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People Skills 614 views Sep 18, 2018
Getai veteran Wang Lei's storied life to be told in Web series

Entertainer Wang Lei started working at a young age to support the family. His father was a drunk who beat his mother. Wang later gambled and got heavily into debt. Today, he is a respected getai veteran who also acts in movies.  인터넷카지노

His storied life is the stuff of dramas. And now it is.

Wang, 57, will star in Lu Bian Ge Wang (When The Night Falls - The Story Of Wang Lei), a 10-part Hokkien and Mandarin series based on his life which debuts on the streaming platform Toggle on Aug 30. The series by film-maker Jack Neo's J Team Productions is directed and scripted by Ivan Ho, who co-wrote the hit movie Ah Boys To Men 3: Frogmen (2015).

The show was launched at a celebration of his 20 years in getai at Good Chance Popiah on Aug 24.

Turning up to support him were fellow getai artists as well as his family, including his wife, Madam Florence Cheng, 57, who has stood by him through thick and thin.

With her standing next to him, he said: "I'm really sorry that when we had a family, I sold off our first flat in Woodlands after losing everything. Secondly, we've been married for over 30 years but we don't have wedding rings because I lost those as well. Sorry once again."

 

At one point, he lost more than $200,000 and was left with only the air-conditioner at home.

Wang choked up at this point. He then added: "After letting her suffer for so many years, I just want her to enjoy life these few years."

Neo, 58, was also at the event. Wang calls him his benefactor as it was the director who gave him his break into film. 인터넷바카라

Wang had no lines in his first two movies and so he left the script for horror comedy Where Got Ghost? (2009) at home, until his son pointed out his character had plenty of dialogue.

He said: "I studied it all and memorised it thoroughly, and then on the day of filming, the director changed everything."

Filming a series based on his own life was quite an emotional experience and Wang said that he "cried a few times, especially thinking of how tough life was for my mother".

Asked if he had wanted to withhold anything from the screen, he told The Straits Times: "Everyone knows and I'm not afraid of how people will look at me. Everyday, I'm counselling people on Facebook on how to overcome gambling."

Lu Bian Ge Wang (When The Night Falls - The Story Of Wang Lei) debuts on the streaming platform Toggle on Aug 30.

 


