Anna Preston 's Entries

17 blogs
  • 15 Aug 2019
    A live-in carer must undertake many different tasks as part of their job and one of these is helping to take care of an elderly patient’s pets. If you are thinking about homecare or live-in carer as a career it may surprise you to learn that one of your jobs will be to look after your patient’s pet. If you are a pet owner yourself or a keen animal lover then this won’t be too onerous a task but if you’ve never had to take care of an animal before what can you expect? You can find out more at the Live-in Care Hub (www.liveincarehub.co.uk) but in the meantime here are a few pointers.   Pets can be family members too Whether a budgie, fish, cat or dog, a pet is often a much loved and cherished part of the family and may have been with the family, or the person you are caring for, a long time. As such they deserve to be cared for with the same dedication that the owner would show as the presence of a loved and familiar pet can be of enormous comfort to its owner especially when everything appears to be changing in their life – such as their care.   The benefits that the companionship of an animal brings to elderly people in general is well documented and there are numerous care institutions which now allow visiting animals, often dogs but sometimes other creatures, to be brought into homes where older people can enjoy their company for a while. The sight of a dog snoozing at the feet of an elderly resident aids relaxation and calmness and can really help improve the quality of life of a person.   Owning a pet can be particularly beneficial for those with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. The familiarity of a feeding, grooming or walking routine can help to calm agitated minds and combat loneliness and depression. A friendly animal can also help a distressed person to engage in cases where they are unable to do so around people.   Get extra help where needed Most pets are exactly like humans in that they thrive on a regular routine, appropriate exercise and companionship. When you start to care for an elderly person make a good start by making friends with their pet wherever possible and ask about feeding, cleaning and exercise schedules. Any veterinary medications that are needed should be noted and administered correctly. Where a dog is involved it will need daily walks to maintain good health so walking time should be factored into your daily routine.   Sometimes though, with the best will in the world it can be difficult to give adequate time and attention to a pet if your elderly patient is especially demanding or has complex needs. In these cases you should reach out to others who can help, perhaps the patient’s family or friends. Or enquire in the local area about respite or temporary pet sitting or dog walking services; many pet sitters care for all different animals.
    203 Posted by Anna Preston
  • A live-in carer must undertake many different tasks as part of their job and one of these is helping to take care of an elderly patient’s pets. If you are thinking about homecare or live-in carer as a career it may surprise you to learn that one of your jobs will be to look after your patient’s pet. If you are a pet owner yourself or a keen animal lover then this won’t be too onerous a task but if you’ve never had to take care of an animal before what can you expect? You can find out more at the Live-in Care Hub (www.liveincarehub.co.uk) but in the meantime here are a few pointers.   Pets can be family members too Whether a budgie, fish, cat or dog, a pet is often a much loved and cherished part of the family and may have been with the family, or the person you are caring for, a long time. As such they deserve to be cared for with the same dedication that the owner would show as the presence of a loved and familiar pet can be of enormous comfort to its owner especially when everything appears to be changing in their life – such as their care.   The benefits that the companionship of an animal brings to elderly people in general is well documented and there are numerous care institutions which now allow visiting animals, often dogs but sometimes other creatures, to be brought into homes where older people can enjoy their company for a while. The sight of a dog snoozing at the feet of an elderly resident aids relaxation and calmness and can really help improve the quality of life of a person.   Owning a pet can be particularly beneficial for those with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. The familiarity of a feeding, grooming or walking routine can help to calm agitated minds and combat loneliness and depression. A friendly animal can also help a distressed person to engage in cases where they are unable to do so around people.   Get extra help where needed Most pets are exactly like humans in that they thrive on a regular routine, appropriate exercise and companionship. When you start to care for an elderly person make a good start by making friends with their pet wherever possible and ask about feeding, cleaning and exercise schedules. Any veterinary medications that are needed should be noted and administered correctly. Where a dog is involved it will need daily walks to maintain good health so walking time should be factored into your daily routine.   Sometimes though, with the best will in the world it can be difficult to give adequate time and attention to a pet if your elderly patient is especially demanding or has complex needs. In these cases you should reach out to others who can help, perhaps the patient’s family or friends. Or enquire in the local area about respite or temporary pet sitting or dog walking services; many pet sitters care for all different animals.
    Aug 15, 2019 203
  • 15 Aug 2019
    Dementia patients are prone to confusion and anxiety but by understanding their needs they can be made to feel more safe and secure.   Dementia is a blanket term that refers to a life-changing decline in mental ability. Alzheimer’s is the most common form – affecting 60-80% of patients, with Vascular Dementia, often caused by a stroke, the next most common variety.   Research by the Live In Care Hub shows that dementia is the most feared illness with 34% saying they fear suffering it in later life. The research, published in the “No Place Like Home” report, also revealed that 52% of people are happier to talk about the condition than they were 10 years ago.   The increased awareness and willingness to discuss dementia is good news for dementia sufferers as it encourages those caring for them to learn about their needs and provide a secure, safe and familiar environment.   Core Symptoms To be considered dementia, at least two of the following areas must be affected: Memory Communication and language Ability to focus and pay attention Reasoning and judgement Visual perception   Many patients become agitated and scared when difficulty remembering impacts on their daily life. For example, forgetting which drawer the spoons are in or walking into the bedroom instead of the bathroom. If their language skills are diminishing, they may have difficulty in making themselves understood and may find it hard to listen to and follow instructions if their attention span dwindles. Another area where those with dementia can struggle is with mobility, even around familiar areas, as problems with visual perception can make rugs look like holes and thresholds look like steps.   Familiar Surroundings Memory is strengthened by repetition so it is important to keep changes to the home environment to a minimum. It can help to label doors, drawers and cupboards with the contents to help the patient locate items with the minimum of fuss. It is for this reason that many dementia patients decline if they need to move to a care home – learning new surroundings and routines simply confuses their damaged brain and they find it hard to adapt. In so many ways they are better being cared for with in-home care or live-in care at home.   Careful alterations can support independence One change that is useful to make is to remove rugs and mats – even ones taped to the floor. As mentioned above, these can be seen as holes or steps and turn into trip hazards, thus increasing the risk of falls. Good lighting helps so ensure that curtains are opened and lights fitted with bright enough bulbs. Carpets are usually a better choice as the noise of walking across a hard floor can be disorientating to sufferers, and should contrast with the walls so the edges are clear.   Remembering who’s who It can be difficult for those with dementia to keep track of new faces. If in home care is required then the same carers should be requested so that the patient recognises them. Labelled photographs, together with times when the carer will be present, can be helpful. If the sufferer has live in carers then placing a photograph of the current carer in a prominent position will help avoid anxiety.              
    213 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Dementia patients are prone to confusion and anxiety but by understanding their needs they can be made to feel more safe and secure.   Dementia is a blanket term that refers to a life-changing decline in mental ability. Alzheimer’s is the most common form – affecting 60-80% of patients, with Vascular Dementia, often caused by a stroke, the next most common variety.   Research by the Live In Care Hub shows that dementia is the most feared illness with 34% saying they fear suffering it in later life. The research, published in the “No Place Like Home” report, also revealed that 52% of people are happier to talk about the condition than they were 10 years ago.   The increased awareness and willingness to discuss dementia is good news for dementia sufferers as it encourages those caring for them to learn about their needs and provide a secure, safe and familiar environment.   Core Symptoms To be considered dementia, at least two of the following areas must be affected: Memory Communication and language Ability to focus and pay attention Reasoning and judgement Visual perception   Many patients become agitated and scared when difficulty remembering impacts on their daily life. For example, forgetting which drawer the spoons are in or walking into the bedroom instead of the bathroom. If their language skills are diminishing, they may have difficulty in making themselves understood and may find it hard to listen to and follow instructions if their attention span dwindles. Another area where those with dementia can struggle is with mobility, even around familiar areas, as problems with visual perception can make rugs look like holes and thresholds look like steps.   Familiar Surroundings Memory is strengthened by repetition so it is important to keep changes to the home environment to a minimum. It can help to label doors, drawers and cupboards with the contents to help the patient locate items with the minimum of fuss. It is for this reason that many dementia patients decline if they need to move to a care home – learning new surroundings and routines simply confuses their damaged brain and they find it hard to adapt. In so many ways they are better being cared for with in-home care or live-in care at home.   Careful alterations can support independence One change that is useful to make is to remove rugs and mats – even ones taped to the floor. As mentioned above, these can be seen as holes or steps and turn into trip hazards, thus increasing the risk of falls. Good lighting helps so ensure that curtains are opened and lights fitted with bright enough bulbs. Carpets are usually a better choice as the noise of walking across a hard floor can be disorientating to sufferers, and should contrast with the walls so the edges are clear.   Remembering who’s who It can be difficult for those with dementia to keep track of new faces. If in home care is required then the same carers should be requested so that the patient recognises them. Labelled photographs, together with times when the carer will be present, can be helpful. If the sufferer has live in carers then placing a photograph of the current carer in a prominent position will help avoid anxiety.              
