalk felt like it originated with Tisci. But, ultimately, does that matter if the retail sums add up? blue prom dresses Jonathan Anderson’s Loewe also borrows liberally from other hands. He’s very open about that. For winter he pointed at a checkerboard suit in garish multicolour and recalls the work of Todd Oldham, in itself an echo of the work of Mr Freedom, Granny Takes A Trip and Bus Stop in the 1960s. Was Oldham copying? And by copying a copy, does Anderson come up with something new? Those are awfully deep and meaningful questions – much deeper than Anderson really cares to go. He describes his Loewe menswear propositions as “fragments,” and compared to the often unpalatable total looks Anderson shows on his menswear catwalk in London, Loewe is chopped into easily-digestible chunks. The chunks Anderson blew across the Loewe showroom this time included shearling-collared pea-coats, crunchy polo-shirts, puddling synthetic trousers with tracksuit stripes up the side and irridesent mohair sweaters (who knew you could get lurex mohair?). The look book images Anderson created with Jamie Hawkesworth – or the campaign currently festooning Paris, shot by Steven Meisel and previewing these winter clothes – present an alarmingly sway-hipped, oxford-bagged bloke in the Sebastian Flyte mould of delicate manhood. It would scare away most Loewe customers – but the majority will see these clothes as Anderson’s fragments, and will buy them as such. Head-to-toe luxury for the truly discerning man is terribly tough to pull off. Véronique Nichanian manages it with an enviable ease at Hermes. Which isn’t to say that her work doesn’t deserve an A for effort. After all, it’s not easy to make tracksuit trousers out of sheared mink or a sweatshirt out of crocodile. Actually, it is – but it’s not easy to make clothes equally as luxurious that have impact for consumers and press without falling into posh parody. Nichanian does that, using stuff like silk and cashmere that doesn’t scream about its fabrication, in gentle shades of brown and grey, enlivened with touches of blackcurrant and brilliant gooseberry chartreuse. Nichanian has enough nous to know that while the crocodile and mink will grab column inches and, perhaps, attract a few flashier clients, most men want to buy the quiet stuff. The stuff you don’t need to study too hard to know it has class. You should also see: http://facebookhitlist.com/profiles/blogs/glee-character-comes-out-as-a-trans-man http://www.friendku.com/blog.php?user=4826&blogentry_id=46207
    494 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • Perhaps it’s all the uniforms cropping up all over the place, or maybe it was Raf Simons’ opening gambit, glorifying his own university years on Wednesday evening, but there’s been a back-to-school feeling at the Paris menswear shows. Many editors share said feeling – bleary-eyed and pale under recently-acquired holiday tans, with shell-shocked expression as they launched into a fully-fledged fashion month barely a week into the new year. Amongst designers, generally, there’s a studious earnestness, to see ideas through, to cross t’s and dot i’s. But, alas, there hasn’t been much deep and meaningful. Kim Jones’ Louis Vuitton collection is the perfect summary of the remerging mood of ticking boxes rather than plucking heart-strings. It was exemplary, and has been highly-feted as a well-executed expression of an admirable idea. Which was an issue. An ode to the menswear maverick Christopher Nemeth, Jones’s Vuitton collection felt like a perfectly-punctuated essay rather than the free-falling, joyous creative splurge Nemeth warranted. It was far too well-behaved, far too studious. You wanted to Jones to lighten up and let his ideas really rip. Looking at the knotted Nemeth patterns that wriggled over the ship-shape Louis Vuitton clothes – duffles and pea-coats, sweaters, lots and lots (and lots) of bags – they were outré, but not nearly enough. It would take a courageous man to wear them, so you wondered why Jones didn’t indulge himself and his potential customer and offer something truly extraordinary? Especially when it’s an adjective applicable to Jones and Nemeth’s best work alike. prom dresses 2014 Thom Browne didn’t look to his school days – alas. Imagine how toe-curlingly