James Green 's Entries

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  • 29 Dec 2019
    Almost every major civilization on Earth has a reference to the lost city of Atlantis somewhere within its ancient texts. It's recorded on official documents and even mentioned in the scriptures of some religions. In every case, the story is the same: It was a mighty city, and possibly even a world leader in trade, commerce, and culture, but one day it was sunk beneath a mighty wave and never returned. The people and buildings of Atlantis were lost forever, and the whole city was buried at the bottom of the sea. Given the number of ancient texts that refer to it, it's nothing short of astonishing that we haven't found Atlantis yet. We don't even know if there's an Atlantis to find at all - it's possible that it all started with one fantastical tale, and all the other stories and records are based on repetitions of that myth. There are many historians and experts who have concluded that it's never been anything more than a legend, but there are just as many who believe that the legend is rooted in reality and that the remains of Atlantis are still out there somewhere if we just knew where to look. Even after so many years and so little evidence, the Atlantis name still inspires the imagination and attracts wonder. It also attracts money; the Atlantis: City of Destiny online slots game is just one of many online slots that use the mythology of the sunken city to part players from their money. Even if you added up all the money that's been spent on the Atlantis-inspired online slots games, it would just be a drop in the ocean (if you'll excuse the pun) compared to the huge sum of cash raked in by Disney's 'Atlantis: The Lost Empire' movie. Whether it's films or slots game on website like Dove Casino, there's money to be made on the back of the Atlantis story, and for as long as that remains the case, people will carry on looking for it. Could it be possible that we've already found it, though? Could the story of Atlantis be based on any of the real-life locations we're about to show you? Thera The story of Atlantis is widely considered to be a Greek myth, so in and around Greece might be the best place to start looking for it. If we did so, we’d have to give careful consideration to Thera, an island that met with sudden destruction just as Atlantis does in the famous tale. There’s a crucial difference, though. Atlantis was drowned. Thera was buried under a volcanic eruption during the Bronze Age, suffering a similar fate to the Italian city of Pompeii. Nor was it lost forever - Santorini was built right on top of its ruins. Everything that once existed on Thera was gone, though, and could either be a misinterpretation on Plato’s part or a mistranslation of Plato’s original records that led to the ‘flood’ version of the story becoming widespread. There are archaeologists attempting to excavate parts of Thera as we speak, so we might learn more about this in the near future. Spain Many researchers from the United States of America have dedicated years of their lives to trying to locate Atlantis, and they've cast their net far and wide. Spain seems too far away from Plato's field of observation to be the right location for Atlantis, but there certainly appears to be something interesting in the sea close to its coast. Satellite imagery of the sea bed near Cadiz, close to Spain's south coast, has shown evidence of large human-made structures below the sea there. According to Richard Freund, who is the head researcher on the team responsible for the possible discovery, the undersea city has been almost totally flattened - a phenomenon that he believes is consistent with the impact of an enormous tsunami. Freund also excitedly points to several similarly-designed ancient towns and villages near to Cadiz, because he claims they were made in the image of Atlantis as a tribute to the lost city. More evidence will be required to prove his claim, but he could be on to something. Cyprus The tale of the Cypriot candidate for Atlantis has gone cold in recent years, but we shouldn't discount it as a possibility. Way back in 2004, another American research team led by Robert Sarmast was one hundred percent positive that they'd found the remains of Atlantis under the sea close to Cyprus. Could it be that Cyprus once had another companion island? If the sonar scans are to be believed, it might have done. The sonar shows a hill which bears a striking similarity to the 'Acropolis Hill' described by Plato, and upon that hill are two long, straight walls. Sarmast believes the walls are too perfectly straight to have been designed by nature, as the dimensions are too perfect. These could be the hills that the fabled temples of Atlantis once stood upon. At the time, Sarmast intended to go back and conduct further research, but it appears that he never did. If anything, that adds to the sense of mystery! Gibraltar As an island, Gibraltar is another location that's a prime candidate to have been close to or connected to Atlantis - and now there's some evidence that it may have been. As recently as 2017, stone anchors were pulled out of the sea in the Strait of Gibraltar. Atlantis is said to have been a port city, and so the ancient anchor could have come from ships and boats that were in its harbor when disaster struck. No less than six of the 5,000-year-old anchors have been found in a part of the Strait, which was known back in Plato's time as the Pillar of Hercules. Although interpretations vary, there are some who believe that the Pillar of Hercules is precisely where Plato specified that Atlantis could be found. At the very least, there's evidence of a Bronze Age harbor below the waves there that was once presumably very large but is now completely submerged.   Could Atlantis be in any of the locations above? Have we already found it and completely overlooked it? Or is it just a case of the myth being nothing more than folklore, and there’s no truth to be found? We may find out soon, or we might never find out at all. In the meantime, at least we can all carry on watching the films and playing the online slots.