    Aug 15, 2019 213
  • 15 Aug 2019
    It’s said that the joy of reading never leaves you. Getting stuck into a good book or favourite magazine is a wonderful way to pass the time whatever your age.   The joy of becoming totally immersed in a good read is something which often has its roots in childhood and most keen readers will tell you that reading is something which is invaluable as a tool for relieving stress or simply for passing a few hours. According to the Live-in Care Hub many older people find their days significantly enhanced when they have access to reading materials.   Indeed, according to their No Place like Home report many carers, whether they are providing live-in care 24/7 or regular home care services during the day, have confirmed that elderly people are happiest when they have familiar things like their favourite books around them. When your senior relative has a bookshelf groaning with books it can be difficult wondering what book to get for them that they haven’t already read. Here are some suggestions.   Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen This award-winning book, recommended for elderly people by Goodreads, tells the story of love between two people from different worlds.   The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway This is about an old fisherman and his battle for survival against rough seas. It’s a fairly simple and short but absorbing tale.   Nana in the City by Lauren Castillo This would be a lovely story to read to the grandkids as well as being one that can whisk you away to a world of a young boy, his grandmother and a magic cape.   Making the Rounds with Oscar by David Dosa An extraordinary true story of the cat who knew when people at the end of their lives needed the comfort he could provide. Heart-warming and inspiring.   The Little Lady Who Broke All The Rules by Catharina Ingelman-Sundberg A 79 year old woman dreams of escaping her humdrum life and robbing a bank. She and four friends decide to rebel against the ordinary and go on to have fun adventures.   Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson Set in a traditional English village this book explores the local characters, their travails and foibles.   One Man’s Wilderness: An Alaskan Odyssey by Richard Proenneke An inspiring read for those with an adventurous streak.   These are just a few general suggestions of course but you can also consider books relating to hobbies and interests whether that be gardening, wildlife, caravans, motorcycles or crafts. The choice is endless.   Audiobooks and E-Readers   For people who are blind or partially-sighted or who have difficulty in concentrating audiobooks or podcasts are a godsend. Simply download some onto an easily accessible device which they or their carer can operate. The RNIB have a large collection of talking books for the blind.   An e-reader like the Amazon Kindle Paperwhite is a great option as it has options to set font size for easier reading and the screen is glare-free even in bright sunlight. Downloading books is simple to do and the device is very user-friendly.    With all these options, both for books to try and for devices to read them on, there’s really no reason your elderly relative or friend shouldn’t be able to enjoy reading, wherever they may be!
    240 Posted by Anna Preston
  • It’s said that the joy of reading never leaves you. Getting stuck into a good book or favourite magazine is a wonderful way to pass the time whatever your age.   The joy of becoming totally immersed in a good read is something which often has its roots in childhood and most keen readers will tell you that reading is something which is invaluable as a tool for relieving stress or simply for passing a few hours. According to the Live-in Care Hub many older people find their days significantly enhanced when they have access to reading materials.   Indeed, according to their No Place like Home report many carers, whether they are providing live-in care 24/7 or regular home care services during the day, have confirmed that elderly people are happiest when they have familiar things like their favourite books around them. When your senior relative has a bookshelf groaning with books it can be difficult wondering what book to get for them that they haven’t already read. Here are some suggestions.   Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen This award-winning book, recommended for elderly people by Goodreads, tells the story of love between two people from different worlds.   The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway This is about an old fisherman and his battle for survival against rough seas. It’s a fairly simple and short but absorbing tale.   Nana in the City by Lauren Castillo This would be a lovely story to read to the grandkids as well as being one that can whisk you away to a world of a young boy, his grandmother and a magic cape.   Making the Rounds with Oscar by David Dosa An extraordinary true story of the cat who knew when people at the end of their lives needed the comfort he could provide. Heart-warming and inspiring.   The Little Lady Who Broke All The Rules by Catharina Ingelman-Sundberg A 79 year old woman dreams of escaping her humdrum life and robbing a bank. She and four friends decide to rebel against the ordinary and go on to have fun adventures.   Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson Set in a traditional English village this book explores the local characters, their travails and foibles.   One Man’s Wilderness: An Alaskan Odyssey by Richard Proenneke An inspiring read for those with an adventurous streak.   These are just a few general suggestions of course but you can also consider books relating to hobbies and interests whether that be gardening, wildlife, caravans, motorcycles or crafts. The choice is endless.   Audiobooks and E-Readers   For people who are blind or partially-sighted or who have difficulty in concentrating audiobooks or podcasts are a godsend. Simply download some onto an easily accessible device which they or their carer can operate. The RNIB have a large collection of talking books for the blind.   An e-reader like the Amazon Kindle Paperwhite is a great option as it has options to set font size for easier reading and the screen is glare-free even in bright sunlight. Downloading books is simple to do and the device is very user-friendly.    With all these options, both for books to try and for devices to read them on, there’s really no reason your elderly relative or friend shouldn’t be able to enjoy reading, wherever they may be!
    Aug 15, 2019 240
  • 15 Aug 2019
    Thinking of becoming a live-in carer? If you aren’t sure if it’s the right job for you then perhaps these unexpected benefits will change your mind. There are many reasons why someone chooses to become a live-in carer. Perhaps you’ve cared for an elderly relative and wish to continue caring for others once they’ve passed away or moved into residential care. Perhaps you’ve worked in a care home and now want a change of job to something that offers a bit more flexibility. Or perhaps it’s all new to you and you just like the idea of making someone’s twilight years just that little bit more comfortable, whether it’s by providing regular home care or actually living with the person needing care.   A rising elderly population means you’ll never be out of a job Perhaps unsurprisingly, research by the Live in Care Hub, published in their “No Place Like Home” report, found that an overwhelming majority of people would prefer to remain in their own home, with a carer if necessary, rather than move into residential care. This, coupled with rising numbers of older people, means there is likely to be high demand for live-in care at home in the future meaning you can be pretty sure you won’t be out of a job any time soon.   You may reduce your living costs considerably There are many different shift patterns for live-in carers to reflect the differing needs of their clients. Some carers choose to offer a level of care that allows them to make their clients home their own. This allows them to reduce their living costs by avoiding the need to own or rent accommodation for nights that they spend away from the home.   Even carers who work with a client who needs more constant care, and therefore change shift on a regular basis, can keep the running costs of their own home low as it requires less heating and cleaning whilst not in use. Some enterprising carers even rent their own dwelling for short-term lets when they are not using it!   You won’t be lonely Many carers starting their first live-in care position worry that they will become lonely or isolated from their own friends and family. All carers are entitled to regular breaks in which some choose to use to leave the client’s house and meet with friends for coffee or to attend meetings of clubs and activities.   Plus, there’s always your client to talk to. Part of the role of live-in carer is to provide companionship and many old people are always ready to chat about the weather, their family, what’s on TV or reminisce about their past. And unlike the majority of care homes live-in care enables clients to remain with their pets, so if you like animals you may well find yourself caring for a dog, cat, goldfish – even a pony or llama – as well as your client. In fact, many live-in carers are “empty nesters” who are looking for a career to fill the gap where raising a family once sat and find live-in care to provide them with the ideal combination of a caring role, company and career.
    178 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Thinking of becoming a live-in carer? If you aren’t sure if it’s the right job for you then perhaps these unexpected benefits will change your mind. There are many reasons why someone chooses to become a live-in carer. Perhaps you’ve cared for an elderly relative and wish to continue caring for others once they’ve passed away or moved into residential care. Perhaps you’ve worked in a care home and now want a change of job to something that offers a bit more flexibility. Or perhaps it’s all new to you and you just like the idea of making someone’s twilight years just that little bit more comfortable, whether it’s by providing regular home care or actually living with the person needing care.   A rising elderly population means you’ll never be out of a job Perhaps unsurprisingly, research by the Live in Care Hub, published in their “No Place Like Home” report, found that an overwhelming majority of people would prefer to remain in their own home, with a carer if necessary, rather than move into residential care. This, coupled with rising numbers of older people, means there is likely to be high demand for live-in care at home in the future meaning you can be pretty sure you won’t be out of a job any time soon.   You may reduce your living costs considerably There are many different shift patterns for live-in carers to reflect the differing needs of their clients. Some carers choose to offer a level of care that allows them to make their clients home their own. This allows them to reduce their living costs by avoiding the need to own or rent accommodation for nights that they spend away from the home.   Even carers who work with a client who needs more constant care, and therefore change shift on a regular basis, can keep the running costs of their own home low as it requires less heating and cleaning whilst not in use. Some enterprising carers even rent their own dwelling for short-term lets when they are not using it!   You won’t be lonely Many carers starting their first live-in care position worry that they will become lonely or isolated from their own friends and family. All carers are entitled to regular breaks in which some choose to use to leave the client’s house and meet with friends for coffee or to attend meetings of clubs and activities.   Plus, there’s always your client to talk to. Part of the role of live-in carer is to provide companionship and many old people are always ready to chat about the weather, their family, what’s on TV or reminisce about their past. And unlike the majority of care homes live-in care enables clients to remain with their pets, so if you like animals you may well find yourself caring for a dog, cat, goldfish – even a pony or llama – as well as your client. In fact, many live-in carers are “empty nesters” who are looking for a career to fill the gap where raising a family once sat and find live-in care to provide them with the ideal combination of a caring role, company and career.
