Members: 0 member(s)

Shares ?

0

Clicks ?

0

Viral Lift ?

0%

Family & Home 498 views Jun 13, 2018
Live-in care and other options for care of the elderly

 

The first thing most people assume about caring for the elderly when they can no longer manage on their own is that the main option is a residential care homes. Elderly people often feel they will be “shipped off” to a communal home and have to leave all their valued possessions behind and live their final days in one room. Residential care home can be very nice with lovely communal areas and gardens but nevertheless they are still not the same as your own home with friends and neighbours nearby. And if you have a pet you certainly won't be able to take a pet to a care home. But there is another, increasingly popular option, and that is live-in care of home care as it is sometimes known.

Live-in care or homecare is just one of a range of care services available in the UK for old people so it is good to be aware of what all the care options are so when the time comes and you or your elderly relative requires help then the right choice can be made.

Residential care homes

Care homes are most well-known type of care available in the UK for senior people who need help with the everyday tasks of life. There is a wide range of care homes across the UK varying in size, type and cost so there is something to suit all budgets. Care homes can be a good choice for many people as it provides a type of community with shared activities and being able to eat in communal dining rooms.

They may also be the best option for people who need high levels of care, especially when nursing care is required or when there are particular needs such as for dementia sufferers.

Live-in care

Live-in care or homecare, as it is also known, is a care option that is only just starting to become more widely known although it has been around for many years. One of the main advantages of live-in care is that the person being cared for remains in their family home, which is often a place they have lived for many, many years with all its valued possessions and treasured memories. Live-in care is a suitable option even when someone requires specialist nursing care as the live-in carer can organise other help to come to the house as required. A live-in carer moves into the family home and caters for all care needs but also provides companionship and a sense of security for the elderly person. Those who are becoming a carer as their career are well-trained to offer stability and consistency that can quite simply mean the elderly person is happier and more relaxed and many a firm friendship has been forged with a carer. It is much easier for a live-in carer to know the likes and dislikes of the elderly person as they can focus all their attention on caring for that one person, which is very unlike what happens in care homes.