appropriate that would be? But the Browne boy has a uniform as rigid and archaic as any British public school’s. This season, it was funereal fashion, with models kitted out like the plumed pit-ponies that tugged Victorian hearses in black veils and top-hats. Even under all that fuss and bother, Browne’s silhouette – that shrunken jacket hiked up the torso and exposing a good inch of wrist, those abbreviated trousers above clunky brogues – sings out. And it is unmistakably Browne’s, despite his legions of copyists. And so, to Riccardo Tisci. If Tisci was a schoolchild, he’d be the cleverest in the class: or, at least, the one clever enough never to get caught. Riccardo Tisci knows how to copy well, how to lift a silhouette or a decorative motif and reiterate it, at just the right time, with his own handwriting. He sometimes recycles his own back-catalogue (the crystal-crusted face masks he cajoled out of Pat McGrath for his spring 2014 womenswear show made a re-appearance on his menswear catwalk Friday night). Undoubtedly, he’s obsessed with making Givenchy a label inextricably tied to his own identity, hence all those crucifixes, and the bold badges branding “17” across the models’ chests – 17 being the age Riccardo Tisci left Italy to study in London. There’s a strength in numbers with Tisci – he showed 61 looks, including half-a-dozen womenswear, a stylistic zoetrope whizzing by at such a breakneck speed it scrambled your perceptions of the designer’s reference-points and riffing on the work of Maison Martin Margiela, Jean Paul Gaultier and John Galliano, amongst others. Despite those branding, self-aggrandising badges festooning everything with his “signatures,” very little of what we saw on the Givenchy catwalk felt like it originated with Tisci. But, ultimately, does that matter if the retail sums add up? blue prom dresses Jonathan Anderson’s Loewe also borrows liberally from other hands. He’s very open about that. For winter he pointed at a checkerboard suit in garish multicolour and recalls the work of Todd Oldham, in itself an echo of the work of Mr Freedom, Granny Takes A Trip and Bus Stop in the 1960s. Was Oldham copying? And by copying a copy, does Anderson come up with something new? Those are awfully deep and meaningful questions – much deeper than Anderson really cares to go. He describes his Loewe menswear propositions as “fragments,” and compared to the often unpalatable total looks Anderson shows on his menswear catwalk in London, Loewe is chopped into easily-digestible chunks. The chunks Anderson blew across the Loewe showroom this time included shearling-collared pea-coats, crunchy polo-shirts, puddling synthetic trousers with tracksuit stripes up the side and irridesent mohair sweaters (who knew you could get lurex mohair?). The look book images Anderson created with Jamie Hawkesworth – or the campaign currently festooning Paris, shot by Steven Meisel and previewing these winter clothes – present an alarmingly sway-hipped, oxford-bagged bloke in the Sebastian Flyte mould of delicate manhood. It would scare away most Loewe customers – but the majority will see these clothes as Anderson’s fragments, and will buy them as such. Head-to-toe luxury for the truly discerning man is terribly tough to pull off. Véronique Nichanian manages it with an enviable ease at Hermes. Which isn’t to say that her work doesn’t deserve an A for effort. After all, it’s not easy to make tracksuit trousers out of sheared mink or a sweatshirt out of crocodile. Actually, it is – but it’s not easy to make clothes equally as luxurious that have impact for consumers and press without falling into posh parody. Nichanian does that, using stuff like silk and cashmere that doesn’t scream about its fabrication, in gentle shades of brown and grey, enlivened with touches of blackcurrant and brilliant gooseberry chartreuse. Nichanian has enough nous to know that while the crocodile and mink will grab column inches and, perhaps, attract a few flashier clients, most men want to buy the quiet stuff. The stuff you don’t need to study too hard to know it has class. You should also see: http://facebookhitlist.com/profiles/blogs/glee-character-comes-out-as-a-trans-man http://www.friendku.com/blog.php?user=4826&blogentry_id=46207
    Jan 25, 2015 494