    Aug 15, 2019 178
  • 13 Aug 2019
    Information, resources and tips to help you care for yourself whilst caring for an elderly relative, which can be very challenging.   Statistics tell us that within the UK, 1 in 5 people aged between 50 and 64 are carers  and around 65% of older carers (aged between 60 and 94) have long-term health issues themselves on top of caring. The same studies also revealed that nearly 70% of older carers say that their caring position causes them to have problems with their mental health. Not all older carers are caring for their parents and could be caring for their children, partner or friend. However, many older carers are caring for their parents, or one of their parents, which can have many unique challenges including:   Struggling with the role reversal with your parent Handling the various moods and emotions of a parent who requires care (they may feel bitter, embarrassed or resentful) Handling the physical and emotional behaviour of a parent with dementia Missing a parent who is no longer 'themselves' because of dementia Dealing with the responsibility of keeping a parent safe and in good health Coping with the physical challenges of caring Balancing family life and a career with your caring role Struggling with your own emotions of resentment, anger, bitterness, sadness and more   These are just some of the challenges that can arise when you care for a parent. When caring for your Mother, there may be particular challenges that come from your position. Your Mother may have been the one you always turn to for advice, the one you always admired for her strength and togetherness, the one who always looked out for you. It can be so hard to handle the change, particularly when the bond with your Mother is strained whilst you need to provide adequate care to ensure her wellbeing.   How To Cope With Caring For An Elderly Mother   To care for your Mother well, you must put yourself first. Unfortunately that is not always the main priority of caregivers. In fact, most caregivers struggle to put themselves first, which can result in caregiver burnout eventually. Caregiver burnout is where a person is physically and emotionally exhausted from caring and they are then unable to provide care to themselves or their loved one whilst trying to recover from the breakdown. It can take years to get over a breakdown, so it is important to try and avoid it. Can you include any of the following in your life to help you cope with your caregiver position?   Hobbies that are just for you Exercise A healthy diet Abstinence from bad habits that you lean on to cope Regular chats and support from your GP, friends, family and neighbours Any activities that help you stay in touch with your own worth and identity   The more healthy and balanced your life is and the more emotional support you allow yourself to take, the better.   Is It Time To Consider Respite Care? If you are doing everything you can to cope with caring for your elderly Mother but you know you need a little more support, perhaps it is time to consider respite care. Home care agencies can provide home care to your loved one as a one off, once a week, for a set time everyday, or for holiday cover. Professional carers will come to your home and care for your loved one, allowing you the time to relax, run errands, spend time with friends and family, or simply to get outdoors and get some time away from the home. If you think you might need more support long-term, you could speak to home care agencies about long-term at home care where the carer lives in your home and cares for your loved one. This is a great alternative to residential care and means your loved one remains at home with you, but you are able to relieve some or all of your caregiver duties.   It can be hard to swallow your pride and recognise that you can't do it all, all the time. To enquire about home care services or respite care, speak to some local care agencies. Also speak to your doctor about getting a care assessment for your Mother and take a look at The Live-in Care Hub for more information about live-in care. Your Mother deserves to be happy and healthy, and so do you. Reaching out for help is a really important step to take if you need some support with your caregiving role.
    219 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Information, resources and tips to help you care for yourself whilst caring for an elderly relative, which can be very challenging.   Statistics tell us that within the UK, 1 in 5 people aged between 50 and 64 are carers  and around 65% of older carers (aged between 60 and 94) have long-term health issues themselves on top of caring. The same studies also revealed that nearly 70% of older carers say that their caring position causes them to have problems with their mental health. Not all older carers are caring for their parents and could be caring for their children, partner or friend. However, many older carers are caring for their parents, or one of their parents, which can have many unique challenges including:   Struggling with the role reversal with your parent Handling the various moods and emotions of a parent who requires care (they may feel bitter, embarrassed or resentful) Handling the physical and emotional behaviour of a parent with dementia Missing a parent who is no longer 'themselves' because of dementia Dealing with the responsibility of keeping a parent safe and in good health Coping with the physical challenges of caring Balancing family life and a career with your caring role Struggling with your own emotions of resentment, anger, bitterness, sadness and more   These are just some of the challenges that can arise when you care for a parent. When caring for your Mother, there may be particular challenges that come from your position. Your Mother may have been the one you always turn to for advice, the one you always admired for her strength and togetherness, the one who always looked out for you. It can be so hard to handle the change, particularly when the bond with your Mother is strained whilst you need to provide adequate care to ensure her wellbeing.   How To Cope With Caring For An Elderly Mother   To care for your Mother well, you must put yourself first. Unfortunately that is not always the main priority of caregivers. In fact, most caregivers struggle to put themselves first, which can result in caregiver burnout eventually. Caregiver burnout is where a person is physically and emotionally exhausted from caring and they are then unable to provide care to themselves or their loved one whilst trying to recover from the breakdown. It can take years to get over a breakdown, so it is important to try and avoid it. Can you include any of the following in your life to help you cope with your caregiver position?   Hobbies that are just for you Exercise A healthy diet Abstinence from bad habits that you lean on to cope Regular chats and support from your GP, friends, family and neighbours Any activities that help you stay in touch with your own worth and identity   The more healthy and balanced your life is and the more emotional support you allow yourself to take, the better.   Is It Time To Consider Respite Care? If you are doing everything you can to cope with caring for your elderly Mother but you know you need a little more support, perhaps it is time to consider respite care. Home care agencies can provide home care to your loved one as a one off, once a week, for a set time everyday, or for holiday cover. Professional carers will come to your home and care for your loved one, allowing you the time to relax, run errands, spend time with friends and family, or simply to get outdoors and get some time away from the home. If you think you might need more support long-term, you could speak to home care agencies about long-term at home care where the carer lives in your home and cares for your loved one. This is a great alternative to residential care and means your loved one remains at home with you, but you are able to relieve some or all of your caregiver duties.   It can be hard to swallow your pride and recognise that you can't do it all, all the time. To enquire about home care services or respite care, speak to some local care agencies. Also speak to your doctor about getting a care assessment for your Mother and take a look at The Live-in Care Hub for more information about live-in care. Your Mother deserves to be happy and healthy, and so do you. Reaching out for help is a really important step to take if you need some support with your caregiving role.
    Aug 13, 2019 219
  • 13 Aug 2019
    Find out about the nutritional needs you may have as somebody with less mobility and how to achieve new nutritional goals for optimum health.   Making and preparing meals when you have issues with arthritis or other mobility problems can be very challenging. The simple act of slicing a cucumber, opening a jar or even just making some toast can be very difficult and as a result your nutrition can suffer. 1 million adults aged 65 or over in the UK are malnourished or at risk of malnourishment and many of those people may struggle because of issues with mobility. Adversely, the right nutrition is very important for anyone but particularly those who are less mobile. As we age our nutritional needs change and a big challenge can be getting the right nutrients on fewer calories and ensuring we don't consume too many calories. If you are less mobile the already present challenge of nutrition becomes even more challenging. Here are some tips to help you maintain your nutrition if you are less mobile:   Count Your Calories If you move less you require fewer calories. It is important for you to count your calories and ensure you are getting the right nutrition from the smaller amount of food you are consuming. It can be challenging to do this but so important as weight gain is only going to cause further issues with mobility and increase your risk of obesity related diseases like Type 2 Diabetes.   Consider Some Help At Home The Live-in Care Hub completed a study that found that most people would prefer to avoid residential care if they are unwell or unable to care for themselves and residential care might not even be appropriate for you if you simply need some help with basic tasks. The same study showed that somebody who has live-in care is much more likely to enjoy the food and drink they want, than someone within residential care. Home care services can be really useful to help with shopping and cooking nutritious meals for you. Home care services can also help maximise your mobility and help you stay as independent as possible.   Pack In The Protein For the elderly and those who are less mobile protein is so important. When you don't get enough protein in your diet you lose body fat, lean mass and muscle and you can't maintain the strength you currently have let alone build more strength. So, you could even be limiting your ability to improve mobility just by not eating enough protein. Some great protein sources  are eggs, lean meat and legumes.   Maintain Good Bone Health Falls can be really tricky injuries to recover from as you age, so it is important to keep your bones as strong as possible with exercise and diet. Although calcium is important when it comes to your bone health, a good variety of fruits and vegetables is also important.     It is important that you seek specific advice for good nutrition to ensure that your health and vitality is optimum as you age. With changing nutritional needs as we get older some simple tweeks can make a huge difference. The right diet changes and support could even boost your mobility, if not maintain it along with good levels of health, for an active and healthy later life.
    363 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Find out about the nutritional needs you may have as somebody with less mobility and how to achieve new nutritional goals for optimum health.   Making and preparing meals when you have issues with arthritis or other mobility problems can be very challenging. The simple act of slicing a cucumber, opening a jar or even just making some toast can be very difficult and as a result your nutrition can suffer. 1 million adults aged 65 or over in the UK are malnourished or at risk of malnourishment and many of those people may struggle because of issues with mobility. Adversely, the right nutrition is very important for anyone but particularly those who are less mobile. As we age our nutritional needs change and a big challenge can be getting the right nutrients on fewer calories and ensuring we don't consume too many calories. If you are less mobile the already present challenge of nutrition becomes even more challenging. Here are some tips to help you maintain your nutrition if you are less mobile:   Count Your Calories If you move less you require fewer calories. It is important for you to count your calories and ensure you are getting the right nutrition from the smaller amount of food you are consuming. It can be challenging to do this but so important as weight gain is only going to cause further issues with mobility and increase your risk of obesity related diseases like Type 2 Diabetes.   Consider Some Help At Home The Live-in Care Hub completed a study that found that most people would prefer to avoid residential care if they are unwell or unable to care for themselves and residential care might not even be appropriate for you if you simply need some help with basic tasks. The same study showed that somebody who has live-in care is much more likely to enjoy the food and drink they want, than someone within residential care. Home care services can be really useful to help with shopping and cooking nutritious meals for you. Home care services can also help maximise your mobility and help you stay as independent as possible.   Pack In The Protein For the elderly and those who are less mobile protein is so important. When you don't get enough protein in your diet you lose body fat, lean mass and muscle and you can't maintain the strength you currently have let alone build more strength. So, you could even be limiting your ability to improve mobility just by not eating enough protein. Some great protein sources  are eggs, lean meat and legumes.   Maintain Good Bone Health Falls can be really tricky injuries to recover from as you age, so it is important to keep your bones as strong as possible with exercise and diet. Although calcium is important when it comes to your bone health, a good variety of fruits and vegetables is also important.     It is important that you seek specific advice for good nutrition to ensure that your health and vitality is optimum as you age. With changing nutritional needs as we get older some simple tweeks can make a huge difference. The right diet changes and support could even boost your mobility, if not maintain it along with good levels of health, for an active and healthy later life.