Jake Kennedy 's Entries

135 blogs
  • 12 Sep 2018
    I hesitated for the longest time over whether to watch Nirvana In Fire II. 바카라사이트주소 And that is because Nirvana In Fire (2015) was so good. The Chinese period drama about a frail strategist, Su Zhe/Lin Shu, who seeks justice for his framed family, was a riveting game of thrones. He had to keep 10 steps ahead of everyone else because a wrong move would mean exposure and death. It was a critical and popular hit and boosted the careers of its stars Hu Ge and Wang Kai. What are the chances of a sequel measuring up when the characters and actors are different? It turns out that Nirvana In Fire II is a most worthy successor. Other than the change in cast, the behind-the-scenes talent has returned, from directors Kong Sheng and Li Xue to writer Hai Yan, whose Web novel of the same name was the basis of the first series. So quality-wise, there is definitely a sense of continuity. There is that same satisfyingly cerebral approach to the storytelling in the way characters analyse things: Who might have done this? What is at stake? What is the most advantageous move to make? But Nirvana In Fire II is also its own animal. 안전놀이터 It takes place after the events of the earlier show and is set during the tumultuous period of the northern and southern dynasties in the sixth century. The Changlin army defends the Liang Dynasty's northern frontier and is led by Xiao Tingsheng (Sun Chun) and his son Xiao Pingzhang (Huang Xiaoming); younger son Pingjing (Liu Haoran) wants to be a carefree wanderer. They have the trust of the emperor, but others at court are wary of the power wielded by the house of Changlin. The story begins with Pingzhang holding down the fort in the north and in desperate need of supplies - but the ships never make it. After the battle, Pingjing sets out to investigate the sinking of the vessels. The opening arc sets in motion court rivalry and intrigue with ideas of loyalty and sacrifice. Add to the mix an ailing emperor, an insecure empress, a young crown prince and things become even more fraught. A-list actor Huang brings gravitas and intelligence to the role of Pingzhang and there is warmth and even moments of humour in interactions with his younger brother and his wife, played by Tong Liya from 2015's comedy mystery Detective Chinatown. Relative newcomer Liu, 20, more than holds his own playing a mischievous and good-hearted young man who learns that the world can be a treacherous place. 바카라사이트 Pacing wise, Nirvana In Fire II unfolds at a more stately pace. It is not until about one-third into the 50 episodes that we get a glimpse into why the empress' spiritual adviser Puyang Ying (the silkily villainous Guo Jingfei) is nefariously scheming away. The sequel is more of a slow burn, but it remains compelling. The show of strength by Chinese television shows in recent years is not just in scripted dramas, but also in variety programmes. They have a wide range of absorbing formats plus the draw of top celebrities. On a recent holiday in Beijing, I found myself glued to the quiz show Who's Still Standing?; the creative music programme PhantaCity, featuring the still-luminous Faye Wong; and Chinese Restaurant, a reality show about celebrities running an eatery in a foreign land. Incidentally, Huang had appeared in the first season of Chinese Restaurant (2017), which was set in Thailand's Ko Chang. In the second season, actresses Zhao Wei and Shu Qi, singer-actor Alec Su, TFBoys' leader Karry Wang and singer Bai Jugang set up shop in the picturesque town of Colmar in France. It's fun seeing the stars interacting with one another and finding out who can cook. Shu often plays sexy on screen, but Bai calls her "Qi ge", or brother Qi, and it's like she's one of the guys. And despite his young age, Wang, 18, is most assured in the kitchen. There is also some drama in the form of problems, such as the language barrier and an unexpectedly heavy storm that lashes down. It comes as something of a jolt to realise that Zhao and Su were co-stars on My Fair Princess in 1998, the period comedy drama that turned her into a star. And there's a touching reunion when actor Zhang Tielin, who played the Qianlong emperor in the show, makes an imperious guest appearance here.
    620 Posted by Jake Kennedy
  • I hesitated for the longest time over whether to watch Nirvana In Fire II. 바카라사이트주소 And that is because Nirvana In Fire (2015) was so good. The Chinese period drama about a frail strategist, Su Zhe/Lin Shu, who seeks justice for his framed family, was a riveting game of thrones. He had to keep 10 steps ahead of everyone else because a wrong move would mean exposure and death. It was a critical and popular hit and boosted the careers of its stars Hu Ge and Wang Kai. What are the chances of a sequel measuring up when the characters and actors are different? It turns out that Nirvana In Fire II is a most worthy successor. Other than the change in cast, the behind-the-scenes talent has returned, from directors Kong Sheng and Li Xue to writer Hai Yan, whose Web novel of the same name was the basis of the first series. So quality-wise, there is definitely a sense of continuity. There is that same satisfyingly cerebral approach to the storytelling in the way characters analyse things: Who might have done this? What is at stake? What is the most advantageous move to make? But Nirvana In Fire II is also its own animal. 안전놀이터 It takes place after the events of the earlier show and is set during the tumultuous period of the northern and southern dynasties in the sixth century. The Changlin army defends the Liang Dynasty's northern frontier and is led by Xiao Tingsheng (Sun Chun) and his son Xiao Pingzhang (Huang Xiaoming); younger son Pingjing (Liu Haoran) wants to be a carefree wanderer. They have the trust of the emperor, but others at court are wary of the power wielded by the house of Changlin. The story begins with Pingzhang holding down the fort in the north and in desperate need of supplies - but the ships never make it. After the battle, Pingjing sets out to investigate the sinking of the vessels. The opening arc sets in motion court rivalry and intrigue with ideas of loyalty and sacrifice. Add to the mix an ailing emperor, an insecure empress, a young crown prince and things become even more fraught. A-list actor Huang brings gravitas and intelligence to the role of Pingzhang and there is warmth and even moments of humour in interactions with his younger brother and his wife, played by Tong Liya from 2015's comedy mystery Detective Chinatown. Relative newcomer Liu, 20, more than holds his own playing a mischievous and good-hearted young man who learns that the world can be a treacherous place. 바카라사이트 Pacing wise, Nirvana In Fire II unfolds at a more stately pace. It is not until about one-third into the 50 episodes that we get a glimpse into why the empress' spiritual adviser Puyang Ying (the silkily villainous Guo Jingfei) is nefariously scheming away. The sequel is more of a slow burn, but it remains compelling. The show of strength by Chinese television shows in recent years is not just in scripted dramas, but also in variety programmes. They have a wide range of absorbing formats plus the draw of top celebrities. On a recent holiday in Beijing, I found myself glued to the quiz show Who's Still Standing?; the creative music programme PhantaCity, featuring the still-luminous Faye Wong; and Chinese Restaurant, a reality show about celebrities running an eatery in a foreign land. Incidentally, Huang had appeared in the first season of Chinese Restaurant (2017), which was set in Thailand's Ko Chang. In the second season, actresses Zhao Wei and Shu Qi, singer-actor Alec Su, TFBoys' leader Karry Wang and singer Bai Jugang set up shop in the picturesque town of Colmar in France. It's fun seeing the stars interacting with one another and finding out who can cook. Shu often plays sexy on screen, but Bai calls her "Qi ge", or brother Qi, and it's like she's one of the guys. And despite his young age, Wang, 18, is most assured in the kitchen. There is also some drama in the form of problems, such as the language barrier and an unexpectedly heavy storm that lashes down. It comes as something of a jolt to realise that Zhao and Su were co-stars on My Fair Princess in 1998, the period comedy drama that turned her into a star. And there's a touching reunion when actor Zhang Tielin, who played the Qianlong emperor in the show, makes an imperious guest appearance here.
    Sep 12, 2018 620
  • 12 Sep 2018
    THE "shelf life" of an athlete is relatively short. In most sports, the athlete will peak at around age 25 to 28. A few will continue with the sport, as coaches, for instance, but most will have to embark on a career in something else. 카지노사이트 Thus, the years leading up to their peak are very important if we want them to be able to stand up to competition on the regional, if not world, stage, as well as prepare them for life after sports. Here in Singapore, certain sports like football and basketball have a go-professional option, where the athletes can focus on their sport full time and earn a living from it. In other sports, the athletes may not be so lucky. They are, at most, semi-pro and, for the 20 to 23 age group, most have to balance intense sports training with their studies. In a society where decent post-secondary education is a basic requirement, most of our young athletes are pressured to pursue a post-secondary education on top of pursuing sporting excellence.   Sadly, I have seen talented athletes give up their sport as they enter higher education because they struggle with this tension. Studies win and our sports suffer. 온라인카지노 One suggestion would be for our universities and polytechnics to allow such students to do their courses of study in extended time. For example, a typical university course is about three yearslong, with an additional year for honours. Can a student-athlete be permitted to complete his degree in six or seven years? With a more manageable workload, they can then balance both sports and studies effectively. Something similar may already be available on a case-by-case basis, but student-athletes may still struggle as they may feel they are lagging behind their peers. There is also the problem of key competition dates clashing with examinations. What possible pathways do higher-education institutions have available for these talented athletes? Singapore wants champions but we also have a duty to help them level up for their post-sports careers.