Tags: #carer 

Anna Preston 's Entries

35 blogs
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Information and resources explaining how much you could get paid if you want to take on the rewarding job of a live-in carer.   In the UK our ageing population is getting much bigger fairly quickly. It is thought that within the next 26 years, a quarter of the population will be aged 65 and over. With that increase in the need for care, means there is a huge need for additional carers within the care industry. Elderly care homes always need additional staff but the biggest demand in care jobs comes from the care at home sector. Care worker jobs are in high demand when it comes to live-in care and home care services because it is now coming to light that care in the home is a really beneficial form of care all round.   Aside from the fact most people don't want to go into residential care, elderly care homes can't keep up with demand. The NHS is also struggling as there is an increase in elderly patients with nowhere to place them when they are well enough to leave the hospital. With live-in care, the benefits are spread to everyone. The client is happy remaining at home and the costs can compare favourably to residential care. There's also no need to move area or wait for a place in a local care home. The NHS benefits too because it doesn't have so many beds taken up with elderly patients, and live-in carers can enjoy a fulfilling and rewarding job where they are able to apply the care they were trained to give. Live-in Care Work: An Overview If you are thinking of looking into live-in care worker jobs, or applying to a live-in care agency, you will want to know the basics of what the job involves. Firstly, you should know that although it does mean you live with the client, it doesn't mean you have to be on call constantly. You are entitled to breaks and private time, and you often share your job with another carer. Usually you will work for two weeks and then swap with another carer for two weeks.   You will also have your own private room and that room is checked for suitability by the live-in care agency who will be your main employers. The agency will also train you and support you in any help or advice you need in your job role. You may be required to provide a number of different services including: personal care, cooking, cleaning, help with mobility, help with medication timetables, gardening, pet care and accompaniment to appointments.   You may also need to provide specialist care such as dementia support. You will not be placed on any jobs without the qualifications or training to complete what is needed, and you will be able to let us know which services you would prefer not to provide. How Much Do Live-in Carers Get Paid? The amount you are paid depends on lots of factors such as your previous experience, training, specialities, hours worked and the range of services you provide to the client. A very rough guide is between £300 and £600 pounds per week but the amount can vary hugely depending on each job.   Usually you will get paid every month and you will be entitled to sick pay and holiday pay too. Look Into Live-in Care Worker Jobs Today Live-in care worker jobs are on offer right now from various live-in care agencies across the country. There is a lot of work on offer, and with the right initial ingredients, you don't usually need a high education or lots of previous experience and training to gain employment. A good live-in care agency will provide you with all the training you need. Why not look into care worker jobs today? It could be your first step towards gaining the kind of compassionate job you always hoped you'd be able to do.  
    783 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Information and resources explaining how much you could get paid if you want to take on the rewarding job of a live-in carer.   In the UK our ageing population is getting much bigger fairly quickly. It is thought that within the next 26 years, a quarter of the population will be aged 65 and over. With that increase in the need for care, means there is a huge need for additional carers within the care industry. Elderly care homes always need additional staff but the biggest demand in care jobs comes from the care at home sector. Care worker jobs are in high demand when it comes to live-in care and home care services because it is now coming to light that care in the home is a really beneficial form of care all round.   Aside from the fact most people don't want to go into residential care, elderly care homes can't keep up with demand. The NHS is also struggling as there is an increase in elderly patients with nowhere to place them when they are well enough to leave the hospital. With live-in care, the benefits are spread to everyone. The client is happy remaining at home and the costs can compare favourably to residential care. There's also no need to move area or wait for a place in a local care home. The NHS benefits too because it doesn't have so many beds taken up with elderly patients, and live-in carers can enjoy a fulfilling and rewarding job where they are able to apply the care they were trained to give. Live-in Care Work: An Overview If you are thinking of looking into live-in care worker jobs, or applying to a live-in care agency, you will want to know the basics of what the job involves. Firstly, you should know that although it does mean you live with the client, it doesn't mean you have to be on call constantly. You are entitled to breaks and private time, and you often share your job with another carer. Usually you will work for two weeks and then swap with another carer for two weeks.   You will also have your own private room and that room is checked for suitability by the live-in care agency who will be your main employers. The agency will also train you and support you in any help or advice you need in your job role. You may be required to provide a number of different services including: personal care, cooking, cleaning, help with mobility, help with medication timetables, gardening, pet care and accompaniment to appointments.   You may also need to provide specialist care such as dementia support. You will not be placed on any jobs without the qualifications or training to complete what is needed, and you will be able to let us know which services you would prefer not to provide. How Much Do Live-in Carers Get Paid? The amount you are paid depends on lots of factors such as your previous experience, training, specialities, hours worked and the range of services you provide to the client. A very rough guide is between £300 and £600 pounds per week but the amount can vary hugely depending on each job.   Usually you will get paid every month and you will be entitled to sick pay and holiday pay too. Look Into Live-in Care Worker Jobs Today Live-in care worker jobs are on offer right now from various live-in care agencies across the country. There is a lot of work on offer, and with the right initial ingredients, you don't usually need a high education or lots of previous experience and training to gain employment. A good live-in care agency will provide you with all the training you need. Why not look into care worker jobs today? It could be your first step towards gaining the kind of compassionate job you always hoped you'd be able to do.  
    Aug 06, 2019 783
  • 06 Aug 2019
    According to a technical SEO specialist I know, adding images to a website used to be so simple, now you’ve got to worry about conforming to the recommendations of your search engine as well as ensuring your browser allows Google’s recommendation. Once you could just serve your image as a JPG, GIF or PNG and Google wouldn’t bat an eyelid. However, in 2019 things have changed as search engines seem to want images in a “next-gen” format which, according to Google are: “Image formats like JPEG 2000, JPEG XR, and WebP [which] often provide better compression than PNG or JPEG, which means faster downloads and less data consumption” In English this means that traditional image formats such as JPGs, GIFs, and PNGs will now slow down your website. In contrast, “next-gen” formats will speed up your site which is crucial if the SEO services you are employing are to have the fullest effect. So, all you need to di is change the format of your served images to either JPEG 2000s, JPEG XRs, or WebPs. Easy right. Well it’s actually not that simple - some browsers don’t actually support these new formats. Don’t worry though, there is a relatively simple trick to serve images as WebPs (the most supported and popular of the next-gen images) and it requires you to follow two simple steps: Add plugins (if your site is Wordpress) Serve new WebP images Adding Plugins Required to Serve Images in Next-Gen Formats: There are two plugins you’ll need for your Wordpress site: WebP Express ShortPixel (make sure you have an account for this one) The first of these, WebP Express plugin, is essentially a tool that adds some code to your WordPress site that ensures WebP images are properly and fully served in browsers that support WebP images. Additionally, in other browsers where WebP images aren’t supported, this plugin will serve the default image (e.g. JPEG, GIF, or PNG). The other required plugin is ShortPixel which compresses and optimises images using various different tools. You’ll be using the ShortPixel Image Optimisation Plugin. To install both of the plugins simply go to your WordPress website and: Select plugins from the Dashboard menu Select add new Search for the plugin Click Install Click Activate Serving Images in the Next-Gen Format WebP: Unlike WebP Express, the ShortPixel plugin needs some configuration to work. Before we do this, however, you should make sure you have a ShortPixel account. There is a free option as well as a paid option either of which will be acceptable. However, if you can afford to spend a bit more, the paid option will provide a better experience than the free version as you’ll get more support. But don’t feel like you have to spend money. Once logged-in, find your API key from the menu and take a note of it. Now we’ll configure ShortPixel: Under Settings go to ShortPixel Go to General Paste your API key into the correct field Save changes Go to the Advanced tab Check that “Also create WebP versions of the images, for free” is selected Check that “Deliver WebP versions of the images in the front-end” is selected Select the “Only via WordPress hooks” option Save and Go to Bulk Process Your website will now begin bulk processing all of your images. This will usually take three to four hours to finish. Congratulations, you’ve successfully set up the plugins and now your website will run smoothly, efficiently and in accordance with your search engines preferences.