    Aug 13, 2019 363
  • 13 Aug 2019
    Read about how to ensure your mind stays healthy and clear as you age, with great tips, tricks and information to support your mind through the years.   As we age, our physical and mental health naturally declines. However, this can be preventable or at the very least we can slow it down with a little extra effort with our lifestyle. It is so important to put the plans in place to retain the best possible health, so that later life can be as vibrant and rewarding as possible. With your mind in particular, it is naturally going to degrade to some level as you get older, and certain aspects of getting older make your brain more likely to decline, so you have to pay extra care and attention to your brain health to ensure it stays in tip top condition for the best possible brain health in your golden years. Here are X ways to keep your mind healthy in later life:   Decrease The Things That Make You Unhappy In a study completed in Boston with people over the age of 65 with amazing memories it was found that part of the success of their incredible memories was taking the steps to reduce or remove things they didn't like in their life, as early as middle age. Jobs they hated, taking more holidays, doing more activities that made them happy all contributed to preventing brain health decline as they aged. So, now is the time to reduce the things in your life that don't make you feel great, and replace them with the happiest activities, for the good of your brain health.   Maintain Your Sense Of Purpose Something that is often lost when people move into care homes, or when they age in general, is that they lose their sense of purpose. This can lead to depression which is really bad for brain health. Whether you have a gardening project, you volunteer at a local charity shop or you have a role in your local social group, maintaining your sense of purpose will help keep your brain young.   Stay Social Staying social is so important when it comes to the health of your brain. Being lonely is known to be as bad for you as smoking, so the more you can stay in touch with others the better for your brain. In fact, contact with children improves mental health in the elderly. If you struggle to stay mobile and find that is a hindrance to your social life, it might be worth looking into homecare services. Live-in care provides excellent support and companionship helping maintain your independence.   Stay Active Exercise boosts blood flow and oxygen to the brain so it is important to stay active in later life to maintain your brain health.   Eat Well Nutritional needs change as you get older so eating well is essential, for a wide variety of reasons including maintaining your brain health. Eat a balanced diet with plenty of vitamins, minerals and nutrients to ensure you stay sharp in later life.   If you need some help maintaining your health and wellbeing, it is important to seek help. Speak to your GP, to your homecare services provider or live-in care provider, to your social services agent or to friends and family to look into getting some support. Your brain health, and overall well being can thrive with the right routine, activities and support in place.            
    226 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Read about how to ensure your mind stays healthy and clear as you age, with great tips, tricks and information to support your mind through the years.   As we age, our physical and mental health naturally declines. However, this can be preventable or at the very least we can slow it down with a little extra effort with our lifestyle. It is so important to put the plans in place to retain the best possible health, so that later life can be as vibrant and rewarding as possible. With your mind in particular, it is naturally going to degrade to some level as you get older, and certain aspects of getting older make your brain more likely to decline, so you have to pay extra care and attention to your brain health to ensure it stays in tip top condition for the best possible brain health in your golden years. Here are X ways to keep your mind healthy in later life:   Decrease The Things That Make You Unhappy In a study completed in Boston with people over the age of 65 with amazing memories it was found that part of the success of their incredible memories was taking the steps to reduce or remove things they didn't like in their life, as early as middle age. Jobs they hated, taking more holidays, doing more activities that made them happy all contributed to preventing brain health decline as they aged. So, now is the time to reduce the things in your life that don't make you feel great, and replace them with the happiest activities, for the good of your brain health.   Maintain Your Sense Of Purpose Something that is often lost when people move into care homes, or when they age in general, is that they lose their sense of purpose. This can lead to depression which is really bad for brain health. Whether you have a gardening project, you volunteer at a local charity shop or you have a role in your local social group, maintaining your sense of purpose will help keep your brain young.   Stay Social Staying social is so important when it comes to the health of your brain. Being lonely is known to be as bad for you as smoking, so the more you can stay in touch with others the better for your brain. In fact, contact with children improves mental health in the elderly. If you struggle to stay mobile and find that is a hindrance to your social life, it might be worth looking into homecare services. Live-in care provides excellent support and companionship helping maintain your independence.   Stay Active Exercise boosts blood flow and oxygen to the brain so it is important to stay active in later life to maintain your brain health.   Eat Well Nutritional needs change as you get older so eating well is essential, for a wide variety of reasons including maintaining your brain health. Eat a balanced diet with plenty of vitamins, minerals and nutrients to ensure you stay sharp in later life.   If you need some help maintaining your health and wellbeing, it is important to seek help. Speak to your GP, to your homecare services provider or live-in care provider, to your social services agent or to friends and family to look into getting some support. Your brain health, and overall well being can thrive with the right routine, activities and support in place.            
    Aug 13, 2019 226
  • 13 Aug 2019
    Find out about key challenges of elderly care in both live-in and residential settings, as well as common advantages and benefits to this kind of job.   There are currently over 11.8 million people in the UK aged over 65 which means there are lots of jobs constantly being created within the care industry. Working within care can be extremely rewarding, enabling you to work within a profession that truly makes a difference to others. The right senior care really makes a difference to people’s lives.   However, working with the elderly doesn't come without its challenges, including many that don't crop up in other jobs. If you are considering carer jobs or care home jobs, it is important to think about the challenges you might face in this industry so you can be as prepared as possible.   Here are some common challenges of caring for the elderly:   Your Client Might Not Ask For Help It is extremely common for carers to work with clients who do not ask for help. They may not think they need any, they might think it undermines their independence, they might be too proud. Being gentle, understanding and willing to always try but never force is important. In the case of safety though, you have to tactfully step in.   It Is Physically Demanding It is physically demanding to work within care. At the very least you are likely to be on your feet all day and at most you will be lifting and moving your clients as part of the job. The physical demands of caring are quite challenging so it is important to be physically fit within this type of job.   Your Client Might Not Recognise You Dementia comes with some huge challenges for carers, including the fact your client might not recognise you. They may also not understand your intention to help them and to keep them safe. This can be very tricky to navigate when you're a carer, but with some specialist training and a lot of patience and kindness, there's always a way to maintain your clients wellbeing and happiness. With research showing that people with dementia find live-in care better than a care home a role as a live-in carer can be particularly rewarding.   Particularly Sensitive Situations As a carer you might need to help somebody use the toilet, to help clean them after they go to the toilet. You may be helping them have a bath or shower, to help them dress. This can be a hurdle to get used to at the beginning of your career. A sensitive and compassionate approach to this kind of care is a must.   Letting Go Like any caring person, you will likely get attached to at least some of your clients. This is normal and can be a lovely part of the job, but it doesn't come without its heartbreak. As their health declines, as they get more dementia symptoms or pass away you may find it very tough.   If you are interested in live-in carer jobs, or care home jobs then it is important to understand the challenges involved in this kind of career. You can find out more at The Live-in Care Hub (www.liveincarehub.co.uk) or contact a live-in care agency or local care home for more information. It can take time to get used to some of the difficulties associated with caring for the elderly and infirm, and even the most experienced carers still need support and training with certain aspects of the job. All of that aside, the job is still very rewarding and offers some fantastic benefits.      
    200 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Find out about key challenges of elderly care in both live-in and residential settings, as well as common advantages and benefits to this kind of job.   There are currently over 11.8 million people in the UK aged over 65 which means there are lots of jobs constantly being created within the care industry. Working within care can be extremely rewarding, enabling you to work within a profession that truly makes a difference to others. The right senior care really makes a difference to people’s lives.   However, working with the elderly doesn't come without its challenges, including many that don't crop up in other jobs. If you are considering carer jobs or care home jobs, it is important to think about the challenges you might face in this industry so you can be as prepared as possible.   Here are some common challenges of caring for the elderly:   Your Client Might Not Ask For Help It is extremely common for carers to work with clients who do not ask for help. They may not think they need any, they might think it undermines their independence, they might be too proud. Being gentle, understanding and willing to always try but never force is important. In the case of safety though, you have to tactfully step in.   It Is Physically Demanding It is physically demanding to work within care. At the very least you are likely to be on your feet all day and at most you will be lifting and moving your clients as part of the job. The physical demands of caring are quite challenging so it is important to be physically fit within this type of job.   Your Client Might Not Recognise You Dementia comes with some huge challenges for carers, including the fact your client might not recognise you. They may also not understand your intention to help them and to keep them safe. This can be very tricky to navigate when you're a carer, but with some specialist training and a lot of patience and kindness, there's always a way to maintain your clients wellbeing and happiness. With research showing that people with dementia find live-in care better than a care home a role as a live-in carer can be particularly rewarding.   Particularly Sensitive Situations As a carer you might need to help somebody use the toilet, to help clean them after they go to the toilet. You may be helping them have a bath or shower, to help them dress. This can be a hurdle to get used to at the beginning of your career. A sensitive and compassionate approach to this kind of care is a must.   Letting Go Like any caring person, you will likely get attached to at least some of your clients. This is normal and can be a lovely part of the job, but it doesn't come without its heartbreak. As their health declines, as they get more dementia symptoms or pass away you may find it very tough.   If you are interested in live-in carer jobs, or care home jobs then it is important to understand the challenges involved in this kind of career. You can find out more at The Live-in Care Hub (www.liveincarehub.co.uk) or contact a live-in care agency or local care home for more information. It can take time to get used to some of the difficulties associated with caring for the elderly and infirm, and even the most experienced carers still need support and training with certain aspects of the job. All of that aside, the job is still very rewarding and offers some fantastic benefits.      