    204 Posted by Jake Kennedy
  • THE "shelf life" of an athlete is relatively short. In most sports, the athlete will peak at around age 25 to 28. A few will continue with the sport, as coaches, for instance, but most will have to embark on a career in something else. 카지노사이트 Thus, the years leading up to their peak are very important if we want them to be able to stand up to competition on the regional, if not world, stage, as well as prepare them for life after sports. Here in Singapore, certain sports like football and basketball have a go-professional option, where the athletes can focus on their sport full time and earn a living from it. In other sports, the athletes may not be so lucky. They are, at most, semi-pro and, for the 20 to 23 age group, most have to balance intense sports training with their studies. In a society where decent post-secondary education is a basic requirement, most of our young athletes are pressured to pursue a post-secondary education on top of pursuing sporting excellence.   Sadly, I have seen talented athletes give up their sport as they enter higher education because they struggle with this tension. Studies win and our sports suffer. 온라인카지노 One suggestion would be for our universities and polytechnics to allow such students to do their courses of study in extended time. For example, a typical university course is about three yearslong, with an additional year for honours. Can a student-athlete be permitted to complete his degree in six or seven years? With a more manageable workload, they can then balance both sports and studies effectively. Something similar may already be available on a case-by-case basis, but student-athletes may still struggle as they may feel they are lagging behind their peers. There is also the problem of key competition dates clashing with examinations. What possible pathways do higher-education institutions have available for these talented athletes? Singapore wants champions but we also have a duty to help them level up for their post-sports careers.
    Sep 12, 2018 204
  • 12 Sep 2018
    I AM saddened that the Little India riot on Sunday has attracted so much attention worldwide (“Foreign media shocked, notes rising tensions here”; Tuesday). 카지노사이트주소 For more than 40 years, Singapore has been a peaceful place for people from all walks of life to live in, work and play. The latest incident does not do justice to the efforts of the Government to foster close interaction and integration between Singaporeans and foreigners. Most Singaporeans welcome foreigners to live and work here, and we expect them to adapt to our way of life. So, the culprits who caused wilful damage in Little India should be dealt with severely and all necessary measures put in place to prevent a repeat of such incidents. Singaporeans should avoid stereotyping and negative perceptions of foreigners who come to live and work among them. Rightly or wrongly, we are aware of the differences between “us” and “them”. However, “us” and “them” does not have to mean “us” versus “them”. As adults, we should be better able to deal with human diversity. 바카라사이트주소       Those opposed to immigration and the influx of foreign labour see it as legitimate to fear the economic and social costs arising from the presence of large numbers of foreigners here. While some of these perceptions may appear justifiable, we must realise that the overwhelming majority of foreigners in our midst are hard-working, peace-loving and law-abiding. Foreign workers sacrifice a lot to come here to help in our infrastructure development, giving us roads and beautiful homes. Understandably, our image as a peaceful nation has been affected by the riot. So it is imperative that we should all help in ensuring that there is no repeat.
    658 Posted by Jake Kennedy
  • I AM saddened that the Little India riot on Sunday has attracted so much attention worldwide (“Foreign media shocked, notes rising tensions here”; Tuesday). 카지노사이트주소 For more than 40 years, Singapore has been a peaceful place for people from all walks of life to live in, work and play. The latest incident does not do justice to the efforts of the Government to foster close interaction and integration between Singaporeans and foreigners. Most Singaporeans welcome foreigners to live and work here, and we expect them to adapt to our way of life. So, the culprits who caused wilful damage in Little India should be dealt with severely and all necessary measures put in place to prevent a repeat of such incidents. Singaporeans should avoid stereotyping and negative perceptions of foreigners who come to live and work among them. Rightly or wrongly, we are aware of the differences between “us” and “them”. However, “us” and “them” does not have to mean “us” versus “them”. As adults, we should be better able to deal with human diversity. 바카라사이트주소       Those opposed to immigration and the influx of foreign labour see it as legitimate to fear the economic and social costs arising from the presence of large numbers of foreigners here. While some of these perceptions may appear justifiable, we must realise that the overwhelming majority of foreigners in our midst are hard-working, peace-loving and law-abiding. Foreign workers sacrifice a lot to come here to help in our infrastructure development, giving us roads and beautiful homes. Understandably, our image as a peaceful nation has been affected by the riot. So it is imperative that we should all help in ensuring that there is no repeat.
    Sep 12, 2018 658
  • 12 Sep 2018
    TASTE and sensitivity in the use of pictures is a matter photographers and editors of The Straits Times grapple with routinely. Each day, we select for publication about 80 to 100 photographs from among the hundreds taken by our photographers or supplied by wire agencies, readers or other sources. It is a painstaking task, and often, difficult decisions have to be made relatively quickly regarding the choice of pictures. And readers do not always agree with those decisions. A photograph on the front page of The Straits Times last month caught the attention of ST reader John Stuart. It showed a fatally wounded Egyptian police general being carried away after a bombing in the Egyptian capital, Cairo. Mr Stuart, took issue with the publication of the picture which he found professionally distasteful and insensitive. 바카라사이트 Citing the American national code of photographers, he stated that no reputable newspaper should publish an identifiable picture of a dead or dying person, as we did in publishing the picture of the Egyptian police general. Mr Stuart, who had worked as a journalist and photographer in the United States and resides currently in Singapore, noted that no major America newspaper would publish such pictures. To buttress his view, he cited  the American National Press Photographers Association's Code of Ethics which states in part: "Treat all subjects with respect and dignity. Give special consideration to vulnerable subjects and compassion to victims of crime or tragedy. Intrude on private moments of grief only when the public has an overriding and justifiable need to see." This is an excellent guideline which ST's newsroom editors agree with; in fact, we practise it every day. In many cases, we would refrain from publishing pictures which show clearly the face of a dead or dying person, provided there is no compelling reason in the public interest to use them. For instance, one of our reports on the current crisis in the Ukraine on April 24 described a shootout during which three men were killed. One picture which came through the wires showed a body in a coffin, the face clearly visible. We decided against publication  and opted for a less striking picture where the body was not visible. That was a fairly clear-cut case. On the other hand, the picture of the dying Egyptian police chief was less clear-cut. While a morbidly curious reader could form a fairly good idea of how the victim looks, most ST readers would have been struck less by the look, than the drama of the panic and desperation surrounding the movement informed by the picture which the photographer captured; and this latter point convinced us to use it. The picture told our readers in the best way possible about the consequences of this particular outbreak of violence in the Middle East. 