  • 22 Jan 2015
    By now we're all familiar with no-makeup makeup. We saw it at more than half of the spring 2015 fashion shows, with a few designers taking it to the extreme and sending models down the runway with literally no makeup. Let's get real, though. Appearing as if you're not wearing a speck of makeup isn't the same as not wearing a speck of makeup. Especially if you're not a 16-year-old Eastern European who won the genetic lottery. When I leave the house without anything on my face, I look pretty rough. Like, I-just-raged-all-night-with-a-bottle-of-tequila rough. (OK, maybe not that bad, but you get the picture.) The right tricks, however, can make you look like you rolled out of bed with flawless skin, bright eyes, and naturally rosy lips. Lucky for you, we've got them all right here. Start fresh. "This look is 50 percent makeup, 50 percent skin care, because well-hydrated skin looks so luminous," makeup artist Tom Pecheux once told me backstage at a Balmain show. And Pecheux's prep routine is no joke. He starts by massaging the skin with a few drops of Rodin Olio Lusso, followed by a serum and a classic moisturizer. It sounds crazy, but there's actually a method to his madness: Dermatologists say layering multiple skin-care products traps more active ingredients against your skin, so every product you use works better (which means better-looking skin). red long prom dresses Even things out. Before you reach for the foundation, try a primer with a hint of pink for fair skin (like Maybelline New York Instant Age Rewind Primer) or lavender for medium to dark skin (such as Clinique Superprimer for Sallowness). If redness is your problem (like me) go for a green-tinted primer (I use Make Up For Ever HD Microperfecting Primer in Green). If you're in your 20s, a thin layer all over may be all you need. If you're old enough to no longer get carded, you'll still be able to wear less foundation if you start with primer. Use foundation as concealer. Since foundation is more sheer than concealer, it will give you coverage without looking too makeup-y. "Smooth a dot or two under your eyes and around your nostrils," says makeup artist Susie Sobol. Then blend it around the inner corners of your eyes, where the bridge of your nose can cast shadows. If the idea of going out with this little makeup gives you a panic attack, put one more drop of foundation on your sponge or fingertip and press it over any areas that need more coverage. "The dabbing motion adds more pigment than spreading," says Pecheux. Glow, don't flush. If your skin is normal to dry, go for a cream blush without any shimmer. If your skin is oily, use powder blush and a domed, densely packed brush. Either way, look for a muted pink or berry tone that looks a little dull in the pot. Trust us, on your skin it's the best option. Choose a pinkish-nude for fair skin (like Aerin Multi Color for Lips and Cheeks), a coral-brown for olive skin (try Stila Convertible Color in Camellia), or a deep burgundy for dark skin (we like Bobbi Brown Pot Rouge in Chocolate Cherry). In a pinch, you can always swirl blush and matte bronzer together to create a more natural-looking shade. Rethink highlighter. Pick cream over powder; the latter tends to look chalky. Choose champagne for fair skin, gold for olive skin, or copper or bronze for dark complexions. Spread it over your cheekbones with your fingers, then brush a light layer of translucent powder on top—a trick makeup artist Pat McGrath uses to make skin look dewy, not shimmery. If that sounds like a lot of work, tap a clear balm over your cheekbones. "It reflects the light and creates a pretty glow without any sparkle or color," says makeup artist Lucia Pieroni. Don't forget your lips. A sheer tinted balm, like Smith's Rosebud Salve, is the easiest way to boost your natural lip color. But if your lips are naturally quite pale, try a sheer lip crayon or a lipstick a touch darker than your natural lip color. However, don't apply lipstick straight from the tube. It will look too intense when you want to look bare-faced. Instead, swipe a finger over the top of the bullet and press the color on your mouth. mermaid prom dresses You should also see: http://catertown.com/profiles/blogs/gauri-khan-turns-designer-for-satya-paul-s-30th-anniversary http://yoamoabarranquilla.com/profiles/blogs/fashion-news-latest-from-the-world-of-fashion