    669 Posted by Anna Preston
  • According to a technical SEO specialist I know, adding images to a website used to be so simple, now you’ve got to worry about conforming to the recommendations of your search engine as well as ensuring your browser allows Google’s recommendation. Once you could just serve your image as a JPG, GIF or PNG and Google wouldn’t bat an eyelid. However, in 2019 things have changed as search engines seem to want images in a “next-gen” format which, according to Google are: “Image formats like JPEG 2000, JPEG XR, and WebP [which] often provide better compression than PNG or JPEG, which means faster downloads and less data consumption” In English this means that traditional image formats such as JPGs, GIFs, and PNGs will now slow down your website. In contrast, “next-gen” formats will speed up your site which is crucial if the SEO services you are employing are to have the fullest effect. So, all you need to di is change the format of your served images to either JPEG 2000s, JPEG XRs, or WebPs. Easy right. Well it’s actually not that simple - some browsers don’t actually support these new formats. Don’t worry though, there is a relatively simple trick to serve images as WebPs (the most supported and popular of the next-gen images) and it requires you to follow two simple steps: Add plugins (if your site is Wordpress) Serve new WebP images Adding Plugins Required to Serve Images in Next-Gen Formats: There are two plugins you’ll need for your Wordpress site: WebP Express ShortPixel (make sure you have an account for this one) The first of these, WebP Express plugin, is essentially a tool that adds some code to your WordPress site that ensures WebP images are properly and fully served in browsers that support WebP images. Additionally, in other browsers where WebP images aren’t supported, this plugin will serve the default image (e.g. JPEG, GIF, or PNG). The other required plugin is ShortPixel which compresses and optimises images using various different tools. You’ll be using the ShortPixel Image Optimisation Plugin. To install both of the plugins simply go to your WordPress website and: Select plugins from the Dashboard menu Select add new Search for the plugin Click Install Click Activate Serving Images in the Next-Gen Format WebP: Unlike WebP Express, the ShortPixel plugin needs some configuration to work. Before we do this, however, you should make sure you have a ShortPixel account. There is a free option as well as a paid option either of which will be acceptable. However, if you can afford to spend a bit more, the paid option will provide a better experience than the free version as you’ll get more support. But don’t feel like you have to spend money. Once logged-in, find your API key from the menu and take a note of it. Now we’ll configure ShortPixel: Under Settings go to ShortPixel Go to General Paste your API key into the correct field Save changes Go to the Advanced tab Check that “Also create WebP versions of the images, for free” is selected Check that “Deliver WebP versions of the images in the front-end” is selected Select the “Only via WordPress hooks” option Save and Go to Bulk Process Your website will now begin bulk processing all of your images. This will usually take three to four hours to finish. Congratulations, you’ve successfully set up the plugins and now your website will run smoothly, efficiently and in accordance with your search engines preferences.
    Aug 06, 2019 669
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Find out about an amazing care role you can do that provides great personal benefits, whilst enabling an elderly person to remain in their own home.   Are you looking for the kind of career that makes you feel like you have made a difference in the world? Are you looking for a job that is as challenging as it is rewarding? Would you love to work in the kind of job that enables you to apply your training properly without time constraints or budget issues?   Perhaps it is time to start looking into live-in care.   A live-in carer provides elderly care in the clients home. The level of care provided depends on the support that the client needs. In one job you may be providing basic care and companionship, helping with person tasks and otherwise being on hand for support. In another job you could be accompanying your client whilst they go on holiday, and otherwise provide them with help with personal tasks, gardening, cooking and cleaning. Jobs may be long-term or short-term and you can provide live-in care as part of a rota with another carer (2 weeks on 2 weeks off).   The Benefits For The Client There are many benefits to a client having live-in care. The primary benefit is that they get to live in their own home, rather than moving to a residential home. 97% of people would rather not go into residential care if they become unwell or unable to care for themselves. Receiving care at home means they can stay in the place they love the most. Other benefits include: Companionship - 1.9 million older people in the UK feel ignored or invisible. Having a live-in carer helps to combat loneliness by providing immediate company and supporting mobility and independence. Nutrition and help with cooking Physiotherapy if needed Specialist care for stroke recovery or dementia Safety in the home Peace of mind for the family of the client Being able to stay with a partner Being able to keep a pet   There are many more benefits, and often ones that surprise you with every new client who has their own individual needs for live-in care.   The Benefits For You Being a live-in care is incredibly rewarding and you are making a huge difference to your clients life by supporting them at home. Other benefits of being a live-in carer include:   Saving money on household bills whilst you live in the home of your client Free and frequent training from your live-in care agency Often there is no need for qualifications to get the job (you won't be placed until you have been trained) Great pay The opportunity to travel (in some jobs) A good opportunity to apply the skills you have been taught without time restrictions or budget restrictions   There are many more benefits to being a live-in carer, many of which you find out for yourself during your placements. How To Get A Job In Live-in Care Do some research and have a look at the pay, the type of tasks you will need to do, and the type of person you need to be to be great at this kind of job. Not just anyone can be a carer, you have to be very special and very compassionate, with a real need to make a difference in a person's life. If you are already a carer in a residential home, then moving into live-in care could be an amazing next step for you. Take a look at live-in care and how it could benefit you and those you work with. It could be the best career decision you ever make.
    751 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Find out about an amazing care role you can do that provides great personal benefits, whilst enabling an elderly person to remain in their own home.   Are you looking for the kind of career that makes you feel like you have made a difference in the world? Are you looking for a job that is as challenging as it is rewarding? Would you love to work in the kind of job that enables you to apply your training properly without time constraints or budget issues?   Perhaps it is time to start looking into live-in care.   A live-in carer provides elderly care in the clients home. The level of care provided depends on the support that the client needs. In one job you may be providing basic care and companionship, helping with person tasks and otherwise being on hand for support. In another job you could be accompanying your client whilst they go on holiday, and otherwise provide them with help with personal tasks, gardening, cooking and cleaning. Jobs may be long-term or short-term and you can provide live-in care as part of a rota with another carer (2 weeks on 2 weeks off).   The Benefits For The Client There are many benefits to a client having live-in care. The primary benefit is that they get to live in their own home, rather than moving to a residential home. 97% of people would rather not go into residential care if they become unwell or unable to care for themselves. Receiving care at home means they can stay in the place they love the most. Other benefits include: Companionship - 1.9 million older people in the UK feel ignored or invisible. Having a live-in carer helps to combat loneliness by providing immediate company and supporting mobility and independence. Nutrition and help with cooking Physiotherapy if needed Specialist care for stroke recovery or dementia Safety in the home Peace of mind for the family of the client Being able to stay with a partner Being able to keep a pet   There are many more benefits, and often ones that surprise you with every new client who has their own individual needs for live-in care.   The Benefits For You Being a live-in care is incredibly rewarding and you are making a huge difference to your clients life by supporting them at home. Other benefits of being a live-in carer include:   Saving money on household bills whilst you live in the home of your client Free and frequent training from your live-in care agency Often there is no need for qualifications to get the job (you won't be placed until you have been trained) Great pay The opportunity to travel (in some jobs) A good opportunity to apply the skills you have been taught without time restrictions or budget restrictions   There are many more benefits to being a live-in carer, many of which you find out for yourself during your placements. How To Get A Job In Live-in Care Do some research and have a look at the pay, the type of tasks you will need to do, and the type of person you need to be to be great at this kind of job. Not just anyone can be a carer, you have to be very special and very compassionate, with a real need to make a difference in a person's life. If you are already a carer in a residential home, then moving into live-in care could be an amazing next step for you. Take a look at live-in care and how it could benefit you and those you work with. It could be the best career decision you ever make.
    Aug 06, 2019 751
  • 06 Aug 2019