인터넷카지노 There are grey areas here - and in many other situations - which call for editorial judgment. Much as we agree with the view that special consideration should be accorded to the vulnerable, it is not possible to subscribe to a blanket ban on publishing images that show the face of a dying or dead person, as some readers would prefer. We believe that the decision to publish such a picture should be approached on a case-by-case basis. If the victim is a prominent newsmaker or a key official, the public's right and need to see, as well as the considerable implications of the tragedy involving the newsmaker, may well override the considerations of personal intrusion. One instance was the picture of a fatally-injured  American ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens caught in the horrific terrorist attack against the US embassy in Benghazi, Libya two years ago. Mr Stuart took issue with the publication of this photograph as well and wondered whether ST practised a policy of using pictures of only foreign victims but not of Singaporeans. We don't. While a strict observance of the code would deny the use of such a picture, many major newspapers published it because of the international implications of the attack.  The picture of Ambassador Stevens rescued finally, albeit tragically, resonated because it described - more than  the proverbial thousand-word description could - the horror and cruelty of the terror attack on an internationally recognised sanctuary like an embassy. The ambassador was the fatal victim and the US embassy was the target in this instance. But the picture drove home the message to law-abiding citizens everywhere that terrorism recognises no legal boundaries; it also suggests why terrorism must be rooted out, or suffer the tragic consequences. 인터넷바카라 Like The Straits Times, major American publications such as the Los Angeles Times published the picture of Ambassador Stevens. While America's leading mainstream paper, the New York Times did not use the picture in its print edition, it published the photograph in its online edition, which drew the criticism of the US Government. The US Government sought to have the picture removed but NYT refused and its associate editor Phillip Corbett explained: "Such decisions are never easy, and this one was harder than most. But this chaotic and violent event was extremely significant as a news story, and we believe this photo helps to convey that situation to Times readers in a powerful way. On that basis, we think the photo was newsworthy and important to our coverage."   Where The Straits Times draws a line is when the picture is about blood and gore. If a picture's sole value is that it is crude and gruesome, we ban it. We are not alone in adopting such a policy. Many other major newspapers around the world do as well, despite the constant persistence of alternative media, especially online, in ignoring this line in the sand. Our job is to report major, dramatic news events well while being sensitive to family members of victims and never to come across as trying to sensationalise an event. We sometimes receive requests from families to not publish pictures of their grief, and we often accede. At times, we know we will upset some family members and readers. Every picture published involves a judgment call. One of our guiding principles is to err on the side of caution. Sometimes we still get it wrong. That is a key reason we keep our dialogue open with ST readers who see what we sometimes do not. We are grateful when ST readers point out instances where we have let our guard down. Their constructive feedback makes us relook our assumptions and processes continuously and helps us to improve our product.
    609 Posted by Jake Kennedy
  • TASTE and sensitivity in the use of pictures is a matter photographers and editors of The Straits Times grapple with routinely. Each day, we select for publication about 80 to 100 photographs from among the hundreds taken by our photographers or supplied by wire agencies, readers or other sources. It is a painstaking task, and often, difficult decisions have to be made relatively quickly regarding the choice of pictures. And readers do not always agree with those decisions. A photograph on the front page of The Straits Times last month caught the attention of ST reader John Stuart. It showed a fatally wounded Egyptian police general being carried away after a bombing in the Egyptian capital, Cairo. Mr Stuart, took issue with the publication of the picture which he found professionally distasteful and insensitive. 바카라사이트 Citing the American national code of photographers, he stated that no reputable newspaper should publish an identifiable picture of a dead or dying person, as we did in publishing the picture of the Egyptian police general. Mr Stuart, who had worked as a journalist and photographer in the United States and resides currently in Singapore, noted that no major America newspaper would publish such pictures. To buttress his view, he cited  the American National Press Photographers Association's Code of Ethics which states in part: "Treat all subjects with respect and dignity. Give special consideration to vulnerable subjects and compassion to victims of crime or tragedy. Intrude on private moments of grief only when the public has an overriding and justifiable need to see." This is an excellent guideline which ST's newsroom editors agree with; in fact, we practise it every day. In many cases, we would refrain from publishing pictures which show clearly the face of a dead or dying person, provided there is no compelling reason in the public interest to use them. For instance, one of our reports on the current crisis in the Ukraine on April 24 described a shootout during which three men were killed. One picture which came through the wires showed a body in a coffin, the face clearly visible. We decided against publication  and opted for a less striking picture where the body was not visible. That was a fairly clear-cut case. On the other hand, the picture of the dying Egyptian police chief was less clear-cut. While a morbidly curious reader could form a fairly good idea of how the victim looks, most ST readers would have been struck less by the look, than the drama of the panic and desperation surrounding the movement informed by the picture which the photographer captured; and this latter point convinced us to use it. The picture told our readers in the best way possible about the consequences of this particular outbreak of violence in the Middle East. 인터넷카지노 There are grey areas here - and in many other situations - which call for editorial judgment. Much as we agree with the view that special consideration should be accorded to the vulnerable, it is not possible to subscribe to a blanket ban on publishing images that show the face of a dying or dead person, as some readers would prefer. We believe that the decision to publish such a picture should be approached on a case-by-case basis. If the victim is a prominent newsmaker or a key official, the public's right and need to see, as well as the considerable implications of the tragedy involving the newsmaker, may well override the considerations of personal intrusion. One instance was the picture of a fatally-injured  American ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens caught in the horrific terrorist attack against the US embassy in Benghazi, Libya two years ago. Mr Stuart took issue with the publication of this photograph as well and wondered whether ST practised a policy of using pictures of only foreign victims but not of Singaporeans. We don't. While a strict observance of the code would deny the use of such a picture, many major newspapers published it because of the international implications of the attack.  The picture of Ambassador Stevens rescued finally, albeit tragically, resonated because it described - more than  the proverbial thousand-word description could - the horror and cruelty of the terror attack on an internationally recognised sanctuary like an embassy. The ambassador was the fatal victim and the US embassy was the target in this instance. But the picture drove home the message to law-abiding citizens everywhere that terrorism recognises no legal boundaries; it also suggests why terrorism must be rooted out, or suffer the tragic consequences. 인터넷바카라 Like The Straits Times, major American publications such as the Los Angeles Times published the picture of Ambassador Stevens. While America's leading mainstream paper, the New York Times did not use the picture in its print edition, it published the photograph in its online edition, which drew the criticism of the US Government. The US Government sought to have the picture removed but NYT refused and its associate editor Phillip Corbett explained: "Such decisions are never easy, and this one was harder than most. But this chaotic and violent event was extremely significant as a news story, and we believe this photo helps to convey that situation to Times readers in a powerful way. On that basis, we think the photo was newsworthy and important to our coverage."   Where The Straits Times draws a line is when the picture is about blood and gore. If a picture's sole value is that it is crude and gruesome, we ban it. We are not alone in adopting such a policy. Many other major newspapers around the world do as well, despite the constant persistence of alternative media, especially online, in ignoring this line in the sand. Our job is to report major, dramatic news events well while being sensitive to family members of victims and never to come across as trying to sensationalise an event. We sometimes receive requests from families to not publish pictures of their grief, and we often accede. At times, we know we will upset some family members and readers. Every picture published involves a judgment call. One of our guiding principles is to err on the side of caution. Sometimes we still get it wrong. That is a key reason we keep our dialogue open with ST readers who see what we sometimes do not. We are grateful when ST readers point out instances where we have let our guard down. Their constructive feedback makes us relook our assumptions and processes continuously and helps us to improve our product.