    362 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • By now we're all familiar with no-makeup makeup. We saw it at more than half of the spring 2015 fashion shows, with a few designers taking it to the extreme and sending models down the runway with literally no makeup. Let's get real, though. Appearing as if you're not wearing a speck of makeup isn't the same as not wearing a speck of makeup. Especially if you're not a 16-year-old Eastern European who won the genetic lottery. When I leave the house without anything on my face, I look pretty rough. Like, I-just-raged-all-night-with-a-bottle-of-tequila rough. (OK, maybe not that bad, but you get the picture.) The right tricks, however, can make you look like you rolled out of bed with flawless skin, bright eyes, and naturally rosy lips. Lucky for you, we've got them all right here. Start fresh. "This look is 50 percent makeup, 50 percent skin care, because well-hydrated skin looks so luminous," makeup artist Tom Pecheux once told me backstage at a Balmain show. And Pecheux's prep routine is no joke. He starts by massaging the skin with a few drops of Rodin Olio Lusso, followed by a serum and a classic moisturizer. It sounds crazy, but there's actually a method to his madness: Dermatologists say layering multiple skin-care products traps more active ingredients against your skin, so every product you use works better (which means better-looking skin). red long prom dresses Even things out. Before you reach for the foundation, try a primer with a hint of pink for fair skin (like Maybelline New York Instant Age Rewind Primer) or lavender for medium to dark skin (such as Clinique Superprimer for Sallowness). If redness is your problem (like me) go for a green-tinted primer (I use Make Up For Ever HD Microperfecting Primer in Green). If you're in your 20s, a thin layer all over may be all you need. If you're old enough to no longer get carded, you'll still be able to wear less foundation if you start with primer. Use foundation as concealer. Since foundation is more sheer than concealer, it will give you coverage without looking too makeup-y. "Smooth a dot or two under your eyes and around your nostrils," says makeup artist Susie Sobol. Then blend it around the inner corners of your eyes, where the bridge of your nose can cast shadows. If the idea of going out with this little makeup gives you a panic attack, put one more drop of foundation on your sponge or fingertip and press it over any areas that need more coverage. "The dabbing motion adds more pigment than spreading," says Pecheux. Glow, don't flush. If your skin is normal to dry, go for a cream blush without any shimmer. If your skin is oily, use powder blush and a domed, densely packed brush. Either way, look for a muted pink or berry tone that looks a little dull in the pot. Trust us, on your skin it's the best option. Choose a pinkish-nude for fair skin (like Aerin Multi Color for Lips and Cheeks), a coral-brown for olive skin (try Stila Convertible Color in Camellia), or a deep burgundy for dark skin (we like Bobbi Brown Pot Rouge in Chocolate Cherry). In a pinch, you can always swirl blush and matte bronzer together to create a more natural-looking shade. Rethink highlighter. Pick cream over powder; the latter tends to look chalky. Choose champagne for fair skin, gold for olive skin, or copper or bronze for dark complexions. Spread it over your cheekbones with your fingers, then brush a light layer of translucent powder on top—a trick makeup artist Pat McGrath uses to make skin look dewy, not shimmery. If that sounds like a lot of work, tap a clear balm over your cheekbones. "It reflects the light and creates a pretty glow without any sparkle or color," says makeup artist Lucia Pieroni. Don't forget your lips. A sheer tinted balm, like Smith's Rosebud Salve, is the easiest way to boost your natural lip color. But if your lips are naturally quite pale, try a sheer lip crayon or a lipstick a touch darker than your natural lip color. However, don't apply lipstick straight from the tube. It will look too intense when you want to look bare-faced. Instead, swipe a finger over the top of the bullet and press the color on your mouth. mermaid prom dresses You should also see: http://catertown.com/profiles/blogs/gauri-khan-turns-designer-for-satya-paul-s-30th-anniversary http://yoamoabarranquilla.com/profiles/blogs/fashion-news-latest-from-the-world-of-fashion