    Aug 13, 2019 200
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Find out about an amazing care role you can do that provides great personal benefits, whilst enabling an elderly person to remain in their own home.   Are you looking for the kind of career that makes you feel like you have made a difference in the world? Are you looking for a job that is as challenging as it is rewarding? Would you love to work in the kind of job that enables you to apply your training properly without time constraints or budget issues?   Perhaps it is time to start looking into live-in care.   A live-in carer provides elderly care in the clients home. The level of care provided depends on the support that the client needs. In one job you may be providing basic care and companionship, helping with person tasks and otherwise being on hand for support. In another job you could be accompanying your client whilst they go on holiday, and otherwise provide them with help with personal tasks, gardening, cooking and cleaning. Jobs may be long-term or short-term and you can provide live-in care as part of a rota with another carer (2 weeks on 2 weeks off).   The Benefits For The Client There are many benefits to a client having live-in care. The primary benefit is that they get to live in their own home, rather than moving to a residential home. 97% of people would rather not go into residential care if they become unwell or unable to care for themselves. Receiving care at home means they can stay in the place they love the most. Other benefits include: Companionship - 1.9 million older people in the UK feel ignored or invisible. Having a live-in carer helps to combat loneliness by providing immediate company and supporting mobility and independence. Nutrition and help with cooking Physiotherapy if needed Specialist care for stroke recovery or dementia Safety in the home Peace of mind for the family of the client Being able to stay with a partner Being able to keep a pet   There are many more benefits, and often ones that surprise you with every new client who has their own individual needs for live-in care.   The Benefits For You Being a live-in care is incredibly rewarding and you are making a huge difference to your clients life by supporting them at home. Other benefits of being a live-in carer include:   Saving money on household bills whilst you live in the home of your client Free and frequent training from your live-in care agency Often there is no need for qualifications to get the job (you won't be placed until you have been trained) Great pay The opportunity to travel (in some jobs) A good opportunity to apply the skills you have been taught without time restrictions or budget restrictions   There are many more benefits to being a live-in carer, many of which you find out for yourself during your placements. How To Get A Job In Live-in Care Do some research and have a look at the pay, the type of tasks you will need to do, and the type of person you need to be to be great at this kind of job. Not just anyone can be a carer, you have to be very special and very compassionate, with a real need to make a difference in a person's life. If you are already a carer in a residential home, then moving into live-in care could be an amazing next step for you. Take a look at live-in care and how it could benefit you and those you work with. It could be the best career decision you ever make.
    318 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Find out about an amazing care role you can do that provides great personal benefits, whilst enabling an elderly person to remain in their own home.   Are you looking for the kind of career that makes you feel like you have made a difference in the world? Are you looking for a job that is as challenging as it is rewarding? Would you love to work in the kind of job that enables you to apply your training properly without time constraints or budget issues?   Perhaps it is time to start looking into live-in care.   A live-in carer provides elderly care in the clients home. The level of care provided depends on the support that the client needs. In one job you may be providing basic care and companionship, helping with person tasks and otherwise being on hand for support. In another job you could be accompanying your client whilst they go on holiday, and otherwise provide them with help with personal tasks, gardening, cooking and cleaning. Jobs may be long-term or short-term and you can provide live-in care as part of a rota with another carer (2 weeks on 2 weeks off).   The Benefits For The Client There are many benefits to a client having live-in care. The primary benefit is that they get to live in their own home, rather than moving to a residential home. 97% of people would rather not go into residential care if they become unwell or unable to care for themselves. Receiving care at home means they can stay in the place they love the most. Other benefits include: Companionship - 1.9 million older people in the UK feel ignored or invisible. Having a live-in carer helps to combat loneliness by providing immediate company and supporting mobility and independence. Nutrition and help with cooking Physiotherapy if needed Specialist care for stroke recovery or dementia Safety in the home Peace of mind for the family of the client Being able to stay with a partner Being able to keep a pet   There are many more benefits, and often ones that surprise you with every new client who has their own individual needs for live-in care.   The Benefits For You Being a live-in care is incredibly rewarding and you are making a huge difference to your clients life by supporting them at home. Other benefits of being a live-in carer include:   Saving money on household bills whilst you live in the home of your client Free and frequent training from your live-in care agency Often there is no need for qualifications to get the job (you won't be placed until you have been trained) Great pay The opportunity to travel (in some jobs) A good opportunity to apply the skills you have been taught without time restrictions or budget restrictions   There are many more benefits to being a live-in carer, many of which you find out for yourself during your placements. How To Get A Job In Live-in Care Do some research and have a look at the pay, the type of tasks you will need to do, and the type of person you need to be to be great at this kind of job. Not just anyone can be a carer, you have to be very special and very compassionate, with a real need to make a difference in a person's life. If you are already a carer in a residential home, then moving into live-in care could be an amazing next step for you. Take a look at live-in care and how it could benefit you and those you work with. It could be the best career decision you ever make.
    Aug 06, 2019 318
  • 06 Aug 2019
    In this article we discuss what a carer does so you can see how your relative’s needs can be covered by care from a live-in carer.   Live in care covers a wide range of types of care and exactly what care a particular carer provides will be determined by the needs of their client. Initially the live in care provider will assess the client’s care needs, in conjunction with the family and relevant healthcare professionals, to create a care plan. This plan will detail what care you can expect.   You can find out more at the Live-in Care Hub about types of care offered as there isn’t enough room to go into detail in this article.   Dressing, hair and make-up or shaving A live-in carer can ensure that your relative is appropriately dressed and offer assistance as required, perhaps pulling on socks and shoes or doing up buttons and zips.   Support with personal care and continence If your relative struggles to bath or shower safely or is having issues with continence then a carer can help ensure that they maintain a high degree of personal hygiene. Managing and prompting medication Many older people have complex medication requirements and need help with remembering when to take medication. You can rest assured that your loved one is sticking to the schedule with some help from their carer. Mobility and personal safety Keeping active is important in later life and a live-in carer can help your relative to stay safe around the home, reducing the risk of falls or injuries.  They will also take over answering the door and phone to ensure your relative can’t be scammed or conned and doesn’t feel pressured to rush. Support overnight Live-in carers expect that they will be needed to take their client to the toilet or fetch drinks if they have difficulty getting out of bed, or in ensuring that your loved one doesn’t wander into danger if they become confused and disorientated. Planning, shopping and cooking balanced meals One of the first signs that a relative is struggling is if the find shopping difficult or forget to eat, something a carer will assist with. Light housework, laundry and ironing Running the household is something a live-in carer can help with. They can also assist with personal admin, correspondence and help with day-to-day finances as well as managing appointments, such as GP or hairdresser. Pet care One big benefit of a live-in carer is that your loved one doesn’t need to give up their pet. Trips out of the house A live-in carer can support your loved one to go shopping, attend appointments or go on days out. Many have their own car and are even able to drive your loved one to visit you! Companionship and emotional support It can get lonely if you can’t get out of the house much but a live-in carer can befriend your relative and keep them company. Their presence provides peace of mind for both clients and family members, while allowing your loved one to maintain their dignity and independence during their twilight years.    
    165 Posted by Anna Preston
  • In this article we discuss what a carer does so you can see how your relative’s needs can be covered by care from a live-in carer.   Live in care covers a wide range of types of care and exactly what care a particular carer provides will be determined by the needs of their client. Initially the live in care provider will assess the client’s care needs, in conjunction with the family and relevant healthcare professionals, to create a care plan. This plan will detail what care you can expect.   You can find out more at the Live-in Care Hub about types of care offered as there isn’t enough room to go into detail in this article.   Dressing, hair and make-up or shaving A live-in carer can ensure that your relative is appropriately dressed and offer assistance as required, perhaps pulling on socks and shoes or doing up buttons and zips.   Support with personal care and continence If your relative struggles to bath or shower safely or is having issues with continence then a carer can help ensure that they maintain a high degree of personal hygiene. Managing and prompting medication Many older people have complex medication requirements and need help with remembering when to take medication. You can rest assured that your loved one is sticking to the schedule with some help from their carer. Mobility and personal safety Keeping active is important in later life and a live-in carer can help your relative to stay safe around the home, reducing the risk of falls or injuries.  They will also take over answering the door and phone to ensure your relative can’t be scammed or conned and doesn’t feel pressured to rush. Support overnight Live-in carers expect that they will be needed to take their client to the toilet or fetch drinks if they have difficulty getting out of bed, or in ensuring that your loved one doesn’t wander into danger if they become confused and disorientated. Planning, shopping and cooking balanced meals One of the first signs that a relative is struggling is if the find shopping difficult or forget to eat, something a carer will assist with. Light housework, laundry and ironing Running the household is something a live-in carer can help with. They can also assist with personal admin, correspondence and help with day-to-day finances as well as managing appointments, such as GP or hairdresser. Pet care One big benefit of a live-in carer is that your loved one doesn’t need to give up their pet. Trips out of the house A live-in carer can support your loved one to go shopping, attend appointments or go on days out. Many have their own car and are even able to drive your loved one to visit you! Companionship and emotional support It can get lonely if you can’t get out of the house much but a live-in carer can befriend your relative and keep them company. Their presence provides peace of mind for both clients and family members, while allowing your loved one to maintain their dignity and independence during their twilight years.    
    Aug 06, 2019 165
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Checking on a live-in carer doesn’t need to be as frequent as checking on an elderly relative, but how do you know if you’re visiting them often enough?   When your elderly relative reaches the point of requiring home care you may have already got into a routine of visiting them daily to check up on their well-being and it can seem quite alien to no longer have that responsibility.  Equally, you may feel guilt for not visiting daily and for leaving your loved one in someone else’s hands.   In safe hands All live-in carers go through a rigorous process to ensure that they are trustworthy and capable. Introductory agencies will perform through background checks including following up references and commissioning DBS searches before allowing any carers details to be passed onto families. Full-management agencies will perform equally deep checks, but additionally may provide their own training to ensure that your carer can cope with whatever the placement throws at them.   You can find out more at the live in care hub about what checks a carer is required to undergo before starting work, but what this means in practice is that you can rest assured that your parent or other elderly relation, is going to be cared for professionally and consistently by their carer. How often is too often? A live-in carer is there not just to care for their client but to help the family by taking over the care of their elderly relative. Obviously if you spend as much time at your loved one’s home as you did previously you will achieve nothing other than getting in the way of the carer’s work! Short daily visits are perfectly adequate to check that the carer has no concerns and to keep in touch with your loved one. Depending on what you, the carer and the agency have agreed these visits may be timed to coincide with the carer’s breaks, ensuring 24/7 coverage in care for your relation.   How often is too rare? Trusting your live-in carer is essential to the relationship you have with them – and once they’ve settled in you can find yourself dropping visits and putting off visiting knowing that your loved one is being cared for and happy. It is important that you still keep some kind of visiting schedule. The carer can supervise your loved one’s life but they cannot run it, and there will be many situations in which you will be required to make decisions that will require your personal attention.   How do I know if I’ve got the frequency right? You gut instinct will tell you if you are visiting too often or not often enough. If you seem to be always getting in the way then perhaps you need to visit a little less often. If there always seems to be a lot of things to discuss that have changed since the last time you visited then perhaps you aren’t coming round often enough. The beauty of live-in care is that it can be precisely tailored to the family the carer is working for, so try different frequencies until it feels right.