    In this article we discuss what a carer does so you can see how your relative’s needs can be covered by care from a live-in carer.   Live in care covers a wide range of types of care and exactly what care a particular carer provides will be determined by the needs of their client. Initially the live in care provider will assess the client’s care needs, in conjunction with the family and relevant healthcare professionals, to create a care plan. This plan will detail what care you can expect.   You can find out more at the Live-in Care Hub about types of care offered as there isn’t enough room to go into detail in this article.   Dressing, hair and make-up or shaving A live-in carer can ensure that your relative is appropriately dressed and offer assistance as required, perhaps pulling on socks and shoes or doing up buttons and zips.   Support with personal care and continence If your relative struggles to bath or shower safely or is having issues with continence then a carer can help ensure that they maintain a high degree of personal hygiene. Managing and prompting medication Many older people have complex medication requirements and need help with remembering when to take medication. You can rest assured that your loved one is sticking to the schedule with some help from their carer. Mobility and personal safety Keeping active is important in later life and a live-in carer can help your relative to stay safe around the home, reducing the risk of falls or injuries.  They will also take over answering the door and phone to ensure your relative can’t be scammed or conned and doesn’t feel pressured to rush. Support overnight Live-in carers expect that they will be needed to take their client to the toilet or fetch drinks if they have difficulty getting out of bed, or in ensuring that your loved one doesn’t wander into danger if they become confused and disorientated. Planning, shopping and cooking balanced meals One of the first signs that a relative is struggling is if the find shopping difficult or forget to eat, something a carer will assist with. Light housework, laundry and ironing Running the household is something a live-in carer can help with. They can also assist with personal admin, correspondence and help with day-to-day finances as well as managing appointments, such as GP or hairdresser. Pet care One big benefit of a live-in carer is that your loved one doesn’t need to give up their pet. Trips out of the house A live-in carer can support your loved one to go shopping, attend appointments or go on days out. Many have their own car and are even able to drive your loved one to visit you! Companionship and emotional support It can get lonely if you can’t get out of the house much but a live-in carer can befriend your relative and keep them company. Their presence provides peace of mind for both clients and family members, while allowing your loved one to maintain their dignity and independence during their twilight years.    
    513 Posted by Anna Preston
  • In this article we discuss what a carer does so you can see how your relative’s needs can be covered by care from a live-in carer.   Live in care covers a wide range of types of care and exactly what care a particular carer provides will be determined by the needs of their client. Initially the live in care provider will assess the client’s care needs, in conjunction with the family and relevant healthcare professionals, to create a care plan. This plan will detail what care you can expect.   You can find out more at the Live-in Care Hub about types of care offered as there isn’t enough room to go into detail in this article.   Dressing, hair and make-up or shaving A live-in carer can ensure that your relative is appropriately dressed and offer assistance as required, perhaps pulling on socks and shoes or doing up buttons and zips.   Support with personal care and continence If your relative struggles to bath or shower safely or is having issues with continence then a carer can help ensure that they maintain a high degree of personal hygiene. Managing and prompting medication Many older people have complex medication requirements and need help with remembering when to take medication. You can rest assured that your loved one is sticking to the schedule with some help from their carer. Mobility and personal safety Keeping active is important in later life and a live-in carer can help your relative to stay safe around the home, reducing the risk of falls or injuries.  They will also take over answering the door and phone to ensure your relative can’t be scammed or conned and doesn’t feel pressured to rush. Support overnight Live-in carers expect that they will be needed to take their client to the toilet or fetch drinks if they have difficulty getting out of bed, or in ensuring that your loved one doesn’t wander into danger if they become confused and disorientated. Planning, shopping and cooking balanced meals One of the first signs that a relative is struggling is if the find shopping difficult or forget to eat, something a carer will assist with. Light housework, laundry and ironing Running the household is something a live-in carer can help with. They can also assist with personal admin, correspondence and help with day-to-day finances as well as managing appointments, such as GP or hairdresser. Pet care One big benefit of a live-in carer is that your loved one doesn’t need to give up their pet. Trips out of the house A live-in carer can support your loved one to go shopping, attend appointments or go on days out. Many have their own car and are even able to drive your loved one to visit you! Companionship and emotional support It can get lonely if you can’t get out of the house much but a live-in carer can befriend your relative and keep them company. Their presence provides peace of mind for both clients and family members, while allowing your loved one to maintain their dignity and independence during their twilight years.    
    Aug 06, 2019 513
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Checking on a live-in carer doesn’t need to be as frequent as checking on an elderly relative, but how do you know if you’re visiting them often enough?   When your elderly relative reaches the point of requiring home care you may have already got into a routine of visiting them daily to check up on their well-being and it can seem quite alien to no longer have that responsibility.  Equally, you may feel guilt for not visiting daily and for leaving your loved one in someone else’s hands.   In safe hands All live-in carers go through a rigorous process to ensure that they are trustworthy and capable. Introductory agencies will perform through background checks including following up references and commissioning DBS searches before allowing any carers details to be passed onto families. Full-management agencies will perform equally deep checks, but additionally may provide their own training to ensure that your carer can cope with whatever the placement throws at them.   You can find out more at the live in care hub about what checks a carer is required to undergo before starting work, but what this means in practice is that you can rest assured that your parent or other elderly relation, is going to be cared for professionally and consistently by their carer. How often is too often? A live-in carer is there not just to care for their client but to help the family by taking over the care of their elderly relative. Obviously if you spend as much time at your loved one’s home as you did previously you will achieve nothing other than getting in the way of the carer’s work! Short daily visits are perfectly adequate to check that the carer has no concerns and to keep in touch with your loved one. Depending on what you, the carer and the agency have agreed these visits may be timed to coincide with the carer’s breaks, ensuring 24/7 coverage in care for your relation.   How often is too rare? Trusting your live-in carer is essential to the relationship you have with them – and once they’ve settled in you can find yourself dropping visits and putting off visiting knowing that your loved one is being cared for and happy. It is important that you still keep some kind of visiting schedule. The carer can supervise your loved one’s life but they cannot run it, and there will be many situations in which you will be required to make decisions that will require your personal attention.   How do I know if I’ve got the frequency right? You gut instinct will tell you if you are visiting too often or not often enough. If you seem to be always getting in the way then perhaps you need to visit a little less often. If there always seems to be a lot of things to discuss that have changed since the last time you visited then perhaps you aren’t coming round often enough. The beauty of live-in care is that it can be precisely tailored to the family the carer is working for, so try different frequencies until it feels right.
    613 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Checking on a live-in carer doesn’t need to be as frequent as checking on an elderly relative, but how do you know if you’re visiting them often enough?   When your elderly relative reaches the point of requiring home care you may have already got into a routine of visiting them daily to check up on their well-being and it can seem quite alien to no longer have that responsibility.  Equally, you may feel guilt for not visiting daily and for leaving your loved one in someone else’s hands.   In safe hands All live-in carers go through a rigorous process to ensure that they are trustworthy and capable. Introductory agencies will perform through background checks including following up references and commissioning DBS searches before allowing any carers details to be passed onto families. Full-management agencies will perform equally deep checks, but additionally may provide their own training to ensure that your carer can cope with whatever the placement throws at them.   You can find out more at the live in care hub about what checks a carer is required to undergo before starting work, but what this means in practice is that you can rest assured that your parent or other elderly relation, is going to be cared for professionally and consistently by their carer. How often is too often? A live-in carer is there not just to care for their client but to help the family by taking over the care of their elderly relative. Obviously if you spend as much time at your loved one’s home as you did previously you will achieve nothing other than getting in the way of the carer’s work! Short daily visits are perfectly adequate to check that the carer has no concerns and to keep in touch with your loved one. Depending on what you, the carer and the agency have agreed these visits may be timed to coincide with the carer’s breaks, ensuring 24/7 coverage in care for your relation.   How often is too rare? Trusting your live-in carer is essential to the relationship you have with them – and once they’ve settled in you can find yourself dropping visits and putting off visiting knowing that your loved one is being cared for and happy. It is important that you still keep some kind of visiting schedule. The carer can supervise your loved one’s life but they cannot run it, and there will be many situations in which you will be required to make decisions that will require your personal attention.   How do I know if I’ve got the frequency right? You gut instinct will tell you if you are visiting too often or not often enough. If you seem to be always getting in the way then perhaps you need to visit a little less often. If there always seems to be a lot of things to discuss that have changed since the last time you visited then perhaps you aren’t coming round often enough. The beauty of live-in care is that it can be precisely tailored to the family the carer is working for, so try different frequencies until it feels right.