    69 Posted by James Green
  • Almost every major civilization on Earth has a reference to the lost city of Atlantis somewhere within its ancient texts. It's recorded on official documents and even mentioned in the scriptures of some religions. In every case, the story is the same: It was a mighty city, and possibly even a world leader in trade, commerce, and culture, but one day it was sunk beneath a mighty wave and never returned. The people and buildings of Atlantis were lost forever, and the whole city was buried at the bottom of the sea. Given the number of ancient texts that refer to it, it's nothing short of astonishing that we haven't found Atlantis yet. We don't even know if there's an Atlantis to find at all - it's possible that it all started with one fantastical tale, and all the other stories and records are based on repetitions of that myth. There are many historians and experts who have concluded that it's never been anything more than a legend, but there are just as many who believe that the legend is rooted in reality and that the remains of Atlantis are still out there somewhere if we just knew where to look. Even after so many years and so little evidence, the Atlantis name still inspires the imagination and attracts wonder. It also attracts money; the Atlantis: City of Destiny online slots game is just one of many online slots that use the mythology of the sunken city to part players from their money. Even if you added up all the money that's been spent on the Atlantis-inspired online slots games, it would just be a drop in the ocean (if you'll excuse the pun) compared to the huge sum of cash raked in by Disney's 'Atlantis: The Lost Empire' movie. Whether it's films or slots game on website like Dove Casino, there's money to be made on the back of the Atlantis story, and for as long as that remains the case, people will carry on looking for it. Could it be possible that we've already found it, though? Could the story of Atlantis be based on any of the real-life locations we're about to show you? Thera The story of Atlantis is widely considered to be a Greek myth, so in and around Greece might be the best place to start looking for it. If we did so, we’d have to give careful consideration to Thera, an island that met with sudden destruction just as Atlantis does in the famous tale. There’s a crucial difference, though. Atlantis was drowned. Thera was buried under a volcanic eruption during the Bronze Age, suffering a similar fate to the Italian city of Pompeii. Nor was it lost forever - Santorini was built right on top of its ruins. Everything that once existed on Thera was gone, though, and could either be a misinterpretation on Plato’s part or a mistranslation of Plato’s original records that led to the ‘flood’ version of the story becoming widespread. There are archaeologists attempting to excavate parts of Thera as we speak, so we might learn more about this in the near future. Spain Many researchers from the United States of America have dedicated years of their lives to trying to locate Atlantis, and they've cast their net far and wide. Spain seems too far away from Plato's field of observation to be the right location for Atlantis, but there certainly appears to be something interesting in the sea close to its coast. Satellite imagery of the sea bed near Cadiz, close to Spain's south coast, has shown evidence of large human-made structures below the sea there. According to Richard Freund, who is the head researcher on the team responsible for the possible discovery, the undersea city has been almost totally flattened - a phenomenon that he believes is consistent with the impact of an enormous tsunami. Freund also excitedly points to several similarly-designed ancient towns and villages near to Cadiz, because he claims they were made in the image of Atlantis as a tribute to the lost city. More evidence will be required to prove his claim, but he could be on to something. Cyprus The tale of the Cypriot candidate for Atlantis has gone cold in recent years, but we shouldn't discount it as a possibility. Way back in 2004, another American research team led by Robert Sarmast was one hundred percent positive that they'd found the remains of Atlantis under the sea close to Cyprus. Could it be that Cyprus once had another companion island? If the sonar scans are to be believed, it might have done. The sonar shows a hill which bears a striking similarity to the 'Acropolis Hill' described by Plato, and upon that hill are two long, straight walls. Sarmast believes the walls are too perfectly straight to have been designed by nature, as the dimensions are too perfect. These could be the hills that the fabled temples of Atlantis once stood upon. At the time, Sarmast intended to go back and conduct further research, but it appears that he never did. If anything, that adds to the sense of mystery! Gibraltar As an island, Gibraltar is another location that's a prime candidate to have been close to or connected to Atlantis - and now there's some evidence that it may have been. As recently as 2017, stone anchors were pulled out of the sea in the Strait of Gibraltar. Atlantis is said to have been a port city, and so the ancient anchor could have come from ships and boats that were in its harbor when disaster struck. No less than six of the 5,000-year-old anchors have been found in a part of the Strait, which was known back in Plato's time as the Pillar of Hercules. Although interpretations vary, there are some who believe that the Pillar of Hercules is precisely where Plato specified that Atlantis could be found. At the very least, there's evidence of a Bronze Age harbor below the waves there that was once presumably very large but is now completely submerged.   Could Atlantis be in any of the locations above? Have we already found it and completely overlooked it? Or is it just a case of the myth being nothing more than folklore, and there’s no truth to be found? We may find out soon, or we might never find out at all. In the meantime, at least we can all carry on watching the films and playing the online slots.
    Dec 29, 2019 69