    Sep 12, 2018 609
  • 12 Sep 2018
    WHEN an e-mail by "The Knowns" landed on the morning of Sept 16, purporting to have exposed the personal data of some 300,000 customers of a local karaoke bar chain,  the instant reaction in The Straits Times newsroom was to verify. Despite its moniker, the sender, or senders, was not known. And the newsroom of a national broadsheet does receive thousands of e-mails daily, some with credible news tip offs, others simply sharing their views and the rest containing what can at best be described as factually-challenged assertions. 안전놀이터 In an e-mail titled A Warning To Singapore Government, the hackers said it was releasing the information as it was unhappy that toll charges will soon be increased on this side of the Causeway. Reporters at the  local news desk reached out to the authorities immediately. Three bodies were contacted: the Infocomm Development Authority, the Personal Data Protection Commission and the Police.  Not surprisingly, they could not confirm the veracity of the e-mail on the spot. We waited, contacted the K Box company and combed through its membership database ourselves. It became apparent that the content was most likely to be accurate because our journalists found their personal details of addresses, e-mails, and phone and identity-card numbers on the list. Clearly, some of us in the newsroom like to unwind with a song or two after work. We started working on stories on the incident, for both print and online. Granted, the checks mentioned above caused The Straits Times to be slower in this instance with the news compared to its rivals and other websites. But reliability and trustworthiness remain the lifeblood of a newspaper and even in this age of fast breaking news on digital platforms, the three cardinal rules of journalism remain unchanged: accuracy, accuracy and accuracy. 카지노사이트 Nonetheless, problems started to arise as we tried to find out more. A reporter was working on reactions of K Box members whose information has been leaked and she gave the feedback that none of them wanted to be named in our stories. That goes against the rulebook, which maintains that we usually put not only a name to those whom we spoke to, but also his age and occupation. The reason is because of credibility.   Readers must know that when they come across a view or opinion expressed in this newspaper, it is genuine and not manufactured. It is for this same reason that the paper's Forum pages insist on letter writers carrying their names in full. But exceptions are made in our stories, when personal safety, legal constraints and occupational compromises come into play. In this instance, the reason cited by the newsmakers was fear that it could encourage further privacy intrusions.  An editorial call was made that the concern was valid and we would run a story without the respondents' full names and details. Problem No 1 solved. The second one, which is trickier, popped up soon.  While the K Box database was leaked, the expose was initially a limited one. The hackers had placed the membership list on a website. It is believed to have sent a hyperlink of the website to only mainstream and social media outlets. But the link was quickly tossed out in public. Socio-political site The Real Singapore took a screengrab of the e-mail from the hackers and uploaded it on its website and Facebook account. Should The Straits Times report this trail of exposures? We could have opted for omission. But it would leave readers none the wiser as to how the database went from the e-mail accounts of journalists to the  public domain, a doubt which could impact the integrity of the reporters and editors. 바카라사이트주소     The decision was to include the factual chain of events and report how the leak went viral. It is important to inform our readers that the perpetrators did not publish the information publicly. It was subsequent actions which opened the doors.  After the report was published, some readers wrote in to criticise The Straits Times for mentioning The Real Singapore website and its report of the leak. But we have stuck to the facts and took pains not to publish the link to the leaked database on any of our platforms. There is a fine balance between privacy and public interest. When faced with the pace and pressure of producing content daily for a national broadsheet, it is hoped that we get it right more often than not. More than just The Knowns, it is a relentless challenge to deal with the known unknowns and the unknown unknowns - to quote former US defence chief Donald Rumsfeld - in the fast-changing terrain of Singapore.
    628 Posted by Jake Kennedy
  • WHEN an e-mail by "The Knowns" landed on the morning of Sept 16, purporting to have exposed the personal data of some 300,000 customers of a local karaoke bar chain,  the instant reaction in The Straits Times newsroom was to verify. Despite its moniker, the sender, or senders, was not known. And the newsroom of a national broadsheet does receive thousands of e-mails daily, some with credible news tip offs, others simply sharing their views and the rest containing what can at best be described as factually-challenged assertions. 안전놀이터 In an e-mail titled A Warning To Singapore Government, the hackers said it was releasing the information as it was unhappy that toll charges will soon be increased on this side of the Causeway. Reporters at the  local news desk reached out to the authorities immediately. Three bodies were contacted: the Infocomm Development Authority, the Personal Data Protection Commission and the Police.  Not surprisingly, they could not confirm the veracity of the e-mail on the spot. We waited, contacted the K Box company and combed through its membership database ourselves. It became apparent that the content was most likely to be accurate because our journalists found their personal details of addresses, e-mails, and phone and identity-card numbers on the list. Clearly, some of us in the newsroom like to unwind with a song or two after work. We started working on stories on the incident, for both print and online. Granted, the checks mentioned above caused The Straits Times to be slower in this instance with the news compared to its rivals and other websites. But reliability and trustworthiness remain the lifeblood of a newspaper and even in this age of fast breaking news on digital platforms, the three cardinal rules of journalism remain unchanged: accuracy, accuracy and accuracy. 카지노사이트 Nonetheless, problems started to arise as we tried to find out more. A reporter was working on reactions of K Box members whose information has been leaked and she gave the feedback that none of them wanted to be named in our stories. That goes against the rulebook, which maintains that we usually put not only a name to those whom we spoke to, but also his age and occupation. The reason is because of credibility.   Readers must know that when they come across a view or opinion expressed in this newspaper, it is genuine and not manufactured. It is for this same reason that the paper's Forum pages insist on letter writers carrying their names in full. But exceptions are made in our stories, when personal safety, legal constraints and occupational compromises come into play. In this instance, the reason cited by the newsmakers was fear that it could encourage further privacy intrusions.  An editorial call was made that the concern was valid and we would run a story without the respondents' full names and details. Problem No 1 solved. The second one, which is trickier, popped up soon.  While the K Box database was leaked, the expose was initially a limited one. The hackers had placed the membership list on a website. It is believed to have sent a hyperlink of the website to only mainstream and social media outlets. But the link was quickly tossed out in public. Socio-political site The Real Singapore took a screengrab of the e-mail from the hackers and uploaded it on its website and Facebook account. Should The Straits Times report this trail of exposures? We could have opted for omission. But it would leave readers none the wiser as to how the database went from the e-mail accounts of journalists to the  public domain, a doubt which could impact the integrity of the reporters and editors. 바카라사이트주소     The decision was to include the factual chain of events and report how the leak went viral. It is important to inform our readers that the perpetrators did not publish the information publicly. It was subsequent actions which opened the doors.  After the report was published, some readers wrote in to criticise The Straits Times for mentioning The Real Singapore website and its report of the leak. But we have stuck to the facts and took pains not to publish the link to the leaked database on any of our platforms. There is a fine balance between privacy and public interest. When faced with the pace and pressure of producing content daily for a national broadsheet, it is hoped that we get it right more often than not. More than just The Knowns, it is a relentless challenge to deal with the known unknowns and the unknown unknowns - to quote former US defence chief Donald Rumsfeld - in the fast-changing terrain of Singapore.
    Sep 12, 2018 628
  • 12 Sep 2018