    Jan 22, 2015 362

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  • 05 Oct 2014
    Day 1 of the first Myntra Fashion Weekend, which is being held at Palladium Hotel in Mumbai, ended on a highly confident and sexy note as designers, especially the last two, amped up the show. Mumbai-based designer Pria Kataaria Puri, who is famous for her kaftans and sexy resort wear, brought to the ramp a vibrant, abstract and energetic collection. Her show started off in vivid orange-toned ensembles worn by five bloggers-Malini Agarwal aka MissMalini, Rhea Gupte, Aanam Chasmawala, Scherezade Shroff and Karishma Rajani. Carrying on the show, models sauntered down cheerfully. This amiable presentation was a pleasant break from the usual frigid style, and kept the audience smiling as well. The boho luxe collection included jersey dresses, kaftans, oneshoulder shirts, crop tops and midi skirts in colourful carpet prints. pink prom dresses Delhi-boy Raakesh Agarvwal, meanwhile, brought back his 'Seduce Not Control' collection to the runway for A/W 2014, which he showcased earlier this year in the Capital. Bondage, leather and bling were the keywords at the show that added a high-octane punch of glamour in black, gold and nude. Special hair nets and smeared red lipstick styled by Adhuna Akhtar and her B:BLUNT team added an interesting feel to the models' look. Despite the comparatively low turnout owing to Dussehra celebrations, the show was high on energy. The second day began on a highly quirky note, with celebrity stylist Ami Patel curating a playful, American vintage collection comprising two trends-indigo and clashing prints. Cigarette pants, front-tied shirts, wrap around dresses and shift dresses for women; and striped T-shirts, checked collar shirts and sweatshirts for men made the show. Actress Kalki Koechlin walked the ramp as a pretty pin-up girl in a halter neck, cream-coloured swing dress with lace border. A big orange bow over a faux bob, strappy floral heels and a big purple envelope bag added charm to Kalki's look. Adding to the cute look, the good sport did a small jig on stage with funny man Cyrus Broacha who got all the laughs for sporting a fake mustache and flowers in his hair while dressed in a superhero tee and a lungi casually wrapped around his jeans paired with red sneakers. Kalki even teased Broacha by trying to pull his lungi off, leaving the audience in a spirited mood. Meanwhile, Bringing work essentials to the afternoon, AND by Anita Dongre presented chic pencil dresses, trousers and shirts with interesting cuts and collars primarily in black, grey and white. chiffon prom dress
    1429 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • 30 Dec 2014
    I’m still skeeved out by Apollo’s grabbiness last week. After all that, it’s surprising he’s nowhere to be found this time around, but then again, is it really? He clearly gives zero shits about his kids at this point, which is sad, because his are so cute, and that whole bedtime routine melted my cold, cold heart. Phaedra is on the “rough side of the mountain” with all of it, but still salty enough to say he should have married a wallflower if he couldn’t handle her boss-ness. Her success isn’t the problem, though! I don’t know about either of them right now — Phaedra really did try to bring Apollo into her path of 1 million businesses, but she also never stopped to ask what he wanted. And what he wants is to act like a 20-year-old unencumbered idiot man, apparently. All I know is Ayden saying, “Mr. President, we need you!” is enough to make me wish I could adopt them both. It’s good that Kandi and her family, the Boomhauers, are subtitled, because the lockjaw that seems to run rampant in their gene pool makes my head hurt. Are cast members contractually obligated to spill the beans about every single conversation they have? Kandi wasted no time telling her mom about everything Sharon said, which gave the Mumbles Sisters a chance to trot out old-timey, nonsensical sayings like “Can’t come at me like a