    Aug 06, 2019 613
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Once you’ve decided that live-in care is best how do you know if a carer is going to get on with your relative?   A live-in carer lives in your loved one’s spare room. That might sound like it’s stating the obvious but it is an important point as it means that your loved one and live-in carer need to be able to get along as they will be spending a lot of time together.   Shared interests Live-in carers provide companionship as well as care. Live-in care agencies have in-depth matchmaking processes which pick out the carers from their list who are most likely to have similar interests and passions to your loved one.   A study by the Live-in Care Hub found the top-ten things carers and their clients like to talk about are:   The elderly person’s personal memories Family The Royal Family The weather Travel Food and drink Classic musicals or musical films such as The Sound of Music Politics Entertainers from the 1940s and 1950s TV series Dad’s Army   Medical needs The other main criteria for matching carers to clients is to ensure that the client’s care and medical needs are met. If your relative is suffering from dementia then a carer with specialist training in supporting dementia sufferers will be required. Carers can also specialise is Parkinson’s, stroke recovery, diabetes management, spinal injuries care and other conditions that need particular expertise.   Different carers bring different outlooks In order to provide a high-quality of 24/7 care live-in carers operate on a rota system with two or three carers working for the same client. The exact rota will depend on the needs of the client. This means there is not one, but two or three different people to be matched to your relative – and it means that your relative has a chance to make not one but two or three new friends. Many clients find it refreshing to have someone interested in the same things that they are, and to be able to discuss different things with different carers.   Sometimes elderly people find new hobbies by having an interest kindled by their carers. Knitting may be too difficult for arthritic fingers, but a comment by one of their carers might give them a new hobby rock painting – even taking the rocks to the local park to be hidden with the support of their new friend.   Not every relationship works Even with the most diligent matchmaking process sometimes two people just don’t get along whatever happens. Perhaps they’re just a little too similar and rub each other up the wrong way. Who knows! If it does turn out that your loved one isn’t getting on with one of their carers then do let your agency know. They will be able to arrange a replacement who, hopefully, will get on with your relative a little bit better. Carers want their clients to be happy and cheerful so they understand if a placement simply isn’t working out the way it should.
    513 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Once you’ve decided that live-in care is best how do you know if a carer is going to get on with your relative?   A live-in carer lives in your loved one’s spare room. That might sound like it’s stating the obvious but it is an important point as it means that your loved one and live-in carer need to be able to get along as they will be spending a lot of time together.   Shared interests Live-in carers provide companionship as well as care. Live-in care agencies have in-depth matchmaking processes which pick out the carers from their list who are most likely to have similar interests and passions to your loved one.   A study by the Live-in Care Hub found the top-ten things carers and their clients like to talk about are:   The elderly person’s personal memories Family The Royal Family The weather Travel Food and drink Classic musicals or musical films such as The Sound of Music Politics Entertainers from the 1940s and 1950s TV series Dad’s Army   Medical needs The other main criteria for matching carers to clients is to ensure that the client’s care and medical needs are met. If your relative is suffering from dementia then a carer with specialist training in supporting dementia sufferers will be required. Carers can also specialise is Parkinson’s, stroke recovery, diabetes management, spinal injuries care and other conditions that need particular expertise.   Different carers bring different outlooks In order to provide a high-quality of 24/7 care live-in carers operate on a rota system with two or three carers working for the same client. The exact rota will depend on the needs of the client. This means there is not one, but two or three different people to be matched to your relative – and it means that your relative has a chance to make not one but two or three new friends. Many clients find it refreshing to have someone interested in the same things that they are, and to be able to discuss different things with different carers.   Sometimes elderly people find new hobbies by having an interest kindled by their carers. Knitting may be too difficult for arthritic fingers, but a comment by one of their carers might give them a new hobby rock painting – even taking the rocks to the local park to be hidden with the support of their new friend.   Not every relationship works Even with the most diligent matchmaking process sometimes two people just don’t get along whatever happens. Perhaps they’re just a little too similar and rub each other up the wrong way. Who knows! If it does turn out that your loved one isn’t getting on with one of their carers then do let your agency know. They will be able to arrange a replacement who, hopefully, will get on with your relative a little bit better. Carers want their clients to be happy and cheerful so they understand if a placement simply isn’t working out the way it should.
    Aug 06, 2019 513
  • 06 Aug 2019
    If you or your loved one has complex medical needs is the only option to move into a nursing home or is live-in care still a possibility?     Life is never straightforward and perhaps nowhere is this more apparent than in how we age. Some people are healthy, active and happy up until their last days while others suffer from multiple conditions, each requiring careful management to ensure a good quality of life.   Research by the Live-in Care hub shows that 70% of respondents thought that their elderly relative might have to go into residential care, yet 97% of people wouldn’t want to move into a care home – even if they were ill or unable to cope on their own.   “Live-in care is just about keeping my Nan company isn’t it?” The discrepancy lies in the way in which people view home carers – especially live-in carers. The public perception is often of low-skilled workers with just enough to training to make a cup of tea and change soiled bedclothes.   The reality couldn’t be further from the dark picture the media likes to paint. Many home care roles are taken by people who have already got experience in caring for the elderly. Some have spent time looking after their own relatives and want to make it a career, while others are trained healthcare professionals who would prefer to work on a one-to-one basis with an individual client or couple.   Live-in carers are supported by their agencies who will organise training courses to cover specific areas of elderly care. It is perfectly possible to employ a live-in carer who has expertise in dementia, Parkinson’s, stroke recovery, or other conditions, and who is continuing to receive updates to their training during the time they are not at the client’s home.   “But Dad needs those injections and he can’t get out of bed on his own. Won’t he be better off in a nursing home?” Carers are trained to help transfer from bed to wheelchair or wheelchair to toilet – that’s part of the service. Usually they will require the use of a hoist as they cannot lift a person single-handedly. Where the use of a hoist isn’t possible then two carers may be required to meet the needs of your father – but that still doesn’t mean he needs to move home!   Most live-in carers are not nurses and therefore cannot perform actual nursing duties such as giving injections or wound dressing. However the local District Nursing team may be able to visit, and some live-in care agencies can provide live-in nursing care – complex needs can be managed at home!   “Won’t it be cheaper in a home? Won’t they have economies of scale?” You may be surprised how cheap live-in care is compared to residential care fees, and those economies of scale can mean quality of life is compromised. For example, 81% of Live-in Care Hub clients say they get the food and drink they want, when they want it, compared to just 52% of nursing home residents and 8% of care residents think they do not get enough to eat and drink!    
    828 Posted by Anna Preston