    Stories of the Botanical Gardens, or BG as we called it,  brought to mind the times my friends and I used to spend in the Botanical Gardens, and after rummaging through old pictures I came across one particular photograph which featured the second Tembusu tree. It was taken in August 1941, when “life was a breeze”  just before the outbreak of World War II. The camera used was a Brownie and was developed at home. I was only 18 then. 온라인카지노 During the August school holidays my friends and I would take a morning walk from Hooper Road to the BG and spent carefree moments with Mother Nature.  We would wake up at 5am, prepare a few sandwiches (prawn sambal or corned beef wrapped by French bread), and with bottles of water and thermos flask’s of tea or coffee make our way to the BG. Plastic was unheard of then and we used  small enamel cups to quench our thirst.  The BG in those days was a fairyland for us with its resplendent greenery. We played games on the open spaces of grass, sat on the lake after a game of hide and seek. There were two swans there. Photographs were taken and this particular snapshot was on the limb of the Tembusu tree which is located  at the corner of Palms Valley. Unfortunately the branch has been cut off but the tree still stands there tall and majestic. It must be over 100 years old. 온라인바카라 Sadly all my friends have passed on, so this particular photograph brings back memories of the  good old days when the outdoors was a source of so much fun and activity – no computer, no distracting HP – only the radio and records of lovely music to listen to – not to mention a few good books. How nostalgic.
    277 Posted by Jake Kennedy
  • Stories of the Botanical Gardens, or BG as we called it,  brought to mind the times my friends and I used to spend in the Botanical Gardens, and after rummaging through old pictures I came across one particular photograph which featured the second Tembusu tree. It was taken in August 1941, when “life was a breeze”  just before the outbreak of World War II. The camera used was a Brownie and was developed at home. I was only 18 then. 온라인카지노 During the August school holidays my friends and I would take a morning walk from Hooper Road to the BG and spent carefree moments with Mother Nature.  We would wake up at 5am, prepare a few sandwiches (prawn sambal or corned beef wrapped by French bread), and with bottles of water and thermos flask’s of tea or coffee make our way to the BG. Plastic was unheard of then and we used  small enamel cups to quench our thirst.  The BG in those days was a fairyland for us with its resplendent greenery. We played games on the open spaces of grass, sat on the lake after a game of hide and seek. There were two swans there. Photographs were taken and this particular snapshot was on the limb of the Tembusu tree which is located  at the corner of Palms Valley. Unfortunately the branch has been cut off but the tree still stands there tall and majestic. It must be over 100 years old. 온라인바카라 Sadly all my friends have passed on, so this particular photograph brings back memories of the  good old days when the outdoors was a source of so much fun and activity – no computer, no distracting HP – only the radio and records of lovely music to listen to – not to mention a few good books. How nostalgic.
    Sep 12, 2018 277
  • 12 Sep 2018
    My family and I have enjoyed countless hours of fun at the very Marina Barrage that Lee Wei Ling's Papa, Lee Kuan Yew, dreamed of.  인터넷카지노 On one of those trips to the Barrage, my three daughters, my husband and I had the privilege of seeing her beloved Papa. It was about four years ago, on a quiet weekday afternoon during the school holidays, and he must have taken that opportunity to visit the Barrage to soak in its sights and sounds.  He was dressed in a light pink shirt and cream-coloured trousers, looking very happy as the buggy passed by families just like ours, mums and dads with young children in tow. We didn't dare approach the buggy but just like the other excited children (and parents!), waved frantically to him while calling out "Hello Mr Lee!". He acknowledged every one of us by happily waving back. 인터넷바카라 As he approached the end of the Barrage, Mr Lee met two groups of university students who had gone there in their convocation gowns to take the requisite graduation photos. How thrilled they must have been to see the founding father of Singapore, the man who had a vision for Singapore, who dreamed about building the very Barrage they were standing on, alight from his buggy and pose with them for a few pictures! He took the time to exchange pleasantries with these graduates and shook their hands.      We stood afar and envied the lucky group of fresh graduates. What a fitting start to their foray into the world! To be standing next to a man without whom their education would not have been possible. To start their careers after having been wished well by the first Prime Minister of their country. I know the memory of this experience will be indelibly etched in the minds of these students for years and years to come. The nation wept together for the passing of Dr Lee's Papa. My family sent him off in the pouring rain as the gun carriage made its final journey past City Hall. Everywhere triggered a memory of him. The raintrees flanking the East Coast Parkway, the riot of colours from the bougainvillea along that same expressway, little things here and there that became a reality after your Papa sowed the seeds of a dream. 카지노사이트 I am grateful to Mr Lee for dreaming big dreams for Singapore. Every Singaporean owes what we enjoy today from the vision he had for our fledgling nation. My children can continue to build upon their hopes and aspirations for their future to fulfil dreams of their own.  We prayed as a family last night before going to bed that we will work hard and contribute to the continued success in Singapore, even if in small ways. There is a hope and a dream for our future. Because her Papa believed in this country, fought hard for it, and never gave up on it even when the challenges seemed insurmountable.  We will strive to do the same.
    625 Posted by Jake Kennedy
  • My family and I have enjoyed countless hours of fun at the very Marina Barrage that Lee Wei Ling's Papa, Lee Kuan Yew, dreamed of.  인터넷카지노 On one of those trips to the Barrage, my three daughters, my husband and I had the privilege of seeing her beloved Papa. It was about four years ago, on a quiet weekday afternoon during the school holidays, and he must have taken that opportunity to visit the Barrage to soak in its sights and sounds.  He was dressed in a light pink shirt and cream-coloured trousers, looking very happy as the buggy passed by families just like ours, mums and dads with young children in tow. We didn't dare approach the buggy but just like the other excited children (and parents!), waved frantically to him while calling out "Hello Mr Lee!". He acknowledged every one of us by happily waving back. 인터넷바카라 As he approached the end of the Barrage, Mr Lee met two groups of university students who had gone there in their convocation gowns to take the requisite graduation photos. How thrilled they must have been to see the founding father of Singapore, the man who had a vision for Singapore, who dreamed about building the very Barrage they were standing on, alight from his buggy and pose with them for a few pictures! He took the time to exchange pleasantries with these graduates and shook their hands.      We stood afar and envied the lucky group of fresh graduates. What a fitting start to their foray into the world! To be standing next to a man without whom their education would not have been possible. To start their careers after having been wished well by the first Prime Minister of their country. I know the memory of this experience will be indelibly etched in the minds of these students for years and years to come. The nation wept together for the passing of Dr Lee's Papa. My family sent him off in the pouring rain as the gun carriage made its final journey past City Hall. Everywhere triggered a memory of him. The raintrees flanking the East Coast Parkway, the riot of colours from the bougainvillea along that same expressway, little things here and there that became a reality after your Papa sowed the seeds of a dream. 카지노사이트 I am grateful to Mr Lee for dreaming big dreams for Singapore. Every Singaporean owes what we enjoy today from the vision he had for our fledgling nation. My children can continue to build upon their hopes and aspirations for their future to fulfil dreams of their own.  We prayed as a family last night before going to bed that we will work hard and contribute to the continued success in Singapore, even if in small ways. There is a hope and a dream for our future. Because her Papa believed in this country, fought hard for it, and never gave up on it even when the challenges seemed insurmountable.  We will strive to do the same.
    Sep 12, 2018 625
  • 12 Sep 2018
    The SkillsFuture scheme is a great example of a national movement to help bring about relevancy and employability, and through that, a sense of security in an increasingly volatile socio-economic climate. 카지노사이트주소  However, perhaps one aspect of SkillsFuture that could do with some further attention is how to help learners make informed choices about what they should learn and how it will improve their prospects when it comes to employability. While there are a number of online and offline initiatives that provide useful insights on career advancement and how to remain employable, it is up to the thousands of trainers under the SkillsFuture banner to impart how the training offered helps in enhancing employability.   Such awareness can be brought about by including basic employment counselling skills as part of the training that SkillsFuture trainers receive. 바카라사이트주소  At the very least, SkillsFuture trainers ought to be aware of the broad employment trends and the in-demand skills in their own domains, so as to help transfer such insights to their trainees.
