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Self-Discipline 381 views Aug 22, 2018
Where Are the Septic Tank and Tile Fields - Finding Your Septi
Many rural homes are connected to septic systems and tile fields, and rely on them to effectively dispose of sanitary effluent generated by household activities. There have been many articles written about planning the installation of the system, suitable ground conditions for their function, how to maintain the septic system, and how to repair or replace failing systems.

Finding an existing septic system is critical to any of the above tasks, however. You need to keep heavy traffic off the tile field to prevent crushing buried pipes, and need to locate the septic tank access to properly inspect and service the system. Unfortunately, you may not have gotten the tank and tile field locations from the seller when you purchased the home, or you may simply have forgotten their locations over the years; in either case a little detective work may help resolve the matter.

There is a very good possibility that the local building department or county health department inspected the system when it was installed to verify that the size and soils were appropriate relative to the number of bedrooms and bathrooms ke nhựa chữ thập in the house; they may have a record of the location of the tile field and septic tank. A few phone calls or office visits may save a lot of time and effort in locating the system. If their records are inaccurate (or non-existent), consider talking to neighbors who have lived in the area for many years to see if they can shed any light on the matter. You may be surprised - some homes are connected to community septic systems; you may have no on-site septic system to be concerned with!

If you're still unable to locate the septic system, don't pick up a shovel and start digging random test holes yet. First, inspect your house and yard. Is there an interior or exterior cleanout near the outside wall of your house? Is there a level open area near the house, one where no bushes or trees are planted? The cleanout location suggests the septic tanks are nearby, and a level, open area suggests it may be time to grab a shovel. Hold off just a little longer though.

There is a book written by Erma Bombeck entitled "The Grass Is Always Greener Over the Septic Tank", a humorous look at rural life in America. It can be true; you may find that the grass is greener over the septic field (not the tank) -- especially in the hot, dry months of the summer. If you're looking for your septic system in the spring or fall when rainfall is more plentiful and the grass is green everywhere, make a probe with a metal rod and a handle at right angles to it. Grind the end of the rod to a point, and use your new tool to probe for the septic tank & field. In case you loved this informative article and you would love to receive details about ke dau cong i implore you to visit our web-site. The probe won't penetrate well in the summer when the ground is baked hard, but in the spring or fall you may be able to find the hard top of the septic tank and pipe or gravel bed at the corners of the tile field quickly by probing.

Finally, grab a shovel - it's time to dig. You'll need to find the access port for the septic tank so it can be cleaned out, and you'll need to locate the corners of the tile field to ensure traffic stays off it when you have that wedding reception in the back yard. Note that some houses have two septic tanks in series, and a very few houses have two tile fields. Once located, measure the positions of the septic tank(s) and tile field(s) relative to the house or nearby trees - then file it away for future use. Grab a glass of your favorite beverage, and slide into a hammock or lounge chair to relax, you've earned it!