  • If you or your loved one has complex medical needs is the only option to move into a nursing home or is live-in care still a possibility?     Life is never straightforward and perhaps nowhere is this more apparent than in how we age. Some people are healthy, active and happy up until their last days while others suffer from multiple conditions, each requiring careful management to ensure a good quality of life.   Research by the Live-in Care hub shows that 70% of respondents thought that their elderly relative might have to go into residential care, yet 97% of people wouldn’t want to move into a care home – even if they were ill or unable to cope on their own.   “Live-in care is just about keeping my Nan company isn’t it?” The discrepancy lies in the way in which people view home carers – especially live-in carers. The public perception is often of low-skilled workers with just enough to training to make a cup of tea and change soiled bedclothes.   The reality couldn’t be further from the dark picture the media likes to paint. Many home care roles are taken by people who have already got experience in caring for the elderly. Some have spent time looking after their own relatives and want to make it a career, while others are trained healthcare professionals who would prefer to work on a one-to-one basis with an individual client or couple.   Live-in carers are supported by their agencies who will organise training courses to cover specific areas of elderly care. It is perfectly possible to employ a live-in carer who has expertise in dementia, Parkinson’s, stroke recovery, or other conditions, and who is continuing to receive updates to their training during the time they are not at the client’s home.   “But Dad needs those injections and he can’t get out of bed on his own. Won’t he be better off in a nursing home?” Carers are trained to help transfer from bed to wheelchair or wheelchair to toilet – that’s part of the service. Usually they will require the use of a hoist as they cannot lift a person single-handedly. Where the use of a hoist isn’t possible then two carers may be required to meet the needs of your father – but that still doesn’t mean he needs to move home!   Most live-in carers are not nurses and therefore cannot perform actual nursing duties such as giving injections or wound dressing. However the local District Nursing team may be able to visit, and some live-in care agencies can provide live-in nursing care – complex needs can be managed at home!   “Won’t it be cheaper in a home? Won’t they have economies of scale?” You may be surprised how cheap live-in care is compared to residential care fees, and those economies of scale can mean quality of life is compromised. For example, 81% of Live-in Care Hub clients say they get the food and drink they want, when they want it, compared to just 52% of nursing home residents and 8% of care residents think they do not get enough to eat and drink!    
    Aug 06, 2019 828
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Dementia is a symptom of a number of illnesses characterised by a degradation in brain function. Here are some other facts and figures about the condition.   Research by the live-in care hub shows that dementia is now more feared than cancer. The study found that 34% of all adults fear suffering from the condition in later life, although more than half (52%) are now more comfortable talking about the condition than they were ten years ago.   With the total number of people with dementia set to rise by 38% over the next 15 years it’s vitally important that you talk to your family now, rather than later, about your wishes should dementia strike – especially if there is a family history of the condition.   What is dementia? Dementia is a symptom, not an illness. It can be caused by various illnesses, of which Alzheimer’s is the most common and thus well-known. Other forms include vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies.   The precise direction dementia takes depends on the underlying cause but symptoms may include:   failure to recognise familiar people or situations disorientation mood changes hallucinations, delusions or “living in the past” reduced ability to care for oneself language loss, difficulty following a conversation or television programme memory loss, especially very short term memory   Caring for someone with dementia By 2037 the number of carers will have to have risen to 9 million to cope with rising numbers of sufferers. Currently more than 520,000 people have dementia caused by Alzheimers alone, and around 850,000 people have some form of dementia.   Sufferers of dementia respond well to highly individualised care. One sufferer may be perfectly capable of performing daily tasks – but be unable to look after themselves because their short term memory is so badly affected they cannot finish a task once started. Another may have difficulty with spatial awareness, making moving around their home difficult.   Familiarity can be important to people with dementia, and moving to a care home can be extremely unsettling.  Live in care or homecare services provided by a specialist carer trained in dementia care can be extremely beneficial, allowing the elderly person to maintain a high degree of independence. Keeping active and socialising can be extremely beneficial to people with dementia but it can be difficult for sufferers to do so without support from their family or a live-in carer. Not just a part of ageing Dementia is a specific type of brain damage and not an inevitable part of the ageing process. In fact, around 42,000 people are diagnosed with it before the age of 65. As the disease progresses you will lose your ability to think rationally so it is important to discuss your future with your family as soon as possible. Even if you don’t think there is a problem you should talk to your loved ones so that financial planning can start to support your care in the future. Ensuring that your family is aware of your wishes as regards where you live and who cares for you while you still have full mental capacity will improve your quality of care in the future.
    662 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Dementia is a symptom of a number of illnesses characterised by a degradation in brain function. Here are some other facts and figures about the condition.   Research by the live-in care hub shows that dementia is now more feared than cancer. The study found that 34% of all adults fear suffering from the condition in later life, although more than half (52%) are now more comfortable talking about the condition than they were ten years ago.   With the total number of people with dementia set to rise by 38% over the next 15 years it’s vitally important that you talk to your family now, rather than later, about your wishes should dementia strike – especially if there is a family history of the condition.   What is dementia? Dementia is a symptom, not an illness. It can be caused by various illnesses, of which Alzheimer’s is the most common and thus well-known. Other forms include vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies.   The precise direction dementia takes depends on the underlying cause but symptoms may include:   failure to recognise familiar people or situations disorientation mood changes hallucinations, delusions or “living in the past” reduced ability to care for oneself language loss, difficulty following a conversation or television programme memory loss, especially very short term memory   Caring for someone with dementia By 2037 the number of carers will have to have risen to 9 million to cope with rising numbers of sufferers. Currently more than 520,000 people have dementia caused by Alzheimers alone, and around 850,000 people have some form of dementia.   Sufferers of dementia respond well to highly individualised care. One sufferer may be perfectly capable of performing daily tasks – but be unable to look after themselves because their short term memory is so badly affected they cannot finish a task once started. Another may have difficulty with spatial awareness, making moving around their home difficult.   Familiarity can be important to people with dementia, and moving to a care home can be extremely unsettling.  Live in care or homecare services provided by a specialist carer trained in dementia care can be extremely beneficial, allowing the elderly person to maintain a high degree of independence. Keeping active and socialising can be extremely beneficial to people with dementia but it can be difficult for sufferers to do so without support from their family or a live-in carer. Not just a part of ageing Dementia is a specific type of brain damage and not an inevitable part of the ageing process. In fact, around 42,000 people are diagnosed with it before the age of 65. As the disease progresses you will lose your ability to think rationally so it is important to discuss your future with your family as soon as possible. Even if you don’t think there is a problem you should talk to your loved ones so that financial planning can start to support your care in the future. Ensuring that your family is aware of your wishes as regards where you live and who cares for you while you still have full mental capacity will improve your quality of care in the future.
    Aug 06, 2019 662
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Live-in care is provided on a personal basis – so does that mean you need two carers for a couple? Find out in this article.   When extra care support becomes inevitable it can seem equally inevitable that an elderly couple will need to be split up. While there are care homes that can take a couple spaces are limited and there may be waiting lists. Plus there will be two sets of fees to consider.   Unless both clients have very complex health needs it is usually the case that one home carer can provide care. With only one set of fees the cost is vastly reduced compared to the simple doubling of cost that occurs when you choose a care home. You can find out more at the Live-in Care Hub about fees and agencies.   Care for one, companionship for two Often it is the case that one client needs significantly more care than the other. In some cases, bringing in a carer for the less independent person can reduce the load on the other and improve their independence as they no longer need to be a carer themselves.   A live-in carer of course provides homecare services for elderly people, but is also there for emotional support, and this can be extremely important to the client who has been providing care. Giving them a sympathetic ear to listen to them can significantly improve their mental health and give them a more positive outlook.   Different care needs, same carer It is rare that two people have precisely the same care needs as ageing affects people in different ways. A single live-in carer is able to tailor their service to the precise needs of the couple, cooking food that they both like or taking one to a hairdressers appointment while the other is at a social club. The needs of the couple as a couple can be considered providing a precisely tailored service to meet those needs.   Actually you might need two carers! While you only need to pay one fee for a couple you will probably get to know more than one carer. Carers are people, just like you but with years of experience in caring for the elderly and a significant number of hours of training in specialisms such as dementia, stroke victims or caring for Parkinson’s sufferers. If round the clock care is required then you will usually have a team of two or three carers who will work together on a rota to ensure that your loved ones are always cared for appropriately.   This ensures that your relatives will be cared for in their own home, surrounded by familiar possessions and pets and by people they can get to know and trust fully. You will need to discuss with your live-in care agency exactly how many carers will be on the rota, and for how long each will be staying with your family as it will depend on many factors such as how much support is needed overnight, and whether you are still intending to provide care during the day to allow the live-in carer a daily break from their duties.  