    328 Posted by Jake Kennedy
  • The SkillsFuture scheme is a great example of a national movement to help bring about relevancy and employability, and through that, a sense of security in an increasingly volatile socio-economic climate. 카지노사이트주소  However, perhaps one aspect of SkillsFuture that could do with some further attention is how to help learners make informed choices about what they should learn and how it will improve their prospects when it comes to employability. While there are a number of online and offline initiatives that provide useful insights on career advancement and how to remain employable, it is up to the thousands of trainers under the SkillsFuture banner to impart how the training offered helps in enhancing employability.   Such awareness can be brought about by including basic employment counselling skills as part of the training that SkillsFuture trainers receive. 바카라사이트주소  At the very least, SkillsFuture trainers ought to be aware of the broad employment trends and the in-demand skills in their own domains, so as to help transfer such insights to their trainees.
    Sep 12, 2018 328
  • 12 Sep 2018
    The rise in suicide rates among Singaporeans above the age of 60 is deeply disconcerting. 바카라사이트 While it is frequently assumed that intractable pain and financial woes are the chief motivating factors, it is premature to arrive at such conclusions (Consider legalising euthanasia, by Mr Seah Yam Meng; Aug 1). Palliative care has rapidly progressed in the past decade to include specialist-led services spanning hospitals, daycare centres and home care. Access to palliative care is now commonplace in Singapore. Medical advancement has also enabled physicians to effectively alleviate pain and other distressing symptoms in the vast majority of patients at the end-of-life stage. Over the years, there has been an increase in Medisave withdrawal limits and increased subsidies for end-of-life care. These help to alleviate the financial concerns of the elderly facing terminal illnesses.   Not all elderly people who attempt suicide suffer from terminal illnesses. 인터넷카지노 There needs to be a comprehensive evaluation to identify specific unmet needs that compel the elderly to hasten death. Significant risk factors include undiagnosed depression, social isolation, loneliness as well as progressive functional disabilities from chronic, but not necessarily life-limiting, illnesses. Resolving these issues requires proactive advocacy for holistic programmes that empower our elderly to lead active and fulfilling lives. Public spaces can also be reinvented to promote inclusivity for people with cognitive and physical disabilities. Greater efforts to promote societal literacy regarding mental wellness in older adults will be crucial to identifying the vulnerable elderly, as well as in enhancing their early access to professional help. In contrast, euthanasia provides a cold and overly convenient end to what is essentially a deeply humanistic issue - how to enable the elderly to age and die in a graceful and dignified manner. Legalising euthanasia will inadvertently lead society down a steep and slippery moral slope, as is seen in the Netherlands. 인터넷바카라 There, approved indications for medically assisted deaths extend to include people with dementia, people with psychiatric conditions, young people from the age of 12 and, more recently, elderly folk who express a non-specific tiredness for living. The elderly among us should be cared for and supported. For our society to evolve in a wise and compassionate manner, suicide - self-inflicted or medically-assisted - must remain an unnecessary end.
    283 Posted by Jake Kennedy
  • The rise in suicide rates among Singaporeans above the age of 60 is deeply disconcerting. 바카라사이트 While it is frequently assumed that intractable pain and financial woes are the chief motivating factors, it is premature to arrive at such conclusions (Consider legalising euthanasia, by Mr Seah Yam Meng; Aug 1). Palliative care has rapidly progressed in the past decade to include specialist-led services spanning hospitals, daycare centres and home care. Access to palliative care is now commonplace in Singapore. Medical advancement has also enabled physicians to effectively alleviate pain and other distressing symptoms in the vast majority of patients at the end-of-life stage. Over the years, there has been an increase in Medisave withdrawal limits and increased subsidies for end-of-life care. These help to alleviate the financial concerns of the elderly facing terminal illnesses.   Not all elderly people who attempt suicide suffer from terminal illnesses. 인터넷카지노 There needs to be a comprehensive evaluation to identify specific unmet needs that compel the elderly to hasten death. Significant risk factors include undiagnosed depression, social isolation, loneliness as well as progressive functional disabilities from chronic, but not necessarily life-limiting, illnesses. Resolving these issues requires proactive advocacy for holistic programmes that empower our elderly to lead active and fulfilling lives. Public spaces can also be reinvented to promote inclusivity for people with cognitive and physical disabilities. Greater efforts to promote societal literacy regarding mental wellness in older adults will be crucial to identifying the vulnerable elderly, as well as in enhancing their early access to professional help. In contrast, euthanasia provides a cold and overly convenient end to what is essentially a deeply humanistic issue - how to enable the elderly to age and die in a graceful and dignified manner. Legalising euthanasia will inadvertently lead society down a steep and slippery moral slope, as is seen in the Netherlands. 인터넷바카라 There, approved indications for medically assisted deaths extend to include people with dementia, people with psychiatric conditions, young people from the age of 12 and, more recently, elderly folk who express a non-specific tiredness for living. The elderly among us should be cared for and supported. For our society to evolve in a wise and compassionate manner, suicide - self-inflicted or medically-assisted - must remain an unnecessary end.
    Sep 12, 2018 283
  • 12 Sep 2018
    The annual Yellow Ribbon Prison Run will take place on Sept 9. It has three goals: To create awareness of giving second chances to former convicts, generate acceptance of former convicts in the community, and inspire community action to support the rehabilitation and reintegration of former offenders. 인터넷바카라 According to the Singapore Prison Service last year, the rate of former convicts going back to jail within two years of being released remained stable at 26.5 per cent. This can be attributed to inmates securing gainful and stable employment, strong support from their families and the community, as well as their personal resolve to steer clear of crime, the prison service said. However, in my opinion, reintegrating former convicts remains a complicated and multi-dimensional challenge. The best rehabilitation regime during imprisonment is useless if former convicts find themselves rejected every time, after they are released and are trying to reintegrate into society. 카지노사이트 For example, many people still hold a dim view of former convicts. This is because they are afraid the former convicts will stray from the straight and narrow and go back to their old ways. However, taking such a view is not good for the future growth of Singapore. Former convicts served their time and paid the price for their crimes. I urge all Singaporeans to help more former convicts by giving them a second chance. It is said that no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. A second chance means a lot to former convicts. They will never have the courage to put their mistakes behind them and work on rebuilding their lives if they do not get the chance to do so.
    215 Posted by Jake Kennedy
  • The annual Yellow Ribbon Prison Run will take place on Sept 9. It has three goals: To create awareness of giving second chances to former convicts, generate acceptance of former convicts in the community, and inspire community action to support the rehabilitation and reintegration of former offenders. 인터넷바카라 According to the Singapore Prison Service last year, the rate of former convicts going back to jail within two years of being released remained stable at 26.5 per cent. This can be attributed to inmates securing gainful and stable employment, strong support from their families and the community, as well as their personal resolve to steer clear of crime, the prison service said. However, in my opinion, reintegrating former convicts remains a complicated and multi-dimensional challenge. The best rehabilitation regime during imprisonment is useless if former convicts find themselves rejected every time, after they are released and are trying to reintegrate into society. 카지노사이트 For example, many people still hold a dim view of former convicts. This is because they are afraid the former convicts will stray from the straight and narrow and go back to their old ways. However, taking such a view is not good for the future growth of Singapore. Former convicts served their time and paid the price for their crimes. I urge all Singaporeans to help more former convicts by giving them a second chance. It is said that no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. A second chance means a lot to former convicts. They will never have the courage to put their mistakes behind them and work on rebuilding their lives if they do not get the chance to do so.
    Sep 12, 2018 215