    202 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Checking on a live-in carer doesn’t need to be as frequent as checking on an elderly relative, but how do you know if you’re visiting them often enough?   When your elderly relative reaches the point of requiring home care you may have already got into a routine of visiting them daily to check up on their well-being and it can seem quite alien to no longer have that responsibility.  Equally, you may feel guilt for not visiting daily and for leaving your loved one in someone else’s hands.   In safe hands All live-in carers go through a rigorous process to ensure that they are trustworthy and capable. Introductory agencies will perform through background checks including following up references and commissioning DBS searches before allowing any carers details to be passed onto families. Full-management agencies will perform equally deep checks, but additionally may provide their own training to ensure that your carer can cope with whatever the placement throws at them.   You can find out more at the live in care hub about what checks a carer is required to undergo before starting work, but what this means in practice is that you can rest assured that your parent or other elderly relation, is going to be cared for professionally and consistently by their carer. How often is too often? A live-in carer is there not just to care for their client but to help the family by taking over the care of their elderly relative. Obviously if you spend as much time at your loved one’s home as you did previously you will achieve nothing other than getting in the way of the carer’s work! Short daily visits are perfectly adequate to check that the carer has no concerns and to keep in touch with your loved one. Depending on what you, the carer and the agency have agreed these visits may be timed to coincide with the carer’s breaks, ensuring 24/7 coverage in care for your relation.   How often is too rare? Trusting your live-in carer is essential to the relationship you have with them – and once they’ve settled in you can find yourself dropping visits and putting off visiting knowing that your loved one is being cared for and happy. It is important that you still keep some kind of visiting schedule. The carer can supervise your loved one’s life but they cannot run it, and there will be many situations in which you will be required to make decisions that will require your personal attention.   How do I know if I’ve got the frequency right? You gut instinct will tell you if you are visiting too often or not often enough. If you seem to be always getting in the way then perhaps you need to visit a little less often. If there always seems to be a lot of things to discuss that have changed since the last time you visited then perhaps you aren’t coming round often enough. The beauty of live-in care is that it can be precisely tailored to the family the carer is working for, so try different frequencies until it feels right.
    Aug 06, 2019 202
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Once you’ve decided that live-in care is best how do you know if a carer is going to get on with your relative?   A live-in carer lives in your loved one’s spare room. That might sound like it’s stating the obvious but it is an important point as it means that your loved one and live-in carer need to be able to get along as they will be spending a lot of time together.   Shared interests Live-in carers provide companionship as well as care. Live-in care agencies have in-depth matchmaking processes which pick out the carers from their list who are most likely to have similar interests and passions to your loved one.   A study by the Live-in Care Hub found the top-ten things carers and their clients like to talk about are:   The elderly person’s personal memories Family The Royal Family The weather Travel Food and drink Classic musicals or musical films such as The Sound of Music Politics Entertainers from the 1940s and 1950s TV series Dad’s Army   Medical needs The other main criteria for matching carers to clients is to ensure that the client’s care and medical needs are met. If your relative is suffering from dementia then a carer with specialist training in supporting dementia sufferers will be required. Carers can also specialise is Parkinson’s, stroke recovery, diabetes management, spinal injuries care and other conditions that need particular expertise.   Different carers bring different outlooks In order to provide a high-quality of 24/7 care live-in carers operate on a rota system with two or three carers working for the same client. The exact rota will depend on the needs of the client. This means there is not one, but two or three different people to be matched to your relative – and it means that your relative has a chance to make not one but two or three new friends. Many clients find it refreshing to have someone interested in the same things that they are, and to be able to discuss different things with different carers.   Sometimes elderly people find new hobbies by having an interest kindled by their carers. Knitting may be too difficult for arthritic fingers, but a comment by one of their carers might give them a new hobby rock painting – even taking the rocks to the local park to be hidden with the support of their new friend.   Not every relationship works Even with the most diligent matchmaking process sometimes two people just don’t get along whatever happens. Perhaps they’re just a little too similar and rub each other up the wrong way. Who knows! If it does turn out that your loved one isn’t getting on with one of their carers then do let your agency know. They will be able to arrange a replacement who, hopefully, will get on with your relative a little bit better. Carers want their clients to be happy and cheerful so they understand if a placement simply isn’t working out the way it should.
    192 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Once you’ve decided that live-in care is best how do you know if a carer is going to get on with your relative?   A live-in carer lives in your loved one’s spare room. That might sound like it’s stating the obvious but it is an important point as it means that your loved one and live-in carer need to be able to get along as they will be spending a lot of time together.   Shared interests Live-in carers provide companionship as well as care. Live-in care agencies have in-depth matchmaking processes which pick out the carers from their list who are most likely to have similar interests and passions to your loved one.   A study by the Live-in Care Hub found the top-ten things carers and their clients like to talk about are:   The elderly person’s personal memories Family The Royal Family The weather Travel Food and drink Classic musicals or musical films such as The Sound of Music Politics Entertainers from the 1940s and 1950s TV series Dad’s Army   Medical needs The other main criteria for matching carers to clients is to ensure that the client’s care and medical needs are met. If your relative is suffering from dementia then a carer with specialist training in supporting dementia sufferers will be required. Carers can also specialise is Parkinson’s, stroke recovery, diabetes management, spinal injuries care and other conditions that need particular expertise.   Different carers bring different outlooks In order to provide a high-quality of 24/7 care live-in carers operate on a rota system with two or three carers working for the same client. The exact rota will depend on the needs of the client. This means there is not one, but two or three different people to be matched to your relative – and it means that your relative has a chance to make not one but two or three new friends. Many clients find it refreshing to have someone interested in the same things that they are, and to be able to discuss different things with different carers.   Sometimes elderly people find new hobbies by having an interest kindled by their carers. Knitting may be too difficult for arthritic fingers, but a comment by one of their carers might give them a new hobby rock painting – even taking the rocks to the local park to be hidden with the support of their new friend.   Not every relationship works Even with the most diligent matchmaking process sometimes two people just don’t get along whatever happens. Perhaps they’re just a little too similar and rub each other up the wrong way. Who knows! If it does turn out that your loved one isn’t getting on with one of their carers then do let your agency know. They will be able to arrange a replacement who, hopefully, will get on with your relative a little bit better. Carers want their clients to be happy and cheerful so they understand if a placement simply isn’t working out the way it should.
    Aug 06, 2019 192
  • 06 Aug 2019
    If you or your loved one has complex medical needs is the only option to move into a nursing home or is live-in care still a possibility?     Life is never straightforward and perhaps nowhere is this more apparent than in how we age. Some people are healthy, active and happy up until their last days while others suffer from multiple conditions, each requiring careful management to ensure a good quality of life.   Research by the Live-in Care hub shows that 70% of respondents thought that their elderly relative might have to go into residential care, yet 97% of people wouldn’t want to move into a care home – even if they were ill or unable to cope on their own.   “Live-in care is just about keeping my Nan company isn’t it?” The discrepancy lies in the way in which people view home carers – especially live-in carers. The public perception is often of low-skilled workers with just enough to training to make a cup of tea and change soiled bedclothes.   The reality couldn’t be further from the dark picture the media likes to paint. Many home care roles are taken by people who have already got experience in caring for the elderly. Some have spent time looking after their own relatives and want to make it a career, while others are trained healthcare professionals who would prefer to work on a one-to-one basis with an individual client or couple.   Live-in carers are supported by their agencies who will organise training courses to cover specific areas of elderly care. It is perfectly possible to employ a live-in carer who has expertise in dementia, Parkinson’s, stroke recovery, or other conditions, and who is continuing to receive updates to their training during the time they are not at the client’s home.   “But Dad needs those injections and he can’t get out of bed on his own. Won’t he be better off in a nursing home?” Carers are trained to help transfer from bed to wheelchair or wheelchair to toilet – that’s part of the service. Usually they will require the use of a hoist as they cannot lift a person single-handedly. Where the use of a hoist isn’t possible then two carers may be required to meet the needs of your father – but that still doesn’t mean he needs to move home!   Most live-in carers are not nurses and therefore cannot perform actual nursing duties such as giving injections or wound dressing. However the local District Nursing team may be able to visit, and some live-in care agencies can provide live-in nursing care – complex needs can be managed at home!   “Won’t it be cheaper in a home? Won’t they have economies of scale?” You may be surprised how cheap live-in care is compared to residential care fees, and those economies of scale can mean quality of life is compromised. For example, 81% of Live-in Care Hub clients say they get the food and drink they want, when they want it, compared to just 52% of nursing home residents and 8% of care residents think they do not get enough to eat and drink!    