    565 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Live-in care is provided on a personal basis – so does that mean you need two carers for a couple? Find out in this article.   When extra care support becomes inevitable it can seem equally inevitable that an elderly couple will need to be split up. While there are care homes that can take a couple spaces are limited and there may be waiting lists. Plus there will be two sets of fees to consider.   Unless both clients have very complex health needs it is usually the case that one home carer can provide care. With only one set of fees the cost is vastly reduced compared to the simple doubling of cost that occurs when you choose a care home. You can find out more at the Live-in Care Hub about fees and agencies.   Care for one, companionship for two Often it is the case that one client needs significantly more care than the other. In some cases, bringing in a carer for the less independent person can reduce the load on the other and improve their independence as they no longer need to be a carer themselves.   A live-in carer of course provides homecare services for elderly people, but is also there for emotional support, and this can be extremely important to the client who has been providing care. Giving them a sympathetic ear to listen to them can significantly improve their mental health and give them a more positive outlook.   Different care needs, same carer It is rare that two people have precisely the same care needs as ageing affects people in different ways. A single live-in carer is able to tailor their service to the precise needs of the couple, cooking food that they both like or taking one to a hairdressers appointment while the other is at a social club. The needs of the couple as a couple can be considered providing a precisely tailored service to meet those needs.   Actually you might need two carers! While you only need to pay one fee for a couple you will probably get to know more than one carer. Carers are people, just like you but with years of experience in caring for the elderly and a significant number of hours of training in specialisms such as dementia, stroke victims or caring for Parkinson’s sufferers. If round the clock care is required then you will usually have a team of two or three carers who will work together on a rota to ensure that your loved ones are always cared for appropriately.   This ensures that your relatives will be cared for in their own home, surrounded by familiar possessions and pets and by people they can get to know and trust fully. You will need to discuss with your live-in care agency exactly how many carers will be on the rota, and for how long each will be staying with your family as it will depend on many factors such as how much support is needed overnight, and whether you are still intending to provide care during the day to allow the live-in carer a daily break from their duties.  
    Aug 06, 2019 565
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Slowing down is a natural part of ageing – so how do you know the difference between what’s normal and when there’s a real issue with mobility?   Getting old inevitably means muscles and joints don’t work as well as they used to. It’s natural to take longer to walk to the shops, or to find carrying the shopping back again a little harder. One of the best ways to avoid mobility issues is to keep active for as long as possible, which can also help improve mental health and help retain independence, but sometimes nature has other ideas and conditions such as arthritis, rheumatism, heart disease and obesity can make moving around difficult. Causes of mobility problems According to Live-in Care Hub one of the biggest causes of mobility problems is falling. Falls can result in broken bones, more common in the elderly as bone density decreases with age, and loss of confidence which in turn can reduce mobility and compound the problem. Even minor slips and stumbles can shake an elderly person’s confidence in themselves.   Heart disease can be another reason older people don’t move around as much. If activity brings on angina, breathlessness or a racing pulse the sufferer may start to be less mobile, especially out of the home.   Obesity can sometimes cause issues with mobility, with fat deposits making it harder for muscles to work. Not all obesity is caused simply by poor diet – diabetes, a common complaint in later years, can make the body stockpile fat reserves. Signs to look out for Mobility problems can occur instantly – as the result of a fall for example, or can gradually become apparent. If you are caring for an elderly person it can be important to take time regularly to assess their  needs, and arrange the appropriate homecare services  to support their independence. Signs to watch out for include: taking longer to answer the door a lack of fresh food in the house not seeing friends or attending clubs for several days, missing appointments standards of housework or tidiness deteriorating finding it harder to stand up or sitting down unsteadily having difficulties with stairs, even just in one direction finding it hard to balance when walking, appearing unsteady   What should I do if I notice a problem? Mobility issues can lead to reduced mobility which can lead to further mobility problems. It is important that the issue is brought to the attention of the doctor caring for the elderly person. Some medications can cause balance problems, and if the symptoms are identified the dose can be altered or medication changed to avoid the problem getting worse. Encouraging movement can help strengthen muscles and improve balance. Suggest a walk in the garden or park. A good way to get exercise is to go swimming or attend an aquafit class – some areas have specialist sessions for older swimmers where the water is warmer and the atmosphere is calmer. Ensure trip hazards are removed from the home to guard against falls. Dementia sufferers can have problems with spatial awareness to make sure you keep doors clear and take up rugs.  
    535 Posted by Anna Preston
  • Slowing down is a natural part of ageing – so how do you know the difference between what’s normal and when there’s a real issue with mobility?   Getting old inevitably means muscles and joints don’t work as well as they used to. It’s natural to take longer to walk to the shops, or to find carrying the shopping back again a little harder. One of the best ways to avoid mobility issues is to keep active for as long as possible, which can also help improve mental health and help retain independence, but sometimes nature has other ideas and conditions such as arthritis, rheumatism, heart disease and obesity can make moving around difficult. Causes of mobility problems According to Live-in Care Hub one of the biggest causes of mobility problems is falling. Falls can result in broken bones, more common in the elderly as bone density decreases with age, and loss of confidence which in turn can reduce mobility and compound the problem. Even minor slips and stumbles can shake an elderly person’s confidence in themselves.   Heart disease can be another reason older people don’t move around as much. If activity brings on angina, breathlessness or a racing pulse the sufferer may start to be less mobile, especially out of the home.   Obesity can sometimes cause issues with mobility, with fat deposits making it harder for muscles to work. Not all obesity is caused simply by poor diet – diabetes, a common complaint in later years, can make the body stockpile fat reserves. Signs to look out for Mobility problems can occur instantly – as the result of a fall for example, or can gradually become apparent. If you are caring for an elderly person it can be important to take time regularly to assess their  needs, and arrange the appropriate homecare services  to support their independence. Signs to watch out for include: taking longer to answer the door a lack of fresh food in the house not seeing friends or attending clubs for several days, missing appointments standards of housework or tidiness deteriorating finding it harder to stand up or sitting down unsteadily having difficulties with stairs, even just in one direction finding it hard to balance when walking, appearing unsteady   What should I do if I notice a problem? Mobility issues can lead to reduced mobility which can lead to further mobility problems. It is important that the issue is brought to the attention of the doctor caring for the elderly person. Some medications can cause balance problems, and if the symptoms are identified the dose can be altered or medication changed to avoid the problem getting worse. Encouraging movement can help strengthen muscles and improve balance. Suggest a walk in the garden or park. A good way to get exercise is to go swimming or attend an aquafit class – some areas have specialist sessions for older swimmers where the water is warmer and the atmosphere is calmer. Ensure trip hazards are removed from the home to guard against falls. Dementia sufferers can have problems with spatial awareness to make sure you keep doors clear and take up rugs.  
    Aug 06, 2019 535

