Ivan Serrano 's Entries

1 blog
  • 02 Jul 2018
    When you think about it, most of our life is spent waiting; for the coffee to brew, for the train to arrive, or the operator to get back on the phone. As a business, influencing attitudes in other during this period is helpful with regards to how you want them to perceive a brand. For the most part, when we’re on hold, there are perhaps advertisements about the brand running and, after waiting for longer than 10 minutes, it can begin to wear down a customer or client. What other options are there to keep customers engaged? The first step is perhaps counterintuitive to others; discourage the calling of a customer care operator. Consider a person calling a Drug and Cosmetic Regulatory Consultants firm customer care operative wanting to know what the need to engage the company in their services. It is likely that the information they need is on the website. When the person is on hold, an ad pointing the caller to an FAQ page could run. Should the nature of their query be mentioned, they are likely to hang up and look at the information suggested. For this approach to work, the emphasis on saving time (what all customers wish to do), should be capitalized upon for the strategy to be an effective one. Running a campaign for a self-service support system is another way to engage customers instead of keeping them waiting. To encourage the use, you can set up a reward system for using the service. Depending on the business, it can take various forms. An airline that has a travel blog can reward those using the platform by sending customized emails on new deals before the general public gets their hands on the same. For a mobile phone service provider, they can give loyalty points redeemable for various services or items. For email queries, surveys can be used to let the customer have their say as well as gather much-needed customer research. For their time, rewards or loyalty points can let them know that spending the time to answer the questions was worthwhile. Advertisements are also an alternative to advertising current products that the client may not know about. These can be at the bottom of the email signature.   Depending on the nature of your business, you can introduce humor into the waiting period. That can be in the form of funny videos or sketches that depict your company or product in a different light. It helps to have something funny to lighten the mood of customers who, typically, do not enjoy waiting. Especially if they are frustrated, having the content will give the customer service person an easier time when they do come round to talking to the customer. Whatever you choose, the idea is to make the waiting period easier on the clients.
    722 Posted by Ivan Serrano
  • When you think about it, most of our life is spent waiting; for the coffee to brew, for the train to arrive, or the operator to get back on the phone. As a business, influencing attitudes in other during this period is helpful with regards to how you want them to perceive a brand. For the most part, when we’re on hold, there are perhaps advertisements about the brand running and, after waiting for longer than 10 minutes, it can begin to wear down a customer or client. What other options are there to keep customers engaged? The first step is perhaps counterintuitive to others; discourage the calling of a customer care operator. Consider a person calling a Drug and Cosmetic Regulatory Consultants firm customer care operative wanting to know what the need to engage the company in their services. It is likely that the information they need is on the website. When the person is on hold, an ad pointing the caller to an FAQ page could run. Should the nature of their query be mentioned, they are likely to hang up and look at the information suggested. For this approach to work, the emphasis on saving time (what all customers wish to do), should be capitalized upon for the strategy to be an effective one. Running a campaign for a self-service support system is another way to engage customers instead of keeping them waiting. To encourage the use, you can set up a reward system for using the service. Depending on the business, it can take various forms. An airline that has a travel blog can reward those using the platform by sending customized emails on new deals before the general public gets their hands on the same. For a mobile phone service provider, they can give loyalty points redeemable for various services or items. For email queries, surveys can be used to let the customer have their say as well as gather much-needed customer research. For their time, rewards or loyalty points can let them know that spending the time to answer the questions was worthwhile. Advertisements are also an alternative to advertising current products that the client may not know about. These can be at the bottom of the email signature.   Depending on the nature of your business, you can introduce humor into the waiting period. That can be in the form of funny videos or sketches that depict your company or product in a different light. It helps to have something funny to lighten the mood of customers who, typically, do not enjoy waiting. Especially if they are frustrated, having the content will give the customer service person an easier time when they do come round to talking to the customer. Whatever you choose, the idea is to make the waiting period easier on the clients.
    Jul 02, 2018 722