    209 Posted by Anna Preston
  • If you or your loved one has complex medical needs is the only option to move into a nursing home or is live-in care still a possibility?     Life is never straightforward and perhaps nowhere is this more apparent than in how we age. Some people are healthy, active and happy up until their last days while others suffer from multiple conditions, each requiring careful management to ensure a good quality of life.   Research by the Live-in Care hub shows that 70% of respondents thought that their elderly relative might have to go into residential care, yet 97% of people wouldn’t want to move into a care home – even if they were ill or unable to cope on their own.   “Live-in care is just about keeping my Nan company isn’t it?” The discrepancy lies in the way in which people view home carers – especially live-in carers. The public perception is often of low-skilled workers with just enough to training to make a cup of tea and change soiled bedclothes.   The reality couldn’t be further from the dark picture the media likes to paint. Many home care roles are taken by people who have already got experience in caring for the elderly. Some have spent time looking after their own relatives and want to make it a career, while others are trained healthcare professionals who would prefer to work on a one-to-one basis with an individual client or couple.   Live-in carers are supported by their agencies who will organise training courses to cover specific areas of elderly care. It is perfectly possible to employ a live-in carer who has expertise in dementia, Parkinson’s, stroke recovery, or other conditions, and who is continuing to receive updates to their training during the time they are not at the client’s home.   “But Dad needs those injections and he can’t get out of bed on his own. Won’t he be better off in a nursing home?” Carers are trained to help transfer from bed to wheelchair or wheelchair to toilet – that’s part of the service. Usually they will require the use of a hoist as they cannot lift a person single-handedly. Where the use of a hoist isn’t possible then two carers may be required to meet the needs of your father – but that still doesn’t mean he needs to move home!   Most live-in carers are not nurses and therefore cannot perform actual nursing duties such as giving injections or wound dressing. However the local District Nursing team may be able to visit, and some live-in care agencies can provide live-in nursing care – complex needs can be managed at home!   “Won’t it be cheaper in a home? Won’t they have economies of scale?” You may be surprised how cheap live-in care is compared to residential care fees, and those economies of scale can mean quality of life is compromised. For example, 81% of Live-in Care Hub clients say they get the food and drink they want, when they want it, compared to just 52% of nursing home residents and 8% of care residents think they do not get enough to eat and drink!    
    Aug 06, 2019 209
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Dementia is a symptom of a number of illnesses characterised by a degradation in brain function. Here are some other facts and figures about the condition.   Research by the live-in care hub shows that dementia is now more feared than cancer. The study found that 34% of all adults fear suffering from the condition in later life, although more than half (52%) are now more comfortable talking about the condition than they were ten years ago.   With the total number of people with dementia set to rise by 38% over the next 15 years it’s vitally important that you talk to your family now, rather than later, about your wishes should dementia strike – especially if there is a family history of the condition.   What is dementia? Dementia is a symptom, not an illness. It can be caused by various illnesses, of which Alzheimer’s is the most common and thus well-known. Other forms include vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies.   The precise direction dementia takes depends on the underlying cause but symptoms may include:   failure to recognise familiar people or situations disorientation mood changes hallucinations, delusions or “living in the past” reduced ability to care for oneself language loss, difficulty following a conversation or television programme memory loss, especially very short term memory   Caring for someone with dementia By 2037 the number of carers will have to have risen to 9 million to cope with rising numbers of sufferers. Currently more than 520,000 people have dementia caused by Alzheimers alone, and around 850,000 people have some form of dementia.   Sufferers of dementia respond well to highly individualised care. One sufferer may be perfectly capable of performing daily tasks – but be unable to look after themselves because their short term memory is so badly affected they cannot finish a task once started. Another may have difficulty with spatial awareness, making moving around their home difficult.   Familiarity can be important to people with dementia, and moving to a care home can be extremely unsettling.  Live in care or homecare services provided by a specialist carer trained in dementia care can be extremely beneficial, allowing the elderly person to maintain a high degree of independence. Keeping active and socialising can be extremely beneficial to people with dementia but it can be difficult for sufferers to do so without support from their family or a live-in carer. Not just a part of ageing Dementia is a specific type of brain damage and not an inevitable part of the ageing process. In fact, around 42,000 people are diagnosed with it before the age of 65. As the disease progresses you will lose your ability to think rationally so it is important to discuss your future with your family as soon as possible. Even if you don’t think there is a problem you should talk to your loved ones so that financial planning can start to support your care in the future. Ensuring that your family is aware of your wishes as regards where you live and who cares for you while you still have full mental capacity will improve your quality of care in the future.
    308 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Dementia is a symptom of a number of illnesses characterised by a degradation in brain function. Here are some other facts and figures about the condition.   Research by the live-in care hub shows that dementia is now more feared than cancer. The study found that 34% of all adults fear suffering from the condition in later life, although more than half (52%) are now more comfortable talking about the condition than they were ten years ago.   With the total number of people with dementia set to rise by 38% over the next 15 years it’s vitally important that you talk to your family now, rather than later, about your wishes should dementia strike – especially if there is a family history of the condition.   What is dementia? Dementia is a symptom, not an illness. It can be caused by various illnesses, of which Alzheimer’s is the most common and thus well-known. Other forms include vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies.   The precise direction dementia takes depends on the underlying cause but symptoms may include:   failure to recognise familiar people or situations disorientation mood changes hallucinations, delusions or “living in the past” reduced ability to care for oneself language loss, difficulty following a conversation or television programme memory loss, especially very short term memory   Caring for someone with dementia By 2037 the number of carers will have to have risen to 9 million to cope with rising numbers of sufferers. Currently more than 520,000 people have dementia caused by Alzheimers alone, and around 850,000 people have some form of dementia.   Sufferers of dementia respond well to highly individualised care. One sufferer may be perfectly capable of performing daily tasks – but be unable to look after themselves because their short term memory is so badly affected they cannot finish a task once started. Another may have difficulty with spatial awareness, making moving around their home difficult.   Familiarity can be important to people with dementia, and moving to a care home can be extremely unsettling.  Live in care or homecare services provided by a specialist carer trained in dementia care can be extremely beneficial, allowing the elderly person to maintain a high degree of independence. Keeping active and socialising can be extremely beneficial to people with dementia but it can be difficult for sufferers to do so without support from their family or a live-in carer. Not just a part of ageing Dementia is a specific type of brain damage and not an inevitable part of the ageing process. In fact, around 42,000 people are diagnosed with it before the age of 65. As the disease progresses you will lose your ability to think rationally so it is important to discuss your future with your family as soon as possible. Even if you don’t think there is a problem you should talk to your loved ones so that financial planning can start to support your care in the future. Ensuring that your family is aware of your wishes as regards where you live and who cares for you while you still have full mental capacity will improve your quality of care in the future.
    Aug 06, 2019 308
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Live-in care is provided on a personal basis – so does that mean you need two carers for a couple? Find out in this article.   When extra care support becomes inevitable it can seem equally inevitable that an elderly couple will need to be split up. While there are care homes that can take a couple spaces are limited and there may be waiting lists. Plus there will be two sets of fees to consider.   Unless both clients have very complex health needs it is usually the case that one home carer can provide care. With only one set of fees the cost is vastly reduced compared to the simple doubling of cost that occurs when you choose a care home. You can find out more at the Live-in Care Hub about fees and agencies.   Care for one, companionship for two Often it is the case that one client needs significantly more care than the other. In some cases, bringing in a carer for the less independent person can reduce the load on the other and improve their independence as they no longer need to be a carer themselves.   A live-in carer of course provides homecare services for elderly people, but is also there for emotional support, and this can be extremely important to the client who has been providing care. Giving them a sympathetic ear to listen to them can significantly improve their mental health and give them a more positive outlook.   Different care needs, same carer It is rare that two people have precisely the same care needs as ageing affects people in different ways. A single live-in carer is able to tailor their service to the precise needs of the couple, cooking food that they both like or taking one to a hairdressers appointment while the other is at a social club. The needs of the couple as a couple can be considered providing a precisely tailored service to meet those needs.   Actually you might need two carers! While you only need to pay one fee for a couple you will probably get to know more than one carer. Carers are people, just like you but with years of experience in caring for the elderly and a significant number of hours of training in specialisms such as dementia, stroke victims or caring for Parkinson’s sufferers. If round the clock care is required then you will usually have a team of two or three carers who will work together on a rota to ensure that your loved ones are always cared for appropriately.   This ensures that your relatives will be cared for in their own home, surrounded by familiar possessions and pets and by people they can get to know and trust fully. You will need to discuss with your live-in care agency exactly how many carers will be on the rota, and for how long each will be staying with your family as it will depend on many factors such as how much support is needed overnight, and whether you are still intending to provide care during the day to allow the live-in carer a daily break from their duties.  
    194 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Live-in care is provided on a personal basis – so does that mean you need two carers for a couple? Find out in this article.   When extra care support becomes inevitable it can seem equally inevitable that an elderly couple will need to be split up. While there are care homes that can take a couple spaces are limited and there may be waiting lists. Plus there will be two sets of fees to consider.   Unless both clients have very complex health needs it is usually the case that one home carer can provide care. With only one set of fees the cost is vastly reduced compared to the simple doubling of cost that occurs when you choose a care home. You can find out more at the Live-in Care Hub about fees and agencies.   Care for one, companionship for two Often it is the case that one client needs significantly more care than the other. In some cases, bringing in a carer for the less independent person can reduce the load on the other and improve their independence as they no longer need to be a carer themselves.   A live-in carer of course provides homecare services for elderly people, but is also there for emotional support, and this can be extremely important to the client who has been providing care. Giving them a sympathetic ear to listen to them can significantly improve their mental health and give them a more positive outlook.   Different care needs, same carer It is rare that two people have precisely the same care needs as ageing affects people in different ways. A single live-in carer is able to tailor their service to the precise needs of the couple, cooking food that they both like or taking one to a hairdressers appointment while the other is at a social club. The needs of the couple as a couple can be considered providing a precisely tailored service to meet those needs.   Actually you might need two carers! While you only need to pay one fee for a couple you will probably get to know more than one carer. Carers are people, just like you but with years of experience in caring for the elderly and a significant number of hours of training in specialisms such as dementia, stroke victims or caring for Parkinson’s sufferers. If round the clock care is required then you will usually have a team of two or three carers who will work together on a rota to ensure that your loved ones are always cared for appropriately.   This ensures that your relatives will be cared for in their own home, surrounded by familiar possessions and pets and by people they can get to know and trust fully. You will need to discuss with your live-in care agency exactly how many carers will be on the rota, and for how long each will be staying with your family as it will depend on many factors such as how much support is needed overnight, and whether you are still intending to provide care during the day to allow the live-in carer a daily break from their duties.  