cabbage” and “Don’t come with all head and no ass.” You know that thing where you get your porn name if you combine your first pet’s name and the name of the street you grew up on (Rambo Smith, nice to meet you)? If you want to sound like Kandi’s mom and aunts, take the brand names of two types of food and combine it with your least favorite member of One Direction. “I told her not to take Hellman’s mayonnaise to my Hershey’s Kisses if she didn’t want to Harry my Styles.” Joyce’s new house deal went through and there was some conversation about how she wouldn’t give Kandi the keys, but all it does is confirm that she’s a garbage barge in the shape of a woman. Todd tried to talk to Kandi about it, but she did her usual thing of flapping her wings and flying away. I agree with him — they should totally have separate holidays if Joyce is going to be anywhere on the premises, because Kandi’s family is stubborn to the point of completely ridiculous. Basically, Sharon is dead, Kandi’s mom will never apologize, and I hope the Burusses all feel like absolute shit forever, amen. http://www.kissydress.co.uk/pink-prom-dresses 

I think Derek J breaks out his curling iron the way most people give a handshake. Cynthia tried to direct a makeover for Claudia even though she was dressed like an exploded hot dog, and he immediately started curling Claudia’s hair while they were talking about what he was going to actually do to her hair. Is that normal? I do my own hair so I don’t know how normal people work. NeNe sent Cynthia a text and invited her out to drinks, which Cynthia had to narrate before making a decision to go. They’re really pushing the fact that Claudia is biracial, which is confounding since she’s actually smart and interesting, but at least this week we get to meet her mom and grandmother. Can we take a moment to praise Lillian, her 90-year-old grandma who thinks women get big butts from eating too much and flirts with valets? I goddamn love her! Claudia did a good job of pretending that she chose a drag-queen bar for lunch instead of one of Bravo’s production assistants, and then pushed a really awkward conversation about how her mom never said “I love you” while a heavily made-up drag queen took their fruity-drink orders. It has to suck to have a parent never say I love you, but her mom made a good case with her “words mean nothing, I show you I love you with action” argument. She was like, “Oh, sorry I never say I love you. I only write it on everything and raised your ass by myself for your entire life.” Why is Kenya getting an office for a job she doesn’t have yet? As much as saying “put me in a TV show!” seems to be how TV shows in Atlanta get made, getting an office just because you thought about getting a job is totally legit! I want to see Brandon’s glitter floor, but none of this seems feasible in the real world. Cynthia demanded that Kenya join her for this drinks meeting NeNe is putting together, and watching her flex continues to remind me of the little kid boss in BoJack Horseman. I love that they showed us how much the rent cost — it’s been so long since the RHOA franchise put a price tag on anything! 
NeNe hasn’t stopped getting on my nerves since last season, but the fakeness this episode made my eyes twitch. It was pretty funny when she said she was “looking for a girl with a lot of weave in her hair” and the host pointed directly to Porsha, and how NeNe called back to She by Sheree (R.I.P.) by saying a video party without the video was like a fashion show with no fashions, but this drinks meeting pushed NeNe over the edge into asshole territory. The Hotwives of Orlando spoof came true last night when NeNe invited Porsha, Kenya, and Cynthia out for drinks to tell them she doesn’t want to be friends with them, but also wants to squash their beef, but not really? 

 The first round was NeNe and Cynthia, but Kenya kept butting in so they both told her to shut up. Porsha and Kenya leave, and Cynthia and NeNe sort of work it out — NeNe said she might call Cynthia for lunch in a couple of years, and Cynthia kissed her a lot and gave that fake “I’m sorry if you think I hurt you” apology. As soon as they were done NeNe asked Cynthia to move so Porsha could sit in her spot. Friendship is great! These two are monsters. 