Most Viewed Blogs/Articles From This Author

  • 13 Aug 2019
    Find out about the nutritional needs you may have as somebody with less mobility and how to achieve new nutritional goals for optimum health.   Making and preparing meals when you have issues with arthritis or other mobility problems can be very challenging. The simple act of slicing a cucumber, opening a jar or even just making some toast can be very difficult and as a result your nutrition can suffer. 1 million adults aged 65 or over in the UK are malnourished or at risk of malnourishment and many of those people may struggle because of issues with mobility. Adversely, the right nutrition is very important for anyone but particularly those who are less mobile. As we age our nutritional needs change and a big challenge can be getting the right nutrients on fewer calories and ensuring we don't consume too many calories. If you are less mobile the already present challenge of nutrition becomes even more challenging. Here are some tips to help you maintain your nutrition if you are less mobile:   Count Your Calories If you move less you require fewer calories. It is important for you to count your calories and ensure you are getting the right nutrition from the smaller amount of food you are consuming. It can be challenging to do this but so important as weight gain is only going to cause further issues with mobility and increase your risk of obesity related diseases like Type 2 Diabetes.   Consider Some Help At Home The Live-in Care Hub completed a study that found that most people would prefer to avoid residential care if they are unwell or unable to care for themselves and residential care might not even be appropriate for you if you simply need some help with basic tasks. The same study showed that somebody who has live-in care is much more likely to enjoy the food and drink they want, than someone within residential care. Home care services can be really useful to help with shopping and cooking nutritious meals for you. Home care services can also help maximise your mobility and help you stay as independent as possible.   Pack In The Protein For the elderly and those who are less mobile protein is so important. When you don't get enough protein in your diet you lose body fat, lean mass and muscle and you can't maintain the strength you currently have let alone build more strength. So, you could even be limiting your ability to improve mobility just by not eating enough protein. Some great protein sources  are eggs, lean meat and legumes.   Maintain Good Bone Health Falls can be really tricky injuries to recover from as you age, so it is important to keep your bones as strong as possible with exercise and diet. Although calcium is important when it comes to your bone health, a good variety of fruits and vegetables is also important.     It is important that you seek specific advice for good nutrition to ensure that your health and vitality is optimum as you age. With changing nutritional needs as we get older some simple tweeks can make a huge difference. The right diet changes and support could even boost your mobility, if not maintain it along with good levels of health, for an active and healthy later life.
    857 Posted by Anna Preston
  • 06 Aug 2019
    If you or your loved one has complex medical needs is the only option to move into a nursing home or is live-in care still a possibility?     Life is never straightforward and perhaps nowhere is this more apparent than in how we age. Some people are healthy, active and happy up until their last days while others suffer from multiple conditions, each requiring careful management to ensure a good quality of life.   Research by the Live-in Care hub shows that 70% of respondents thought that their elderly relative might have to go into residential care, yet 97% of people wouldn’t want to move into a care home – even if they were ill or unable to cope on their own.   “Live-in care is just about keeping my Nan company isn’t it?” The discrepancy lies in the way in which people view home carers – especially live-in carers. The public perception is often of low-skilled workers with just enough to training to make a cup of tea and change soiled bedclothes.   The reality couldn’t be further from the dark picture the media likes to paint. Many home care roles are taken by people who have already got experience in caring for the elderly. Some have spent time looking after their own relatives and want to make it a career, while others are trained healthcare professionals who would prefer to work on a one-to-one basis with an individual client or couple.   Live-in carers are supported by their agencies who will organise training courses to cover specific areas of elderly care. It is perfectly possible to employ a live-in carer who has expertise in dementia, Parkinson’s, stroke recovery, or other conditions, and who is continuing to receive updates to their training during the time they are not at the client’s home.   “But Dad needs those injections and he can’t get out of bed on his own. Won’t he be better off in a nursing home?” Carers are trained to help transfer from bed to wheelchair or wheelchair to toilet – that’s part of the service. Usually they will require the use of a hoist as they cannot lift a person single-handedly. Where the use of a hoist isn’t possible then two carers may be required to meet the needs of your father – but that still doesn’t mean he needs to move home!   Most live-in carers are not nurses and therefore cannot perform actual nursing duties such as giving injections or wound dressing. However the local District Nursing team may be able to visit, and some live-in care agencies can provide live-in nursing care – complex needs can be managed at home!   “Won’t it be cheaper in a home? Won’t they have economies of scale?” You may be surprised how cheap live-in care is compared to residential care fees, and those economies of scale can mean quality of life is compromised. For example, 81% of Live-in Care Hub clients say they get the food and drink they want, when they want it, compared to just 52% of nursing home residents and 8% of care residents think they do not get enough to eat and drink!    
    828 Posted by Anna Preston
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Information and resources explaining how much you could get paid if you want to take on the rewarding job of a live-in carer.   In the UK our ageing population is getting much bigger fairly quickly. It is thought that within the next 26 years, a quarter of the population will be aged 65 and over. With that increase in the need for care, means there is a huge need for additional carers within the care industry. Elderly care homes always need additional staff but the biggest demand in care jobs comes from the care at home sector. Care worker jobs are in high demand when it comes to live-in care and home care services because it is now coming to light that care in the home is a really beneficial form of care all round.   Aside from the fact most people don't want to go into residential care, elderly care homes can't keep up with demand. The NHS is also struggling as there is an increase in elderly patients with nowhere to place them when they are well enough to leave the hospital. With live-in care, the benefits are spread to everyone. The client is happy remaining at home and the costs can compare favourably to residential care. There's also no need to move area or wait for a place in a local care home. The NHS benefits too because it doesn't have so many beds taken up with elderly patients, and live-in carers can enjoy a fulfilling and rewarding job where they are able to apply the care they were trained to give. Live-in Care Work: An Overview If you are thinking of looking into live-in care worker jobs, or applying to a live-in care agency, you will want to know the basics of what the job involves. Firstly, you should know that although it does mean you live with the client, it doesn't mean you have to be on call constantly. You are entitled to breaks and private time, and you often share your job with another carer. Usually you will work for two weeks and then swap with another carer for two weeks.   You will also have your own private room and that room is checked for suitability by the live-in care agency who will be your main employers. The agency will also train you and support you in any help or advice you need in your job role. You may be required to provide a number of different services including: personal care, cooking, cleaning, help with mobility, help with medication timetables, gardening, pet care and accompaniment to appointments.   You may also need to provide specialist care such as dementia support. You will not be placed on any jobs without the qualifications or training to complete what is needed, and you will be able to let us know which services you would prefer not to provide. How Much Do Live-in Carers Get Paid? The amount you are paid depends on lots of factors such as your previous experience, training, specialities, hours worked and the range of services you provide to the client. A very rough guide is between £300 and £600 pounds per week but the amount can vary hugely depending on each job.   Usually you will get paid every month and you will be entitled to sick pay and holiday pay too. Look Into Live-in Care Worker Jobs Today Live-in care worker jobs are on offer right now from various live-in care agencies across the country. There is a lot of work on offer, and with the right initial ingredients, you don't usually need a high education or lots of previous experience and training to gain employment. A good live-in care agency will provide you with all the training you need. Why not look into care worker jobs today? It could be your first step towards gaining the kind of compassionate job you always hoped you'd be able to do.  
    783 Posted by Anna Preston
  • 07 Aug 2019
    Is it time to move on from the care home job? Take a look at three signs that it time for a change of scene. Working as a care worker in a care home can be rewarding. Getting to know your patients and their families, helping them to live their life to the full leaves you with a great feeling. But when you no longer feel like you are making a difference or have grown tired of the same routine, maybe it’s time to move to pastures new. 1 When there are limited or no professional development opportunities Some care homes provide a schedule of training for their care workers, improving and building on the skill set of their staff so that residents and patients are provided with the best quality service. Inevitably, this schedule of training and development will be guided by two things: what the care sector regulations say they have to provide and what they the care home management want to be able to provide their residents. If your care career and your own desires for professional development are not being met, you can feel stuck and unchallenged. 2 It’s unsustainable There comes a time when the routine and shift pattern you have ‘always done’ or are always expected to do becomes unsustainable. For example, if the care home staffing rota seems to be in the perpetual state of being understaffed, you will always be asked to do more in terms of shifts and hours. This isn’t something you can or want to sustain. There is also the issue of pay to consider too. Anyone seeking their fortune in care work will be sorely disappointed but low-levels of pay is not something that you can sustain either. There are care work paths that do pay well, such as live-in care work that is also rewarding in terms of the difference it makes to the lives of the person you live with and care for. Here is a good explanation of live-in care if you want to know more. 3 Something better comes along There is a saying that once you are in a role, you should be looking for your next. Today’s generation of workers is no longer prepared to stay in the same role for decades. As a care worker in a care home, there is nothing to say that you too cannot keep looking for a new role in care work that provides new challenges and opportunities for you. When it comes to the care sector, it is not only one of the most diverse industries but also one of the most fast-paced too. The way we offer care to people is changing because it has to. The care that older people want is changing because they want as many different care options as possible. What this means is that there has never been a better time to work in a care setting but that doesn’t mean staying at a care home. Is it time you moved to pastures new?
    764 Posted by Anna Preston

Categories This Author Writes About

View all blogs from everyone