    Aug 06, 2019 194
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Slowing down is a natural part of ageing – so how do you know the difference between what’s normal and when there’s a real issue with mobility?   Getting old inevitably means muscles and joints don’t work as well as they used to. It’s natural to take longer to walk to the shops, or to find carrying the shopping back again a little harder. One of the best ways to avoid mobility issues is to keep active for as long as possible, which can also help improve mental health and help retain independence, but sometimes nature has other ideas and conditions such as arthritis, rheumatism, heart disease and obesity can make moving around difficult. Causes of mobility problems According to Live-in Care Hub one of the biggest causes of mobility problems is falling. Falls can result in broken bones, more common in the elderly as bone density decreases with age, and loss of confidence which in turn can reduce mobility and compound the problem. Even minor slips and stumbles can shake an elderly person’s confidence in themselves.   Heart disease can be another reason older people don’t move around as much. If activity brings on angina, breathlessness or a racing pulse the sufferer may start to be less mobile, especially out of the home.   Obesity can sometimes cause issues with mobility, with fat deposits making it harder for muscles to work. Not all obesity is caused simply by poor diet – diabetes, a common complaint in later years, can make the body stockpile fat reserves. Signs to look out for Mobility problems can occur instantly – as the result of a fall for example, or can gradually become apparent. If you are caring for an elderly person it can be important to take time regularly to assess their  needs, and arrange the appropriate homecare services  to support their independence. Signs to watch out for include: taking longer to answer the door a lack of fresh food in the house not seeing friends or attending clubs for several days, missing appointments standards of housework or tidiness deteriorating finding it harder to stand up or sitting down unsteadily having difficulties with stairs, even just in one direction finding it hard to balance when walking, appearing unsteady   What should I do if I notice a problem? Mobility issues can lead to reduced mobility which can lead to further mobility problems. It is important that the issue is brought to the attention of the doctor caring for the elderly person. Some medications can cause balance problems, and if the symptoms are identified the dose can be altered or medication changed to avoid the problem getting worse. Encouraging movement can help strengthen muscles and improve balance. Suggest a walk in the garden or park. A good way to get exercise is to go swimming or attend an aquafit class – some areas have specialist sessions for older swimmers where the water is warmer and the atmosphere is calmer. Ensure trip hazards are removed from the home to guard against falls. Dementia sufferers can have problems with spatial awareness to make sure you keep doors clear and take up rugs.  
    209 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Slowing down is a natural part of ageing – so how do you know the difference between what’s normal and when there’s a real issue with mobility?   Getting old inevitably means muscles and joints don’t work as well as they used to. It’s natural to take longer to walk to the shops, or to find carrying the shopping back again a little harder. One of the best ways to avoid mobility issues is to keep active for as long as possible, which can also help improve mental health and help retain independence, but sometimes nature has other ideas and conditions such as arthritis, rheumatism, heart disease and obesity can make moving around difficult. Causes of mobility problems According to Live-in Care Hub one of the biggest causes of mobility problems is falling. Falls can result in broken bones, more common in the elderly as bone density decreases with age, and loss of confidence which in turn can reduce mobility and compound the problem. Even minor slips and stumbles can shake an elderly person’s confidence in themselves.   Heart disease can be another reason older people don’t move around as much. If activity brings on angina, breathlessness or a racing pulse the sufferer may start to be less mobile, especially out of the home.   Obesity can sometimes cause issues with mobility, with fat deposits making it harder for muscles to work. Not all obesity is caused simply by poor diet – diabetes, a common complaint in later years, can make the body stockpile fat reserves. Signs to look out for Mobility problems can occur instantly – as the result of a fall for example, or can gradually become apparent. If you are caring for an elderly person it can be important to take time regularly to assess their  needs, and arrange the appropriate homecare services  to support their independence. Signs to watch out for include: taking longer to answer the door a lack of fresh food in the house not seeing friends or attending clubs for several days, missing appointments standards of housework or tidiness deteriorating finding it harder to stand up or sitting down unsteadily having difficulties with stairs, even just in one direction finding it hard to balance when walking, appearing unsteady   What should I do if I notice a problem? Mobility issues can lead to reduced mobility which can lead to further mobility problems. It is important that the issue is brought to the attention of the doctor caring for the elderly person. Some medications can cause balance problems, and if the symptoms are identified the dose can be altered or medication changed to avoid the problem getting worse. Encouraging movement can help strengthen muscles and improve balance. Suggest a walk in the garden or park. A good way to get exercise is to go swimming or attend an aquafit class – some areas have specialist sessions for older swimmers where the water is warmer and the atmosphere is calmer. Ensure trip hazards are removed from the home to guard against falls. Dementia sufferers can have problems with spatial awareness to make sure you keep doors clear and take up rugs.  
    Aug 06, 2019 209
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Caring for a loved one can be difficult, but a live-in carer can help take some of the strain as we discuss in this article.     Caring for your elderly relatives, whether they are your parents, aunts, uncles or cousins, can be a rewarding job. Being able to spend quality time with them, to really get to know them and to be able to ease their final years.   It can also be a thankless job. Research by the live in care hub shows that, when talking about caring for a parent with dementia, a whopping 78% believe they would end up resenting their loved one. The reasons for this are many and include: lack of knowledge of how to care for someone with dementia means well-meaning attempts to communicate can have adverse effects, leading to anxiety, confusion and anger in the sufferer; needing to put your own life on hold to run someone else’s can cause feelings of resentment; having to perform caring tasks, such as helping with toileting, can strain family relationships; not being able to take a break is exhausting and can lead to depression.   What does a live-in carer do? Live-in care varies from providing companionship and 24/7 supervision for an elderly person who might be a high risk of falling or having a medical emergency to providing full care for someone who cannot care for themselves any longer.   A carer can do light housework, cook nutritious meals, drive your relative to healthcare appointments or to spend time at day centres, help with toileting or bathing, ensuring medication is taken and help them get dressed and undressed at the start and end of the day. In addition to general caring responsibilities, a live-in carer will also act as a friend and companion for your loved one. They can encourage them to continue their hobbies and support them to try new experiences. Or they can just be there to make lots of cups of tea and listen to their client talking about the good old days.   Specialist care Many live-in carers have previously worked in caring or healthcare roles and have specialisms in caring for particular conditions. Dementia specialist carers, for example, understand how to communicate with a confused patient to ensure they remain happy and calm. They can suggest ways in which the home can be made more dementia friendly – and recommend which areas which should be left alone. Whilst they are not night shift workers they do accept that they may have to get up in the night to help their client use the toilet, or to prevent night wandering if they awake in a confused state. This gives you peace of mind that your loved one is being cared for even when you can’t be in their house with them.   Relief Care You may not yet need a full-time live-in carer, being happy to provide some of the care yourself. Some agencies can provide short-term cover, allowing you to take a break from your caring responsibilities. This could be to allow you to take a holiday, or on a regular basis, for example over the weekend.
    173 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Caring for a loved one can be difficult, but a live-in carer can help take some of the strain as we discuss in this article.     Caring for your elderly relatives, whether they are your parents, aunts, uncles or cousins, can be a rewarding job. Being able to spend quality time with them, to really get to know them and to be able to ease their final years.   It can also be a thankless job. Research by the live in care hub shows that, when talking about caring for a parent with dementia, a whopping 78% believe they would end up resenting their loved one. The reasons for this are many and include: lack of knowledge of how to care for someone with dementia means well-meaning attempts to communicate can have adverse effects, leading to anxiety, confusion and anger in the sufferer; needing to put your own life on hold to run someone else’s can cause feelings of resentment; having to perform caring tasks, such as helping with toileting, can strain family relationships; not being able to take a break is exhausting and can lead to depression.   What does a live-in carer do? Live-in care varies from providing companionship and 24/7 supervision for an elderly person who might be a high risk of falling or having a medical emergency to providing full care for someone who cannot care for themselves any longer.   A carer can do light housework, cook nutritious meals, drive your relative to healthcare appointments or to spend time at day centres, help with toileting or bathing, ensuring medication is taken and help them get dressed and undressed at the start and end of the day. In addition to general caring responsibilities, a live-in carer will also act as a friend and companion for your loved one. They can encourage them to continue their hobbies and support them to try new experiences. Or they can just be there to make lots of cups of tea and listen to their client talking about the good old days.   Specialist care Many live-in carers have previously worked in caring or healthcare roles and have specialisms in caring for particular conditions. Dementia specialist carers, for example, understand how to communicate with a confused patient to ensure they remain happy and calm. They can suggest ways in which the home can be made more dementia friendly – and recommend which areas which should be left alone. Whilst they are not night shift workers they do accept that they may have to get up in the night to help their client use the toilet, or to prevent night wandering if they awake in a confused state. This gives you peace of mind that your loved one is being cared for even when you can’t be in their house with them.   Relief Care You may not yet need a full-time live-in carer, being happy to provide some of the care yourself. Some agencies can provide short-term cover, allowing you to take a break from your caring responsibilities. This could be to allow you to take a holiday, or on a regular basis, for example over the weekend.
    Aug 06, 2019 173