Round two was Cynthia and Porsha. NeNe and Kenya left to get drinks, then came back and loudly yelled “Cynthia! Porsha! Cynthia! Porsha!” until Porsha flipped out on Kenya. NeNe was yelling, too, but only Kenya got the brunt of it, because Porsha is hell-bent on holding a grudge. Cynthia and Porsha healed their rift, sort of? They hugged, which is housewife for “Bitch, I might.” The final round was Kenya and Porsha, which is like trying to get honey badger to play with a snake. The surprising thing is that Kenya was the voice of reason — she kept saying everyone had a lot to be ashamed about and wanted to just move on while Porsha talked about needing the right energy for people to approach her. Excuse me, are you Miss Cleo? Kenya got up to hug her, and Porsha said, “Well if you’re accepting responsibility for everything that’s fine,” like the spoiled brat she is. I know we’re eight episodes in but I seriously cannot believe she’s put us in a position to forgive Kenya and make her seem like the normal one! The owner of the bar came out and Kenya flashed her legs at him, so now NeNe wants to be her best friend. Until next week, that is! Cynthia and Peter are moving into a trash heap so their house will finally match their personalities, NeNe acts like an asshole to Claudia for no reason at all, and there’s a Roger Bob prayer circle when Kandi’s cast tells Kandi they all dated him. See you then! one shoulder prom dresses You should also see: http://plaza.rakuten.co.jp/aprilohare/diary/201412290000/ http://sylviamarra.blogdetik.com/2014/12/29/street-seen-leesa-lambert/
    899 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • 14 Dec 2014
    Sir New York is the brainchild of designer Auston Björkman, the first openly transgender designer to emerge on the high-end fashion scene. A crossover brand, Björkman's designs have been seen across the spectrum, from big names in hip hop and rap to prominent drag queens emerging from "RuPaul's Drag Race." Read the interview below to learn more. The Huffington Post: What types of clothing does Sir New York tend to produce? Auston Björkman: I was recently looking back at some planning I had done in the beginning and saw that I didn't even know exactly what to call it -- I was using the term Technical Tailored Sportswear. Complex Magazine aptly named us as the start of "athletic street goth," which I love, but I would say both have something true, in capturing some of the essence of what is in the brand. What is your focus for Sir New York? Do you specifically intend for your designs to be for the queer and trans community? chiffon prom dresses No, I never wanted Sir New York to be for any specific type of person. If anything my thinking was way too broad. I wanted all genders -- everyone wears menswear. I wanted to appeal to the boy next door who likes clothes, to the club kids who are all about turning a look, to the fashion kids who pay attention to design. Whenever you study fashion they really try to make you hone in on "your customer." But my vision is exactly what happened, with people wearing my designs like A$AP Ferg, Wiz Kalifa and Detox from "RuPaul's Drag Race" -- who has worn it in and out of drag. You're hailed as the first trans male designer to emerge in the high-end fashion scene. What have the reception and your experiences been like? My experiences in the fashion world have been interesting. It is a very intense and tightly orchestrated industry with billions of dollars dedicated to making you want to look a certain way. It's very hard for the majority of fashion designers ever to even get to this level and I am far from where I ultimately want to be... I'm still very much an "outsider." I think most people don't automatically assume I am trans. Most people only get as far as thinking I'm this odd little gay fashion designer. The fashion industry has historically been open to all kinds of gender expression and misfits, so I don't think I stand out in any kind of loud way -- partly because that is my nature. I would rather let my work speak for me. I tend to talk about my work and not me, the person. So the positive reception I have gotten from both street wear and high-end fashion has been very much in response to the clothing, the brand and the aesthetic. I think I have a unique perspective on the gender spectrum. I don't believe in absolutes, nothing belongs solely to masculine or feminine. I like finding subtle balances. Where have your designs appeared? backless prom dresses Usher came into our pop up shop with Liberty Fairs Concept Space in Los Angeles, copped a grip of the Seahole Future Surf gear and the next day it was on "The Voice." French Montana has also worn it in videos and interviews and I saw my first stranger on the street rocking it, which is strangely a whole