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  • 10 Sep 2018
    Just wondering why there's no real coverage or conversation on today's massive DDoS attack? Having to scour the other parts of the 안전놀이터 Internet for news and updates which I would have expected The Verge to automatically and masterfully cover. #wassup
    1147 Posted by Jake Kennedy
  • 14 Sep 2018
    My girlfriend was pretty excited that her new apartment had FiOS equipment pre-installed and has had the service for about a month. I knew that Verizon did some fairly pretty invasive stuff in terms of watching your activity while on their network, but she got a message threatening to suspend her internet if she continued to visit this website that hosts (to view but not download) videos, including copy-written content. Is there anyway around that stuff? 바카라사이트주소 Can you opt out like with some Comcast packages? Is using a VPN while she's online enough? I don't think anyone here is that into having company's monitor your browsing habits (although they all do to some extent) but I've never had AT&T or Comcast send me a notice for visiting RandomAnimeSiteC, let alone beam a threat directly into a blank tab when I open my computer. If there are any FiOS customers out there with other warnings about things you shouldn't try to do on Verizon's network, those comments would also be welcomed!
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  • 05 Sep 2018
    Over the years, the number of stray cats has declined significantly. 인터넷바카라 This is due to residents who have worked tirelessly to trap these cats for neutering. They are always on the lookout for newly abandoned cats and kittens, and they also speak to cat owners to advise them on neutering and keeping the animals indoors. 카지노사이트 Some of these residents have registered with the Cat Welfare Society so that they can help town councils mediate in cases where there are complaints about cats. Such unseen and unsung residents ought to be recognised for their community effort by the town councils. 인터넷카지노 All these residents ask for is that fellow residents be tolerant of the presence of cats, also called community cats, and that the town councils do not pander to a minority of complaining residents by culling these cats. As our little island gets rapidly concretised, such community cats add a softness to the harshness of our environment.
    695 Posted by Jake Kennedy
  • 12 Sep 2018
    I AM saddened that the Little India riot on Sunday has attracted so much attention worldwide (“Foreign media shocked, notes rising tensions here”; Tuesday). 카지노사이트주소 For more than 40 years, Singapore has been a peaceful place for people from all walks of life to live in, work and play. The latest incident does not do justice to the efforts of the Government to foster close interaction and integration between Singaporeans and foreigners. Most Singaporeans welcome foreigners to live and work here, and we expect them to adapt to our way of life. So, the culprits who caused wilful damage in Little India should be dealt with severely and all necessary measures put in place to prevent a repeat of such incidents. Singaporeans should avoid stereotyping and negative perceptions of foreigners who come to live and work among them. Rightly or wrongly, we are aware of the differences between “us” and “them”. However, “us” and “them” does not have to mean “us” versus “them”. As adults, we should be better able to deal with human diversity. 바카라사이트주소       Those opposed to immigration and the influx of foreign labour see it as legitimate to fear the economic and social costs arising from the presence of large numbers of foreigners here. While some of these perceptions may appear justifiable, we must realise that the overwhelming majority of foreigners in our midst are hard-working, peace-loving and law-abiding. Foreign workers sacrifice a lot to come here to help in our infrastructure development, giving us roads and beautiful homes. Understandably, our image as a peaceful nation has been affected by the riot. So it is imperative that we should all help in ensuring that there is no repeat.
    658 Posted by Jake Kennedy

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