different amazing feeling of accomplishment than when someone high-profile is wearing it. Seeing it in print is also really exciting: Vogue Italia, Flaunt, GQ. I don't know, I guess we're getting around a little bit. Do you have any showcases on the horizon? Sir New York previewed our AW15 collection and hosted a mini pop-up shop last weekend at dapperQ's "(un)Heeled: A Fashion Show for the Uncoventionally Masculine" at the Brooklyn Museum. "(un)Heeled" celebrated the style of masculine presenting women, gender nonconformists and trans* identified individuals, offering an alternative narrative to the museum's current "Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe" exhibition. Historically the fashion world has been extremely queer friendly -- what role do you think the fashion world has played within mainstream acceptance of LGBT identity? Fashion has accustomed people to gender bending. We are more open to human expression rather than binaries. People are starting to let go of being uncomfortable about other people being different. Gender is often best expressed in presentation, how you wear your clothes and the swag you have when you feel good about your look. Fashion communicates identity with options. You should also see: http://gracehoward.myblogs.jp/2014/12/13/model-citizen-naomi-campbell-finds-happiness/ http://charlottea.tarlog.com/post/2/
    703 Posted by Demi Mahmood
  • 19 Dec 2014
    PK Designers Lounge, known to desis in the United States as PKDL, is a multi-brand designer studio boasting racks of outfits by Pakistani designers. Co-owned by Rafia Shah and Samrah Qadri, the one-stop-shop to a gamut of Pakistani designer wear is based in Washington DC but serves clientele all across the US and Canada. It’s been over two years since they came into business. “It started out as a hobby for both of us. We both love fashion and we realised there is a market in US that loved fashion as much as we do and want to wear trendy and latest designer clothes,” Shah told The Express Tribune. Born and bred in Pakistan, settled in the states after getting married and headed on to make an entrepreneurship out of a leisure pursuit. “Soon after we opened PKDL, we started getting requests from Pakistani women all across the US to provide them with desi designer wear. We realised we could cater to a much larger clientele if we took our brand to other states too. We started with road shows and in just a little over two years, we travelled to almost all major states that had a heavy Pakistani population,” said Qadri. kissydress.co.uk Elaborating on the launch of the enterprise, Shah says, “The idea behind PKDL was not only to provide a platform to Pakistani designers to showcase their line of work in the US but also give an opportunity to Pakistani fashion followers to have easy access to these brands. People can always buy clothes online or have their relatives mail them joras but we wanted to create an experience for our clients.” With over 20 designers to choose from, PKDL is the largest Pakistani designer collection in North America. Its stocks include popular brands like Elan, HSY, Asifa & Nabeel, Faraz Manan, Nickie Nina, Mina Hasan, Zara Shahjahan, Sania Maskatiya, Farida Hasan and Ayesha F. Hashwani among others. The entrepreneurs also showcased their designer collections in 2012 in England for an exhibit especially organised for them by the High Commission of Pakistan in London. Vending collections from a cluster of brands, they speak about the sought after designers from Pakistan, “There are so many designers these days doing amazing work. The craftsmanship from Pakistan is outstanding. It’s just about quality control. I would say Faraz Manan, Zara Shahjahan, Sania Maskatiya, Ayesha Farook Hashwani and Mina Hasan make amazing sales. Our top selling brand though is Elan. It is often sold out the same day it hits the rack,” Shah commented. Adding new designers periodically to broaden the spectrum of brands for buyers to peruse from, they are fussy about the brands they select: “We have to be very picky. We choose the designers that will do well in our targeted market. We are excited to announce that the luxury brand Muse will be stocking at PKDL starting January 2015,” confirmed Qadri. For the future, they have been planning out 2015 road shows with a wide range of exhibitions lined up in San Antonio, Kentucky, Wisconsin and San Francisco Bay Area. “We’re also looking forward to our third anniversary event in February 2015. It’ll be a fun occasion where people not only purchase their favourite designs but also socialise with fellow fashionistas. We have something life-size planned for the affair this year, “Qadri said. kissydress red prom dresses
    679 Posted by Demi Mahmood

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